Shamima Begum’s Daesh husband denounces terror attacks but still wants caliphate

Yago Riedijk, then around 22, married Begum when she was just 15, within days of her arrival in Syria in 2015. (Screenshots/Sky TV/ITV)
Yago Riedijk, then around 22, married Begum when she was just 15, within days of her arrival in Syria in 2015. (Screenshots/Sky TV/ITV)
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Updated 09 November 2021

Shamima Begum’s Daesh husband denounces terror attacks but still wants caliphate

Yago Riedijk, then around 22, married Begum when she was just 15, within days of her arrival in Syria in 2015. (Screenshots/Sky TV/ITV)
  • Yago Riedijk married UK’s best-known Daesh member when she went to Syria aged 15
  • He refused to comment on group’s beheadings, abuses against Iraq’s Yazidis

LONDON: A Dutch man who married British Daesh bride Shamima Begum has said he does not condone terror attacks on European soil but still hopes that a caliphate will be established.

Yago Riedijk, 29, is imprisoned in a Kurdish-administered camp in Syria and has admitted to being a Daesh fighter.

Begum, one of Britain’s most well-known Daesh members, is campaigning to be allowed to return to the UK after her citizenship was revoked.

Riedijk, then around 22, married Begum when she was just 15, within days of her arrival in Syria in 2015. The pair had three children together, all of whom have died.

He said he had “beautiful memories” of their life together before Kurdish forces — with the assistance of NATO and regional states — destroyed Daesh’s so-called caliphate and imprisoned its surviving members.

Speaking to Alan Duncan, a Scottish soldier making a documentary about Daesh, Riedijk said despite his active role in the terror group, he disagreed with the many Daesh-inspired terror attacks that have taken place on European soil in recent years for “a number of reasons,” including “the prohibition on killing innocent people in Islam, on killing women and children. I see these attacks as not being Islamically responsible.”

However, Riedijk refused to comment on the group’s beheadings and its treatment of the Yazidi minority in Iraq, which experienced attempted genocide, slavery, mass sexual abuse, torture and other abuses at the hands of Daesh.

Begum has not been directly linked to any of these abuses, and she has been pushing the British government and general public to allow her to return to the UK.

In September, she appeared live on TV to say she would be “an asset” in the UK’s fight against terror.

The Home Office has consistently refused to allow her and other Daesh members back into the UK, choosing instead to strip them of their British citizenship where possible.

It has said the security of British citizens trumps the needs of those Deash recruits detained by Kurdish authorities.


Russia prosecutes veteran rock star for criticizing Ukraine conflict

Russia prosecutes veteran rock star for criticizing Ukraine conflict
Updated 7 sec ago

Russia prosecutes veteran rock star for criticizing Ukraine conflict

Russia prosecutes veteran rock star for criticizing Ukraine conflict
MOSCOW: Soviet rock legend and outspoken Kremlin critic Yuri Shevchuk has been charged with “discrediting” the Russian army after condemning Moscow’s military campaign in Ukraine during a concert.
Shevchuk faces a maximum fine of 50,000 rubles (770 euros, $800) if found guilty.
A case has been launched against him for “publicly discrediting the use of Russia’s armed forces,” a court in the city of Ufa in central Russia told the RIA Novosti news agency.
RIA Novosti said the case would be transferred to Shevchuk’s hometown Saint Petersburg.
On May 18, the 65-year-old performer told his audience in Ufa that it “is not the president’s ass that needs to be licked and kissed,” according to videos posted online.
“Now people are being killed in Ukraine. Why? Our guys are dying in Ukraine. Why?” he told a cheering crowd.
The frontman of the 1980s Soviet rock band DDT, Shevchuk has over the years publicly criticized President Vladimir Putin and opposed the annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014.

