Iranian teachers protest oppression

Iranian teachers protest oppression
Teachers protest holding placards that say “We are full of pain, but silent. Teachers rise up to end discrimination.” (NCRI)
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Updated 25 December 2021

Iranian teachers protest oppression

Iranian teachers protest oppression
  • NCRI officials said the protests began on Dec. 15, demanding better treatment of teachers and educators
  • Protesters chanted “free all imprisoned teachers” and “free all political prisoners”

CHICAGO: Teachers and educators in Iran continued to protest in more than 100 cities this week against the clerical regime’s oppressive policies that target educators, officials from the US-based National Council of Resistance of Iran said Friday.

NCRI officials said the protests began on Dec. 15, demanding better treatment of teachers and educators. The Mullah-controlled Iranian parliament responded by introducing and adopting a law that provides a “ranking” of teachers that protestors and the NCRI called “deceptive.”

In a resolution unanimously endorsed by teachers’ groups, they vowed to not remain silent against the oppression and arrests of teachers and educators.

The resolution demands “the unconditional release of all imprisoned teachers, the halt to summoning, interrogating, and fabricating cases in unjust courts against the teachers.” It also pledged to support the imprisoned teachers.

“With their courageous protests today, Iranian teachers showed that they will not back down despite the clerical regime’s deceptive plans, threats, and suppressive measures. The teachers’ movement will carry on until their demands are met,” said NCRI President Maryam Rajavi.

Even if implemented, Rajavi said, the legislation “would not have met the minimum demands of teachers.” Protest leaders called the bill “a dagger” to the freedom of teachers and educators and they vowed to continue protests.

Despite threats and repressive measures implemented by the regime in response to the protests, teachers staged a large-scale protest in Tehran outside the Planning and Budget Organization and in as many as 100 other cities and villages outside of the local Education Ministry offices.

Protesters chanted “free all imprisoned teachers”, “free all political prisoners”, “we have heard too many promises, but no justice”, and “livelihood, dignity are our inalienable right,” as they protested the regime.

In several cities, such as Tehran, Mashhad and Shiraz, the suppressive forces charged at the teachers to disperse them, but were forced to retreat in the face of the teachers’ resistance and chants of “you, shameless.”

In Tehran, the State Security Force attempted to disperse teachers at the metro station exits to prevent them from joining together. But the teachers gathered outside the metro stations.

Many teachers had been summoned by intelligence and security agents and warned against staging protests.

In Mashhad, the SSF prevented the teachers from entering or leaving the protest site. In Shiraz, the Prosecutor’s Office had sent text messages to teachers, warning them against participating in the protest gathering.

Rajavi urged Iranian youths, particularly high school and university students, to join their teachers’ protests.

“The first lesson of the arisen teachers of Iran is to be free and courageous in the face of the mullahs’ oppression. The teachers’ movement will carry on until their demands are met,” Rajavi said.

She added: “The protests manifest the determination of the Iranian people to overthrow the clerical regime, which is the main cause of oppression, corruption, unemployment and poverty.”

The breadth of the protests has stymied the Iranian Mullahs. Protests were reported in Shiraz, Isfahan, Kermanshah, Kerman, Ramhormoz, Marivan, Ardabil, Lahijan, Yazd, Qazvin, Ilam, Karaj, Hamedan, Arak, Mashhad, Ahvaz, Rasht, Bandar Abbas, Neyshabur, Bushehr, Tabriz, Qom, Khorramshahr, Kashan, Sari, Najafabad, Nowshahr, Javanrud, Sanandaj, Kazerun, Firuzabad, Golpayegan, Borujerd, Khorramabad, Zanjan, Semnan, Neyriz, Bahmai, Mamasani, Jahrom, Shirvan, Izeh, Malayer, Babol, Shush, Gorgan, Abadeh, Borazjan, Darab, Lordegan, Mahshahr, Shahreza, Shahrekord, Sarbandar, Andimeshk, Bandar Khomeini, Pol Dokhtar, Lamerd, Sabzevar, Amol, Bukan, Bojnurd, Ferdows, Ashkanan, Nourabad, Aligudarz, Gachsaran, Shahin Shahr Dashtestan, Eslamabad-e Gharb, Azna, Torbat Heydariyeh, Gotvand, Behbahan, Bandar Ganaveh, Delfan, Sardasht, Semirom, Bijar, Bafgh, Qorveh, Dehgolan, Divanderreh, Shahrud, Torbat Jam, Chalus, Baneh, Farashband, Shahrbabak, and Abhar, Rajavi said.


Israel says sanctions relief for Iran could mean ‘terror on steroids’

Israel says sanctions relief for Iran could mean ‘terror on steroids’
Updated 16 sec ago

Israel says sanctions relief for Iran could mean ‘terror on steroids’

Israel says sanctions relief for Iran could mean ‘terror on steroids’
  • Warning against world powers easing sanctions against Tehran as they seek a new nuclear deal
JERUSALEM: Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said funding for Iran could lead to “terror on steroids” on Tuesday, in an apparent warning against world powers easing sanctions against Tehran as they seek a new nuclear deal.
“The last thing you want to do ... is pour tens of billions of dollars into this apparatus. Because what will you get? Terror on steroids,” Bennett said in a video address to the World Economic Forum in Davos.

