Bill Gates’ next generation nuclear reactor to be built in Wyoming

In this June 10, 2010 photo, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates attends a news conference in Washington with fellow US execs about their group's recommendations to revolutionize energy innovation. (REUTERS File Photo)
In this June 10, 2010 photo, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates attends a news conference in Washington with fellow US execs about their group's recommendations to revolutionize energy innovation. (REUTERS File Photo)
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Updated 03 June 2021

Bill Gates’ next generation nuclear reactor to be built in Wyoming

Bill Gates’ next generation nuclear reactor to be built in Wyoming
  • The world's first Natrium reactor project features a 345-megawatt sodium-cooled fast reactor with molten salt-based energy storage
  • Small advanced reactors, which run on different fuels than traditional reactors, are regarded by some as a critical carbon-free technology

WASHINGTON: Billionaire Bill Gates’ advanced nuclear reactor company TerraPower LLC and PacifiCorp. have selected Wyoming to launch the first Natrium reactor project on the site of a retiring coal plant, the state’s governor said on Wednesday.
TerraPower, founded by Gates about 15 years ago, and power company PacifiCorp, owned by Warren Buffet’s Berkshire Hathaway , said the exact site of the Natrium reactor demonstration plant is expected to be announced by the end of the year.
Small advanced reactors, which run on different fuels than traditional reactors, are regarded by some as a critical carbon-free technology than can supplement intermittent power sources like wind and solar as states strive to cut emissions that cause climate change.
“This is our fastest and clearest course to becoming carbon negative,” Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon said. “Nuclear power is clearly a part of my all-of-the-above strategy for energy” in Wyoming, the country’s top coal-producing state.
The project features a 345 megawatt sodium-cooled fast reactor with molten salt-based energy storage that could boost the system’s power output to 500 MW during peak power demand. TerraPower said last year that the plants would cost about $1 billion.
Late last year the US Department of Energy awarded TerraPower $80 million in initial funding to demonstrate Natrium technology, and the department has committed additional funding in coming years subject to congressional appropriations.
Chris Levesque, TerraPower’s president and CEO, said the demonstration plant would take about seven years to build.
“We need this kind of clean energy on the grid in the 2030s,” he told reporters.
Nuclear power experts have warned that advanced reactors could have higher risks than conventional ones. Fuel for many advanced reactors would have to be enriched at a much higher rate than conventional fuel, meaning the fuel supply chain could be an attractive target for militants looking to create a crude nuclear weapon, a recent report said.
Levesque said that the plants would reduce proliferation risks because they reduce overall nuclear waste.
In addition to bringing carbon-free power online, Wyoming Senator John Barrasso said construction of the demonstration project could lift up the state’s once active uranium mining industry.
Barrasso, the top Republican on the Senate Energy Committee, co-sponsored bipartisan legislation signed into law in 2019 that directed the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to create a path to licensing advanced nuclear reactors such as the TerraPower demo. 


Syrian family sue EU border agency over removal from Greece

Syrian family sue EU border agency over removal from Greece
Updated 16 sec ago

Syrian family sue EU border agency over removal from Greece

Syrian family sue EU border agency over removal from Greece
  • They say they were tricked into boarding a plane after they were told it was destined for Athens but instead it took them to Turkey
  • First-of-its-kind case will test the accountability of the EU’s border agency, Frontex, which blames Greek authorities for the deportation

LONDON: A Syrian family is taking the EU’s border agency to the European Court of Justice to seek damages for their deportation from Greece to Turkey, which occurred after they had lodged an asylum claim.

They say they were tricked into boarding a deportation flight by EU and Greek officials five years ago, after they were told they would be flown to Athens but were instead taken to Turkey.

Prakken d’Oliveira, a Dutch law firm specializing in human rights cases, said on Wednesday that it has filed a lawsuit against Frontex, the EU agency responsible for border enforcement, and is seeking damages on behalf of the family. The deportation amounted to a violation of their human rights, the firm said, and Frontex operated the flight that carried it out.

The incident was the first recorded case of expulsion of asylum seekers after the EU reached a deal with Turkey in 2016 that explicitly stated that people arriving in Greece would have access to a fair asylum procedure.

“Frontex has acknowledged there were human rights violations. (It) has accepted that the refugees never got the chance to have their asylum request processed,” said Lisa-Marie Komp, one of the lawyers representing the family.