France, Germany, Belgium report first monkeypox cases

France, Germany, Belgium report first monkeypox cases
CDC microscopic image shows monkeypox virus particles. (Reuters)
Updated 20 May 2022

France, Germany, Belgium report first monkeypox cases

France, Germany, Belgium report first monkeypox cases
  • France, Belgium and Germany reported their first cases of monkeypox, joining several other European and North American nations in detecting the disease

PARIS: France, Belgium and Germany on Friday reported their first cases of monkeypox, joining several other European and North American nations in detecting the disease, endemic in parts of Africa.
Monkeypox was identified in a 29-year-old man in the Ile-de-France region, which includes Paris, who had not recently returned from a country where the virus is circulating, France’s health authorities said Friday.
Separately, the German armed forces’ microbiology institute said it has confirmed the virus in a patient who developed skin lesions — a symptom of the disease.
And in Belgium, microbiologist Emmanuel Andre confirmed in a tweet that the University of Leuven’s lab had confirmed a second of two cases in the country, in a man from the Flemish Brabant.
With the growing number of detected cases in several European countries, Germany’s health agency Robert Koch Institute has urged people returning from West Africa to see their doctors quickly if they notice any chances on their skin.
The rare disease — which is not usually fatal — often manifests itself through fever, muscle aches, swollen lymph nodes, chills, exhaustion and a chickenpox-like rash on the hands and face.
The virus can be transmitted through contact with skin lesions and droplets of a contaminated person, as well as through shared items such as bedding and towels.
Cases of monkeypox have also been detected in Italy, Portugal, Spain and Sweden as well as in the United States and Canada, leading to fears that the disease — normally concentrated in Central and West Africa — may be spreading.
Monkeypox usually clears up after two to four weeks, according to the WHO.


Norway stabbing suspect married to one of the victims: Police

Norway stabbing suspect married to one of the victims: Police
The attacker was initially suspected of having chosen victims at random. (Shutterstock)
Updated 20 May 2022

Norway stabbing suspect married to one of the victims: Police

Norway stabbing suspect married to one of the victims: Police
  • At least three people were stabbed with a sharp object, leaving one critically injured
  • Police at first said the attack in the village of Nore as random

A suspect was arrested in Norway after at least three people were stabbed with a sharp object, leaving one critically injured Friday, police said.
Police at first said the attack in the village of Nore as random, but later clarified that there was “a family relationship” between the assailant and at least one of the victims.
“This is a family from Syria, and the perpetrator and one of the injured are married,” police inspector Odd Skei Kostveit said in a statement.
Police said the suspect was a man who had received a restraining order in December following an investigation of domestic violence.
The suspect, who also was injured, was held on suspicion of “grievous bodily harm,” police said.
Two people were flown to a nearby hospital by helicopter, police said.
Nore, a village in the Numedal valley, is located 100 kilometers (62 miles) east of Oslo, Norway’s capital.
It was not immediately clear where in the village the attack took place. Norwegian media said a bus driver and students from a local school overpowered the suspect.
The school confirmed the incident on its website and said that its crisis management team was assisting the police and following up with the school’s students and staff.
Police spokesman Tor Richard Jansen confirmed that civilians overpowered the alleged assailant and “handed him over to firefighters” who arrived before the police.
William Scott, who was in the area delivering goods, told the VG newspaper he saw an injured woman lying on the ground.
“At first I thought it was a collision because there was a large pool of blood on the ground,” he said.
Norwegian broadcaster TV2 cited a witness saying bleeding victims came running from behind a convenience store. Pools of blood were seen on the asphalt, TV2 said.
“Such acts of violence are serious and despairing,” Norwegian Justice Minister Emilie Enger Mehl said in a statement.
The village which is surrounded by mountains, sits 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Kongsberg, where five people were fatally stabbed and four wounded in October when Espen Andersen Bråthen attacked strangers with a bow and arrows and knives.
Andersen Bråthen pleaded guilty at the start of his trial Wednesday. He also faces 11 counts of attempted murder for the attack in Kongsberg, a former mining town of 26,000 people.


