OIC offers to help Afghanistan peace, facilitate evacuations

OIC offers to help Afghanistan peace, facilitate evacuations
The OIC said it will seek to help achieve peace in Afghanistan and facilitate evacuation operations on Sunday. (@OIC_OCI)
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Updated 22 August 2021

OIC offers to help Afghanistan peace, facilitate evacuations

OIC offers to help Afghanistan peace, facilitate evacuations
  • Member states reiterate commitment to helping Afghans bring peace, security, stability and development
  • OIC says it is committed to helping Afghanistan and bringing peace to the country

JEDDAH: Lead members of 57 Islamic states gathered to reaffirm their commitment to Afghanistan during the current crisis, urging the future Afghan leadership to promote national reconciliation and adhere to the UN’s charter and resolutions.

During an emergency meeting at the invitation of Saudi Arabia, chair of the current session of the Islamic Summit, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation held the meeting of the OIC’s permanent representatives on Sunday to discuss the ongoing situation.
Speaking to Al-Hadath TV news channel, Dr. Shafiq Samim, the permanent Afghan representative to the OIC, said that he is optimistic about changes in the country’s political scene.
“The war has stopped, and the streams of blood have halted after 20 years of flowing. Peace and stability is now back to the country. Since the (takeover by) Taliban, we have not heard a sound of a bullet in the capital,” he claimed.




OIC Secretary-General Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen, left, and Dr. Saleh Al-Suhaibani, Saudi permanent representative to the OIC, speak during the meeting. (SPA)

He added that it is the first time in Afghanistan an opposition force reached the capital “without any destruction or resistance.”
He said that the gathering of humanitarian aid, especially to war-displaced Afghans, is an essential component of the talks.

We call for the protection and respect of the right to life and security and the dignity of the Afghan people, in accordance with international human rights treaties.

Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen, OIC secretary-general

At the meeting, OIC member states reiterated their commitment to helping Afghans bring their country peace, security, stability and development. The partakers also renewed the OIC’s commitment to Afghanistan as expressed in the organization’s resolutions adopted by the Islamic Summit and the Council of Foreign Ministers, other meetings, and the Makkah Declaration issued on July 11, 2018 by the International Ulama Conference on Peace and Stability in Afghanistan.
Chairing the meeting, held at the Jeddah-based headquarters of the General Secretariat, Dr. Saleh bin Hamad Al-Suhaibani, Saudi Arabia’s permanent representative to the OIC, reiterated the Kingdom’s support for the people of Afghanistan. He called on all member states to fully support the Afghan people and their choices “that they decide” without interference.
“Saudi Arabia renews its firm historical position of supporting peace, stability, solidarity, and unity in Afghanistan, as an extension to its extensive work in this regard for decades. Saudi Arabia, in this regard, would like the Taliban movement and all Afghan parties to work on maintaining security and stability as well as preserving souls and properties in Afghanistan,” he said.

The war has stopped, and the streams of blood have halted after 20 years of flowing. Peace and stability is now back to the country. Since the (takeover by) Taliban, we have not heard a sound of a bullet in the capital.

Dr. Shafiq Samim, permanent Afghan representative to the OIC

“King Salman has also called on Afghan leaders to continue their efforts, make a new start to achieve the Afghani people’s aspirations of security and stability while taking into consideration dialogue, reconciliation, and tolerance as noble Islamic instructions — the same main principles were included in the Makkah Declaration,” Al-Suhaibani said.
“The Afghan people have suffered from the scourge of wars and loss of innocent lives. The time has come for the people of all components to live in peace and security,” he added.
OIC Secretary-General Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen warned that the international community and the ruling party must work together to ensure that Afghanistan is not used as a haven for terror groups.
He said that the international community and the OIC expect Afghan authorities to promote inclusive dialogue among all segments of society, to achieve national reconciliation, respect international treaties and conventions, and abide by the standards governing international relations enshrined in the UN’s charter and resolutions.
“We also call for the protection and respect of the right to life and security and the dignity of the Afghan people, in accordance with international human rights treaties.”
“We are firmly convinced that the international community, the Security Council, partners and regional organizations, must urgently provide all possible support and assistance to end the violence and ensure the restoration of security, public order and stability in Afghanistan without interfering in its internal affairs so that stability and security can be restored,” he said.