She said it is critical that the EU agency is held accountable for its actions and added: “If it is to be given such a far-reaching mandate, then there should be effective possibilities to hold it to account. And if that is not possible, what it will amount to is the undermining of the basic principle of rule of law.

“Beside the fate of the family, what is so fundamental is that this is the first time the European court of justice will get the opportunity to rule whether Frontex can be held accountable.”

The action is the first of its kind brought before the Luxembourg-based tribunal. It will highlight the practice of illegal pushbacks and other methods that campaigners argue deny asylum seekers their rights.

Frontex has faced accusations of “actively destroying” the fundamental principles on which the EU was built by participating in the pushbacks.

The Syrian family, who have not been named for security reasons, said they were tricked into boarding the deportation flight after submitting asylum claims on the Greek island of Leros.

“I never knew I was (going to be) deported to Turkey,” the then 33-year-old father told reporters at the time. “The policemen said, ‘Leave your dinner, get your stuff, we will take you to a police station for the night and (then) tomorrow morning to Athens.’”

The family, which included four children between the ages of one and seven, were forced to sit separately on the flight. They identified representatives of the EU border agency by the insignia on their guards’ uniforms.

“They were in a very vulnerable position,” Komp said. “The treatment of the children on the flight was itself in contravention of the rights of the child, enshrined in article 24 of the charter of fundamental rights of the EU.

“The bottom line is they didn’t take any measures to check whether it was legal to take this family out of Greece.”

The family, from the Kurdish town of Kobani in Syria, are now living in northern Iraq, fearing persecution in war-torn Syria if they return home.

Frontex has blamed “national authorities” for the incident, arguing that its role was merely to provide “means of transport, trained escorts, translators and medical personnel.”

An investigation into the incident, the results of which were published 19 months later, found that the asylum claim was registered 11 days before the flight that took the family to Turkey but was only logged on the electronic police system a day after they were deported.

Yiannis Mouzalas, who was the minister in charge of Greek migration policy at the time, said he ordered an inquiry into the case when it became clear that “violations” had occurred.

“An asylum request was lodged and it was evident the process had been violated and something illegal had happened,” he said.

Mouzalas said he had no knowledge of the outcome of the inquiry because he subsequently left his post, but added: “I do know it was the responsibility of the competent Greek authorities (to remove them), not Frontex which transported them.”


‘Sweet day’ for Afghan sportswomen fleeing Taliban rule on latest flight

‘Sweet day’ for Afghan sportswomen fleeing Taliban rule on latest flight
Updated 20 October 2021

‘Sweet day’ for Afghan sportswomen fleeing Taliban rule on latest flight

‘Sweet day’ for Afghan sportswomen fleeing Taliban rule on latest flight
  • The female footballers, basketball players and others were among 369 passengers on the plane to Qatar
  • Flying alongside the athletes were expat Afghans who were visiting their homeland and were caught off guard by the speed of the Taliban victory

KABUL: Afghan women athletes expressed relief and optimism Wednesday as they fled Taliban rule on the latest flight out of Kabul, with one calling it a “sweet day for all of us.”
The female footballers, basketball players and others were among 369 passengers on the plane to Qatar, including more than 55 who were evacuated in coordination with global football body FIFA which is organizing next year’s World Cup in the Gulf monarchy.
The semi-regular flight to Doha, arranged by the Qatar government, has become a rare lifeline for Afghans with passports and visas since the Taliban seized power in August.
Wednesday’s flight was the most packed yet, and included several women athletes including 28-year-old basketballer Tahera Yousofi from Herat, who is heading to Canada.
“Today is a very, very sweet day for all of us because after many, many weeks our trek starts and we are very happy,” she told AFP.
Tahera used to play and train regularly in Afghanistan and has competed internationally, but since the hard-line Taliban returned this has proved impossible.
“The Taliban government don’t let us play and don’t let us get a job and we have to vacate this country, unfortunately,” she said.
Sports were banned when the Taliban last ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001, and since their return women’s freedoms have again been abruptly curtailed.
Flying alongside the athletes were expat Afghans who were visiting their homeland and were caught off guard by the speed of the Taliban victory.
Aside from Afghans, the passengers included citizens from the United States, Germany, Britain, Belgium, Ireland, the Netherlands, Canada, Japan and others.
Several families brought young children and babies, and some were so exhausted they fell asleep almost on take-off.
Sef and Zohra Amiri, 22 and 26, had planned a two-week visit from their home in Britain but ended up trapped for a fearful two and a half months.
“Finally we got the phone call from the British Embassy to help us to get out of here. Now we can finally breathe and we can fly wherever we want to go and (do) whatever we want to do,” said Zohra.
Since the Taliban took control of Kabul, the family has been trapped in their compound — particularly the women.
“My auntie went outside and the Taliban broke her foot. So that was really scary for us, really sad for us. As a woman we want all freedoms for us, like boys,” Zohra said.
The Qatari flights began on August 31 and depart around twice a week, carrying hundreds of passengers each time, including Afghans at risk under the new regime.
The Taliban have complained that the ongoing departure of many educated middle-class citizens and employees of the former US-backed government is a brain drain undermining their effort to stabilize the country.
But they have promised the international community not to interfere with the departure of Afghans with legitimate papers, despite reports of intimidation, and have cooperated with the Qatar air bridge.
On arrival in Qatar, the passengers are taken to a compound where they have access to Covid-19 testing and can rest and prepare for onward travel to their final destination.
Qatar says it “will continue to work with international partners on efforts that ensure freedom of movement in Afghanistan, including through serving as an active mediator between various parties.”