UN Palestinian refugee agency seeks $1.6 billion

UN Palestinian refugee agency seeks $1.6 billion
Updated 42 min 21 sec ago

UN Palestinian refugee agency seeks $1.6 billion

UN Palestinian refugee agency seeks $1.6 billion
  • UNRWA’s funding suffered a blow in 2018 when former US president Donald Trump cut support to the agency

JERUSALEM: The UN agency for Palestinian refugees, UNRWA, announced a $1.6 billion funding appeal Tuesday to help counter “chronic” budget shortfalls.
It is the latest in a series of warnings from UNRWA on possible deep cuts if the international community fails to provide more support.
“Chronic agency budget shortfalls threaten the livelihoods and well-being of the Palestine refugees that UNRWA serves and pose a serious threat to the agency’s ability to maintain services,” agency head Philippe Lazzarini said in a statement.
UNRWA’s funding suffered a blow in 2018 when former US president Donald Trump cut support to the agency.
His administration branded UNRWA as “irredeemably flawed,” siding with Israeli criticisms of the agency founded in 1949, a year after Israel’s creation.
President Joe Biden’s administration has restored some support, but UNRWA has said it is still struggling.
In November, it warned it was facing an “existential threat” over budget gaps.
The agency has a staff of 28,000 and provides services such as education and health care to more than five million Palestinians registered in the Palestinian territories, including Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.


Coalition targets Houthi strongholds in Sanaa

Coalition targets Houthi strongholds in Sanaa
Updated 18 January 2022

Coalition targets Houthi strongholds in Sanaa

Coalition targets Houthi strongholds in Sanaa
  • The drone attack targeted oil tankers in the Abu Dhabi, killing three people and wounding six others

DUBAI: The Coalition announced on Tuesday a series of airstrikes against Houthi militia strongholds and camps in Yemen’s capital Sanaa, a day after the group launched a rare and deadly attack on the United Arab Emirates.

The drone attack targeted oil tankers in the Abu Dhabi, killing three people and wounding six others.

In a statement, the Coalition said it destroyed warehouses and communications system for drones in Jabal al-Nabi Shuaib. The UAE is part of the Saudi-led pro-government coalition fighting the Houthi militia.


Iranian-Swedish dissident’s ‘terrorist’ trial to open

Iranian-Swedish dissident’s ‘terrorist’ trial to open
Updated 18 January 2022

Iranian-Swedish dissident’s ‘terrorist’ trial to open

Iranian-Swedish dissident’s ‘terrorist’ trial to open
  • Habib Chaab is accused of ‘planning and carrying out a number of terrorist acts, including bomb attacks in Khuzestan province’
TEHRAN: The trial of an Iranian-Swedish dissident held in Iran for over a year accused of carrying out “bomb attacks” for an Arab separatist group opens Tuesday, the judiciary said.
Habib Chaab disappeared during a visit to Turkey in October 2020 and a month later appeared in a video broadcast by Iranian state television, in which he confessed to launching attacks.
In December that year, Turkish authorities announced the arrest of 11 people suspected of spying and involvement in the alleged kidnapping of Chaab on behalf of Iran.
Iran accuses Chaab of leading the Arab Struggle Movement for the Liberation of Ahvaz (ASMLA), which Tehran has designated as a terrorist group.
“The first hearing in the case of Habib Farjollah Chaab, also known as Habib Asyud, the leader of the terrorist group ASMLA, opens tomorrow (Tuesday) before Branch 26 of the Revolutionary Court,” the judiciary’s Mizan Online agency said.
Chaab is accused of “planning and carrying out a number of terrorist acts, including bomb attacks in Khuzestan province,” the agency said.
Khuzestan, an oil-rich southwestern province, has a large Arab population that has regularly complained of being marginalized.
Chaab is also accused of “destroying public property with the aim of opposing the Islamic republic,” Mizan said.
Iran does not recognize dual nationality for its nationals, and Sweden had been denied consular access to Chaab.
Turkish police say Chaab was kidnapped in Istanbul before being taken him to Van, on the Iranian border, before he was handed over to authorities in Tehran.
In a video broadcast by state television in Iran after his arrest, Chaab claimed responsibility for an attack in September 2018 on a military parade in the city of Ahvaz that killed at least 29 people.
Such videos are common in Iran, and are frequently condemned by rights groups arguing that confessions are often forced through torture.

Abu Dhabi requires COVID-19 booster shots to enter emirate

Abu Dhabi requires COVID-19 booster shots to enter emirate
Updated 18 January 2022

Abu Dhabi requires COVID-19 booster shots to enter emirate

Abu Dhabi requires COVID-19 booster shots to enter emirate
  • People entering the UAE capital must show a ‘green pass’ on gov’t app

DUBAI, UAE: Facing a nationwide surge in coronavirus cases fueled by the spread of the highly transmissible omicron variant, Abu Dhabi is requiring people entering the city to show proof of booster shots.
The government’s health app said earlier this week that people entering the capital of the United Arab Emirates must show a “green pass,” confirming their vaccination status. The app says that visitors are no longer considered fully vaccinated unless they have received a booster at least six months after their second dose.
Those wishing to enter Abu Dhabi also must have have tested negative for the virus within the last two weeks to maintain their “green” status.
Abu Dhabi requires that residents show their green pass before entering public places or government buildings.
The UAE boasts among the world’s highest vaccination rates per capita. The country has fully vaccinated more than 90 percent of its population, health authorities have said. Although infections had plummeted in December, cases recently have skyrocketed to heights unseen in months.