Riyadh’s 70s-themed cafe takes patrons back in time

Riyadh’s 70s-themed cafe takes patrons back in time
Updated 24 October 2021

Riyadh’s 70s-themed cafe takes patrons back in time

Riyadh’s 70s-themed cafe takes patrons back in time
  • Cafe recalls memories, nostalgic emotions flooding back as soon as they sit down for a cup of tea or soda pop

RIYADH: With its retro furnishings, decor, coffee, posters, and food, Riyadh’s Seventies Cafe is a blast from the past. 

For many residents, the cafe recalls memories, nostalgic emotions flooding back as soon as they sit down for a cup of tea or soda pop. 

“We wanted to relive the 70s a bit and serve the community something exciting and new,” said Bandar Al-Quraishi, founder of the Seventies Cafe.

On why he chose the 70s era as his theme, Al-Quraishi said: “I love everything about the 70s: the music, the clothes, everything. It was a great historical era. It was when the Kingdom saw an acceleration in urbanization and made major steps toward the Saudization of its oil and other industries.”

The new venue is decked out entirely in vintage items from the 70s and has been causing quite the stir since opening in the Al-Nakheel district.

“People’s response has been great!” Al-Quraishi said. “There are many local coffee shops scattered around our area, so one of the comments we’ve most frequently received is how nice it is to have such a unique cafe. Everyone loved the decor and the nostalgic feelings it inspired.”

He noted that, in the beginning, the idea of ​​the cafe was to target the elderly, the retired, and those who were seeking calm and comfort. To his surprise, the venue attracted many different age groups.

Retro TVs, radios, photos of old actors and musicians, and posters of figures ranging from the late King Khalid bin Abdulaziz to Egyptian singer Umm Kalthum decorate the interior, all part of Al-Quraishi’s efforts to have his cafe stand out.

“The aim was to create a unique, authentic and sustainable atmosphere through simple decor, high-quality products, and fair prices,” he said. “I was inspired by the old Riyadh period, and I wanted my cafe to serve as a museum for all to enjoy.”

One of its regular customers, Faris Al-Aqeel, head of Riyadh’s classical cars league, said that a walk through the old door of this cafe lands customers back in the 70s, offering a genuine vintage experience.

“It is so great to see smiles on the faces of those who lived during that era as soon as they enter,” he said. “You can tell that everything here reminds them of the good old days.”  

Speaking to Arab News, Saudi author Ali Saeed, a regular patron of the cafe, said that it is one of his favorites in the capital.

“I always recommend it to people who come to Riyadh. The last guest I brought here was Iraqi novelist, poet, screenwriter and documentary filmmaker Ahmed Saadawi, who won the 2014 International Prize for Arabic Fiction for his novel ‘Frankenstein in Baghdad.’”


Saudi soldier who died in Iraqi prison finally home and at rest

Saudi soldier who died in Iraqi prison finally home and at rest
Updated 24 October 2021

Saudi soldier who died in Iraqi prison finally home and at rest

Saudi soldier who died in Iraqi prison finally home and at rest
  • Capt. Abdullah Al-Qarni was captured in Kuwait during first Gulf War; his death was not discovered until after Saddam’s fall

MAKKAH: After three decades, Capt. Abdullah Al-Qarni, a Saudi soldier who was captured by Iraqi forces during Operation Desert Storm and died in an Iraqi prison, finally returned home this week.

His remains arrived at King Abdulaziz airport on Oct. 21 and were taken to Makkah for funeral prayers and burial at the city’s Cemetery of Martyrs.