UK hospitals on the edge as government resists fresh COVID measures

UK hospitals on the edge as government resists fresh COVID measures
Updated 20 October 2021

UK hospitals on the edge as government resists fresh COVID measures

UK hospitals on the edge as government resists fresh COVID measures
  • Javid announced deals for two experimental COVID-19 antivirals
  • Britain has the eighth biggest death toll globally from COVID-19, with 139,000 fatalities

LONDON: Britain's health minister Sajid Javid on Wednesday resisted calls from doctors for fresh measures to halt a rising wave of COVID-19 infections despite their warnings that hospitals are on the edge of being overwhelmed.
Britain reported 223 new deaths from COVID-19 on Tuesday, the highest daily figure since March, and cases are the highest in Europe, with nearly 50,000 new infections reported on Wednesday.
Javid announced deals for two experimental COVID-19 antivirals, one developed by Merck and Ridgeback Therapeutics and another by Pfizer, doubling down on a strategy of relying on vaccines and drugs to limit the damage this winter, instead of restrictions.
But he warned that people should get vaccinated and take up booster shots when offered, or else "Plan B", involving limited steps such as mask mandates, a work from home order and vaccination passes to get into venues, might be enacted.
"We're looking closely at the data, and we won't be implementing our Plan B of contingency measures at this point," he said, adding that 5 million people aged over 16 remained unvaccinated and that cases could reach 100,000 cases a day.
"If we want to secure these freedoms for the long term, then the best thing that we can do is come forward (for a shot), once again, when that moment comes."
Britain has the eighth biggest death toll globally from COVID-19, with 139,000 fatalities. But it also had a quick start to its vaccine programme and Prime Minister Boris Johnson has lifted almost all restrictions in England, ending social distancing measures and mask mandates.
Johnson's government has said it is relying on vaccinations, including booster shots for the vulnerable, to avoid winter lockdowns, having already shut the economy three times.
But the rollout has stalled, slipping behind several other European countries, while the booster programme is off to a slow start.
"COVID-19 cases are rising and winter is drawing closer. If you have not been vaccinated, now is the time. If you are offered a booster please take up the offer," Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty said, adding that masks in crowded indoor spaces remained important.
Doctors have expressed concern that an increase in numbers going into hospital, combined with pressures on the National Health Service (NHS) from seasonal viruses, could leave hospitals unable to deal with long waiting lists and function normally.
Matthew Taylor, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, called for more measures.
"This is the middle of October. Things are only going to get worse," Taylor told BBC radio.
"The health service is right at the edge ... if you push much further we will not be able to provide the level of service that people need to have."
Javid said he did not believe the pressure on the NHS had become unsustainable, and added the government would act if that changed.
Andrew Pollard, the head of the Oxford Vaccine Group, said the risk was mainly in the unvaccinated.
He added that a subvariant of Delta that is growing in England was unlikely to change the picture. Javid said there was no reason to believe the subvariant posed a greater threat than Delta. 


British Somalis met with hatred and abuse after murder of MP

British Somalis met with hatred and abuse after murder of MP
Updated 20 October 2021

British Somalis met with hatred and abuse after murder of MP

British Somalis met with hatred and abuse after murder of MP
  • A Somali community center in London has moved its activities online over backlash fears
  • Attacks on the community began almost as soon as the identity of the killer was revealed

LONDON: British Somalis have received heightened death threats and abuse following the murder of an MP at the hands of a British man of Somalian origin, community leaders have said.

