Saudi designer making a change in fashion industry 

Munif Al-Shammari, one talented young Saudi fashion designer, launched his own label, MNF, in 2019, which gained a lot of popularity in the Saudi market. (Supplied)
Munif Al-Shammari, one talented young Saudi fashion designer, launched his own label, MNF, in 2019, which gained a lot of popularity in the Saudi market. (Supplied)
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Updated 25 March 2022

Saudi designer making a change in fashion industry 

Munif Al-Shammari, one talented young Saudi fashion designer, launched his own label, MNF, in 2019, which gained a lot of popularity in the Saudi market. (Supplied)
  • To the upcoming generation of young designers, Al-Shammari strongly recommends they never give up on their dreams, follow their passion and find their own touch within it

JEDDAH: The rise of the fashion industry in Saudi Arabia can be attributed, at least in part, to the Kingdom’s rising designers and models, many of whom are working hard to gain recognition internationally.
The fashion industry in the Kingdom is striving to be more inclusive and diverse, specifically in menswear. From smart outfits to jewelry, men are catching up to women and hopping on the fashion bandwagon, with social media, celebrities, fashion blogs and brands all influencing consumer behavior trends.
Munif Al-Shammari, one talented young Saudi fashion designer, is breaking with stereotypes and encouraging individuals to embrace themselves in their own way.
“I firmly believe fashion is genderless, and has the power to make our bodies socially noticeable and reasonable,” he said. “My style is contemporary; I choose the fabric and design the way I want. Fashion, for me, is like a gateway.”

I firmly believe fashion is genderless, and has the power to make our bodies socially noticeable and reasonable. My style is contemporary; I choose the fabric and design the way I want. Fashion, for me, is like a gateway.

Munif Al-Shammari

Al-Shammari launched his own label, MNF, in 2019, which gained a lot of popularity in the Saudi market.
“I started off with (a collection of) six designs combined with simplicity and elegance, which was sold out within 10 days. This encouraged me to invest more in myself and my brand,” he said. “In the year 2021, I got nominated to participate in the 100 Saudi Brands Program, the first fashion exhibition organized by the Saudi Fashion Commission, which generated a great opportunity for everyone in the fashion industry.”
Being a self-taught designer, Al-Shammari works on creating new design and style that can really stand out. His creations are usually influenced by his birth city, Hail, and its diverse nature that is streamlined into his clothing pieces representing peacefulness and power at the same time.
The fabric incorporated into his designs is not something usually worn or used by men in Saudi Arabia. “I combine my expertise with how the world is evolving nowadays … in terms of freedom of expression, individual empowerment and gender equality, to create a fashion solution and empower both men and women through my designs and help them look elegant and stylish for every occasion.”
Although not a professional model, Al-Shammari considers it a side hobby, and started modeling in 2017. For him, modeling is not just posing or taking good-looking pictures, but more about self-expression.
“Through clothes, I learned how to express myself as if it was a language. This enabled me to empower myself to become the strong person I am.”
To the upcoming generation of young designers, Al-Shammari strongly recommends they never give up on their dreams, follow their passion and find their own touch within it. The fashion industry requires time, effort, accuracy, commitment and never quitting or giving up.
“As a form of self-expression, fashion can make you and others feel empowered. Most importantly, it is essential to humbly accept criticism and make the best out of it,” he said. “As long as you believe you can do it then work hard to do your best at it. Have positive thinking and surround yourself with supportive people.”


Saudi designers spotlighted at opening night of the Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah

Saudi designers spotlighted at opening night of the Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah
Updated 02 December 2022

Saudi designers spotlighted at opening night of the Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah

Saudi designers spotlighted at opening night of the Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah

DUBAI: The second edition of the Red Sea International Film Festival kicked off in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday night with stars from across the world descending on the red carpet. 

While stars like Sharon Stone, Shah Rukh Khan, Oliver Stone, Priyanka Chopra Jonas and many more graced the red carpet in striking fashion looks, Saudi designers also had their moment to shine at the prestigious event. 

Brazilian supermodel Alessandra Ambrosio wore a creation by Jeddah-based designer Yousef Akbar. (AFP)

Brazilian supermodel Alessandra Ambrosio dazzled in a blue jumpsuit from Jeddah-based designer Yousef Akbar. She completed the look with with a gold bangle and matching stud earrings. The model has often sported creations from Arab designers. Last month, she wore a lime gown by Lebanese couturier Zuhair Murad to a holiday brunch in Mexico.  

Jomana Al-Rashed (right) on the red carpet with Red Sea CEO Mohammed Al-Turki (left) and Hollywood star Sharon Stone (centre). (Getty Images)

Jomana Al-Rashed, the first Saudi Arabian woman to be appointed CEO of the Saudi Research and Media Group, was spotted posing alongside Hollywood star Sharon Stone, wearing Saudi label Loodyana.

Filmmaker Guy Ritchie with actress-wife Jacqui Ainsley. (Getty Images)

British actress Jacqui Ainsley, known for her role in the 2017 film "King Arthur: legend of the Sword," took to the red carpet wearing US-based label Dazluq, founded by Saudi designer Salma Zahran. Ashley is married to British filmmaker Guy Ritchie, who was also in attendance. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HONAYDA (@honaydaofficial)

Honayda Serafi, founder of the Saudi label Honayda, represented her own brand in a striking green ensemble. "Delighted to be attending the opening ceremony of the second edition of the Red Sea Film Festival in Jeddah, surrounded by successful talents from around the world, and celebrating Arab artists. A grand event bridging cultures from West to East, bursting creativity and beauty," she posted on Instagram, along with shots of her outfit. 