Russian troops likely to redeploy from Mariupol: Britain

Russian troops likely to redeploy from Mariupol: Britain
More than 1,700 defenders of the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol have surrendered since Monday. (File/AFP)
Updated 20 May 2022

Russian troops likely to redeploy from Mariupol: Britain

Russian troops likely to redeploy from Mariupol: Britain
  • Russia will likely use troops from the city to reinforce operations elsewhere in the eastern industrial Donbas region, Britain’s Defense Ministry said

KYIV: With the number of defenders left holed up in a Mariupol steel factory dwindling, Russian commanders will be coming under increasing pressure to reallocate troops from the strategic southern port city to bolster their offensive in eastern Ukraine, Britain’s Defense Ministry said Friday.
More than 1,700 defenders of the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol have surrendered since Monday, Russian authorities said, in what appeared to be the final stage in the nearly three-month siege of the now-pulverized port city.
An unknown number of defenders remain in the sprawling complex, which is the last bastion of Ukrainian resistance in the city — a target from the start of the invasion that has been under effective Russian control for some time.
If the factory falls, Russia will likely use troops from the city to reinforce operations elsewhere in the eastern industrial Donbas region, but the duration of the stiff resistance will complicate or prolong that maneuver, Britain’s Ministry of Defense said in a daily intelligence report.
“Staunch Ukrainian resistance in Mariupol since the start of the war means Russian forces in the area must be re-equipped and refurbished before they can be redeployed effectively,” the ministry wrote on Twitter.
“Russian commanders, however, are under pressure to demonstrably achieve operational objectives. That means that Russia will probably redistribute their forces swiftly without adequate preparation, which risks further force attrition.”
Analysts have said it is likely that most of the Russian forces that were tied down by the battle there have already left.
How long the remaining troops in the Azovstal factory can still hold out, however, is not clear.
In a brief video message Thursday, the deputy commander of the Azov Regiment, which led the defense of the steel mill, said he and other fighters were still inside.
“An operation is underway, the details of which I will not announce,” Svyatoslav Palamar said.
Ukrainian troops, bolstered by Western weapons, thwarted Russia’s initial goal of storming the capital, Kyiv, and have put up stiff resistance against Moscow’s forces in the Donbas, which President Vladimir Putin now has set his sights on capturing.
The International Committee of the Red Cross said Thursday that it had gathered personal information from hundreds of the soldiers who had surrendered — name, date of birth, closest relative — and registered them as prisoners as part of its role in ensuring the humane treatment of POWs under the Geneva Conventions.
Amnesty International said in a tweet that the POW status means that the soldiers “must not be subjected to any form of torture or ill-treatment.”
At least some of the fighters were taken by the Russians to a former penal colony in territory controlled by Moscow-backed separatists. Others were hospitalized, according to a separatist official.
While Ukraine expressed hope for a prisoner exchange, Russian authorities have threatened to investigate some of the Azovstal fighters for war crimes and put them on trial, branding them “Nazis” and criminals.
The Azov Regiment’s far-right origins have been seized on by the Kremlin as part of an effort to cast Russia’s invasion as a battle against Nazi influence in Ukraine.


Police: 1 dead, 4 wounded in Chicago shooting

Police: 1 dead, 4 wounded in Chicago shooting
Updated 20 May 2022

Police: 1 dead, 4 wounded in Chicago shooting

Police: 1 dead, 4 wounded in Chicago shooting
  • An investigation is ongoing

CHICAGO: One person was killed and another four people were shot in Chicago on Thursday, authorities said.
Police spokesperson Tom Ahern said the shooting occurred at about 10:40 p.m. on the Near North Side.
One person died and the other four were taken to local hospitals in conditions ranging from serious to critical, Chicago Sun-Times reported. Police did not release their names or ages.
No additional details about the circumstances behind the shooting or any suspects has been released. An investigation is ongoing.