The chain of events that led to his death began on Aug. 2, 1990, when Iraqi forces invaded Kuwait and took over the capital city within a matter of hours. The surprise attack was the beginning of a seven-month occupation of the country. In response, troops, tanks, artillery, ships and aircraft from more than 40 allied countries, led by the US, mobilized and gathered in the Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province and the capital, Riyadh, for Operation Desert Storm, with the aim of driving the invaders out of Kuwait.

By Jan. 17, 1991, an allied force of more than 600,000 ground, sea and air troops had assembled and an aerial and naval bombardment began. This was followed a week later by a ground assault. Al-Qarni was among the troops.

Most of the casualties during the 42-day war were among the Iraqi troops, with some estimates suggesting as many as 35,000 were killed. Dozens of allied troops also died. Among the Saudi forces, 18 were killed and 32 wounded. Eleven Saudi prisoners of war were later returned unharmed to the Kingdom. 

The exact circumstances that led to Al-Qarni’s capture remain unknown but it was eventually confirmed he was in a prison in Iraq and apparently died there at some point in the decade that followed, though the details are unclear. Years of efforts by Saudi authorities to have his remains returned home to his family were finally rewarded this week.

The martyred soldier’s brother, retired Saudi navy veteran Saleem Al-Qarni, and cousin, Saleh Salman Al-Qarni, told Arab News that he had died a noble death, serving his nation until the very end.

Before the war, they said, he had bid his three daughters and wife farewell and left their home town of Shaaf in Qarn, in Asir region, and headed to Riyadh for some military training.

“A few months before the Gulf War in 1990, my brother was chosen among a group to train in Al-Muzahimiyah (west of Riyadh),” said Saleem. “After more than a month, the brutal attack on Kuwait occurred and they were ordered to go directly there on military missions.”

He said that his brother did not hesitate to join the fight but it is believed that after about five days in action he was captured and taken to Iraq. The family was informed and the Saudi government continued to monitor the condition of detainees. Saleem said his brother was believed to still be detained in Iraq when US-led forces invaded the country in 2002.

After the death of former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and the fall of his regime, however, no trace could be found in any prison of Al-Qarni or a group of his friends. Later, his remains were identified and the family faced a new battle to have them returned. But they never gave up hope and, with the help of the Saudi government, continued their campaign.

“The government also did a thorough follow-up of all necessary procedures, until his remains were identified and taken back home,” said Saleem.

“My brother died fearlessly defending our country. God granted him the honor of martyrdom while he was defending the region with his colleagues who knew of the sacrifices and were loyal, fearless and defended their country to the very end.”

In 2004 the family had a death certificate issued the following year, Saleem married his brother’s widow to take care of her and his three nieces, the youngest of whom Abdullah only saw for a day before shipping out. Together they had two more daughters and remained together as a family until she died in 2019.

Saleem explained that his parents endured a lot of suffering as a result of what happened to his brother. Because his whereabouts were unknown until his death was confirmed, they had clung to the hope that they might be reunited. His father died in 2000 and his mother in 2015.

Saleh said that the martyrdom of his cousin while defending his country was a source of the utmost honor, pride and nobility. He was very religious and loyal to his homeland and king, he added, and did his duty without hesitation for the sake of his country and region.

“We bid him farewell as a body and soul and welcome his remains,” said Saleh. “This situation creates mixed feelings of pain, loss and pride. We are comforted that he honored his duty. We lost his pure soul and beautiful spirit in the darkness of Iraqi prisons.”


Saudi data science camp graduates first student group

Saudi data science camp graduates first student group
Updated 24 October 2021

Saudi data science camp graduates first student group

Saudi data science camp graduates first student group
  • The initiative aims to graduate more than 900 young professionals in data science and artificial intelligence during 2021

RIYADH: The Saudi Data and Artificial Intelligence Authority celebrated on Friday the graduation of the first 35 graduates of the data science camp launched in July.

The SDAIA academy initiative aims to graduate more than 900 young professionals in data science and artificial intelligence during 2021.

The graduation ceremony was attended by Saudi Minister of Communications and Information Technology Abdullah bin Amer Al-Swaha and SDAIA President Dr. Abdullah bin Sharaf Al-Ghamdi, among other officials.