Community centers for British Somalis have been forced to close and residents have received abuse and physical attacks such as throwing things after lone suspect Ali Harbi Ali, 25, was arrested after the murder of Sir David Amess.

Police are continuing to question him over the stabbing, which has been declared terrorism-related.

Kahiye Alim, director of the Council of Somali Organisations, told The Times newspaper that the attacks began almost as soon as Ali was identified as the alleged attacker.

“We’ve heard reports of people being verbally abused on the tube (London’s metro rail) and the street, being told to ‘go back home’ and called ‘terrorist,’” Alim said.

He continued: “Some of our members have received death threats by email and had things thrown at their windows. We are a very distinct and recognizable group and very much in the fabric of British high streets.”

One Somali community center in London has decided to close its doors and operate online until further notice.

Alim said he understood that Ali's connections with Somalia were “very little” and that he had “probably never been” to the country. He said he was part of a “lost” generation of British Somalis whose parents “live on the myth of return.”

The attacker was born in the UK after his father — who had worked closely with the Somalian government while in the East African country — came to Britain in 1996.

There are at least 100,000 British Somalis in the UK, with the majority based in London. They are predominantly Muslim.

The Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) has announced guidance to help British Somalis and the wider Muslim community deal with hatred and abuse following the attack.

Zara Mohammed, the MCB’s secretary-general, said mosques in and around Southend, where Sir David was an MP, were devastated by his murder and that he was regarded as “a member of their family.”

“This is a heinous crime and we utterly condemn it,” Mohammed told The Guardian. “Nobody in the local Muslim community could believe how anybody could brutally murder anyone, never mind Sir David, who was so engaged with them.”

She said there was now “apprehension for Muslim communities.”

The council is producing updated guidance on how to report hate crimes, which will be translated into Somali and shared on WhatsApp.


Owner of plane in Sala crash ‘forbade use of pilot’

Owner of plane in Sala crash ‘forbade use of pilot’
Updated 20 October 2021

Owner of plane in Sala crash ‘forbade use of pilot’

Owner of plane in Sala crash ‘forbade use of pilot’
  • Fay Keely told the hearing that on July 6, 2018, six months before the fatal incident, she emailed David Henderson telling him not to use David Ibbotson again
  • Investigators in March 2020 concluded that Ibbotson was not licensed to fly the plane or to fly at night, and that he lost control and flew too fast as he tried to avoid bad weather

LONDON: The owner of a plane that crashed with Argentine footballer Emiliano Sala on board told a UK court on Wednesday she had ordered the operator not to use the pilot.
The plane — a single-engined Piper Malibu — came down in the Channel in January 2019, killing the 28-year-old striker and the 59-year-old pilot David Ibbotson as they returned from France to Wales.
The plane’s operator, David Henderson, is standing trial at Cardiff Crown Court in Wales, accused of endangering the safety of the plane.
The plane’s owner, Fay Keely, said she bought the plane on Henderson’s advice and allowed him to operate it and choose pilots.
But she told the hearing that on July 6, 2018, six months before the fatal incident, she emailed the operator telling him not to use Ibbotson again.
She did this after the Civil Aviation Authority informed her of two infringements when he was piloting.
She later learnt that Henderson had nevertheless hired Ibbotson for a flight with her sister on board just a month later.
“He allowed that to happen without my permission,” she stressed.
Asked by the defense whether she had repeated her warning to Henderson not to use the pilot, she said: “No. As far as I was concerned I had made my feelings clear that he shouldn’t be flying the aircraft.”
Lawyer Martin Goudie, for the prosecution, told the court on Tuesday that Henderson was unavailable to pilot the return flight carrying Sala and arranged for Ibbotson to fly instead.
Henderson, from Hotham, in Yorkshire, northern England, has denied one charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft.
The court was told on Monday he had admitted one count of attempting to discharge a passenger without valid permission or authorization.
That charge typically concerns a business operator failing to acquire the appropriate licenses to hire a plane commercially.
Sala died on the return flight from France, which he had visited to collect his belongings and say goodbye to teammates at Nantes after signing with Cardiff for a record £15 million (18 million euros, $19 million).
British air accident investigators in March 2020 concluded that Ibbotson was not licensed to fly the plane or to fly at night, and that he lost control and flew too fast as he tried to avoid bad weather.
The Air Accidents Investigation Branch said both the pilot and Sala were affected by carbon monoxide poisoning before the crash.