Meanwhile, 20 teams qualified for the boot camp stage of the second edition of the Global Artificial Intelligence Artathon.

The event will now move to workshops and training sessions aimed at building attendees skills and the opportunity to complete the final versions of their artworks.

Three teams will be nominated to win cash prizes of up to SR500,000 ($133,305).

The Artathon is one of the main initiatives of the World Artificial Intelligence Summit, where people interested in music, interactive art, drawing and stereoscopic art work together with data and AI experts to create artwork using AI techniques.

This edition received worldwide attention, with 8,400 artists and programmers representing 69 countries taking part, and 500 candidates representing 164 teams being selected.

During the ceremony, Al-Ghamdi congratulated the graduates and those who qualified for the second phase of the Artathon, praising “their tireless efforts that reflect their keenness to make the most of the programs offered to them.”

Al-Ghamdi said that improving national competencies in the field is one of the top priorities of the SDAIA. He added that it comes as a result of the support and guidance of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who is keen to support the national development process and achieve the objectives of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.

The second edition of the Global Artathon of Artificial Intelligence falls within the SDAIA’s partnerships with the Saudi Federation for Cybersecurity, Programming and Drones, Misk Art Institute and the Saudi Telecom Company, which sponsored the graduation ceremony.


Who’s Who: Naser Almarri, Saudi specialist in seed production policies and strategies

Who’s Who: Naser Almarri, Saudi specialist in seed production policies and strategies
Updated 24 October 2021

Who’s Who: Naser Almarri, Saudi specialist in seed production policies and strategies

Who’s Who: Naser Almarri, Saudi specialist in seed production policies and strategies

Since February, Naser Almarri has been general director of the Seed Center — MEWA; chairman of the Committee of Seed Producers in Saudi Arabia; and general-secretary of the National Committee on Plant Genetic Resources 2019.

Before that, he was deputy director general at the Natural Resources Department from June 2016 to September 2018.

Almarri is a specialist in seed production policies and strategies, seed and plant genetic resources laws, seed production, quality control, seed certification, field, horticultural crops varieties evaluation, seed testing, plant genetic resources collection, storage, evaluation, identification and maintenance.

He has experience and knowledge spanning more than 20 years in the application of agricultural and environmental strategies, programs and projects to achieve food security and sustainable development of areas with diverse ecosystems.

Almarri has been Saudi Arabia’s representative at the Gulf Cooperation Council since Sept. 2018. He is a member of the Kingdom’s team preparing the first report on biodiversity for food and agriculture.

Almarri is a member of the team for the national transformation program and the coordinator in the preparation of reports on the strategy and national plan of forests.

He is a member of the preparatory committee of the Saudi Environment Council.

Almarri has been a member of the National Committee for the preparation of sustainable development indicators from January 2015 till now.

He has published several articles in the Riyadh newspaper on the environment, biodiversity for sustainable development, and seed production.

Almarri obtained a master’s degree in 2002 from King Saud University with a specialization in agriculture science. He completed a Ph.D. in 2014 from the University of Reading in England on the environment and seed physiology.


Pakistan’s PM welcomed in Madinah, Islam’s second holiest city

Pakistan’s PM welcomed in Madinah, Islam’s second holiest city
Updated 24 October 2021

Pakistan’s PM welcomed in Madinah, Islam’s second holiest city

Pakistan’s PM welcomed in Madinah, Islam’s second holiest city

MADINAH: Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan and his accompanying delegation arrived in Madinah on Saturday to visit the Prophet’s Mosque.

Upon his arrival at Prince Mohammed bin Abdulaziz International Airport, he was received by Prince Saud bin Khalid Al-Faisal, deputy governor of Madinah Region; Maj. Gen. Fahd bin Saud Al-Juhani, regional commander; Maj. Gen. Abdul Rahman bin Abdullah Al-Mashhan, regional police director; Ibrahim bin Abdullah Berri, director general of the Royal Protocol Office in Madinah; and many civilian and military officials.