Sofia Guellaty, the founder and editor of Mille World, also took to the red carpet in an elegant gown from Honayda.

Lebanese influencer Nathalie Fanj was seen wearing an ethereal mermaid black gown from designer Tima Abed. She completed the look with dangling, heart-shaped earring from Chopard.

Saudi Arabian actress Mila Al-Zahrani looked stylish in a sleek black-and-white gown from label Mashael Al Faris. She was styled by Rawan Kattoa and wore jewelry from French label Boucheron. 

The opening night film was Shekhar Kapur’s film, "What’s Love Got to Do with It?," starring Lily James and Emma Thompson, written by Jemima Khan, and produced by StudioCanal and Working Title.


Palestine’s Nadeen Ayoub nabs runner up title at Miss Earth beauty pageant

Palestine’s Nadeen Ayoub nabs runner up title at Miss Earth beauty pageant
Palestinian contestant Nadeen Ayoub has been named Miss Earth Water. (AFP)
Updated 30 November 2022

Palestine’s Nadeen Ayoub nabs runner up title at Miss Earth beauty pageant

Palestine’s Nadeen Ayoub nabs runner up title at Miss Earth beauty pageant

DUBAI: Palestinian contestant Nadeen Ayoub has been named Miss Earth Water at the Miss Earth beauty pageant, which was held in Manila on Nov. 29.

Mina Sue Choi, a communications student from South Korea, won the Miss Earth crown, while three other hopefuls nabbed the elemental titles of Miss Fire, Miss Water and Miss Air.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Miss Earth (@missearth)

Columbia’s Andrea Aguilera was named Miss Earth Fire, while Australian hopeful Sheridan Mortlock scored the Miss Earth Air tiara.

Ayoub is the first woman to represent Palestine at the event, which was launched in 2001 and is recognized as one of four main international beauty pageants. Miss World, Miss Universe and Miss International round out the list.

Ayoub is a fitness coach and nutrition consultant and was one of two Arabs to compete — the other hopeful was Jihan Majid from Iraq.  

This year, 86 women competed in the pageant.


Designer Amina Muaddi to be honored at FN Achievement Awards in New York

Designer Amina Muaddi to be honored at FN Achievement Awards in New York
Amina Muaddi will receive the designer of the year prize at the 2022 FN Achievement Awards. (File/ Getty Images)
Updated 29 November 2022

Designer Amina Muaddi to be honored at FN Achievement Awards in New York

Designer Amina Muaddi to be honored at FN Achievement Awards in New York

DUBAI: Celebrity-loved Romanian Jordanian footwear designer Amina Muaddi has given her 1.3 million Instagram followers a glimpse of her recent trip to Japan before she receives the designer of the year prize at the 2022 FN Achievement Awards in New York on Nov. 30.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by AMINA MUADDI (@aminamuaddi)

The Footwear News awards is hosted by the American industry magazine that specializes in covering the international shoe industry. This year, Muaddi will be granted the designer of the year award, while Christian Louboutin will be given the lifetime achievement award. The best collaboration award will go to the “Manolo Blahnik for Birkenstock” collection, while the year’s best shoe has been unveiled as the Louis Vuitton x Nike Air Force 1 by late designer Virgil Abloh.

Muaddi — who flew to Japan after visiting Qatar, where she attended the recent Fashion Trust Arabia awards — shared two carousel posts on Instagram, giving her followers an inside peek at her time in the country.

In the bevy of stylish photos, Muaddi can be seen enjoying Japanese cuisine, posing beside a luxury pool and exploring Tokyo by night.

The designer was joined by a number of friends on the trip, including US Palestinian model and musician Fai Khadra. 

Muaddi gave readers insight into her jet set lifestyle and career highs and lows in a telling interview with Footwear News in September.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by AMINA MUADDI (@aminamuaddi)

“I was so passionate, so I was willing to go through any hardship,” she told the publication. “There’s a reason why only so many people get to this point, because you get tested a lot.

“Many times, I was close to giving up. I had to part ways with my partner, with producers, I’ve had (orders) canceled. It’s not about what you go through, it’s how you survive the situation and how you thrive after it. It’s a never-ending lesson,” she added.

The designer told the magazine that this year alone, her brand’s global sales revenue will total $55 million but added that after becoming an established shoes and accessories maker, her hardships have changed.

“It’s a matter of navigating and continuing no matter what,” she said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by AMINA MUADDI (@aminamuaddi)

Muaddi launched her eponymous footwear line in August 2018, approximately one year after departing from her role as co-founder and creative director of luxury footwear label Oscar Tiye.

The shoemaker’s eponymous label’s distinct pumps, sling-backs, mules, boots and sandals in an array of vibrant colors and holographic designs have since garnered a loyal checklist of famous fans, including Dua Lipa, Gigi Hadid, Kylie Jenner and Hailey Bieber Baldwin.

She helped design the shoes for Rihanna’s Fenty collection. The collaboration was so successful that it received the Collaborator of the Year award at the 34th edition of the FN Achievement Awards.

In 2020, she debuted a range of jewelry and handbags and collaborated with Austrian brand Wolford on an exclusive 17-piece capsule collection of ready-to-wear looks in 2021.

In October 2021, she landed a spot on Women’s Wear Daily (WWD) and Footwear News’s 50 Most Powerful Women list.


Dress to impress: The Saudi designer on a mission to make fashion sustainable

Dress to impress: The Saudi designer on a mission to make fashion sustainable
Updated 28 November 2022

Dress to impress: The Saudi designer on a mission to make fashion sustainable

Dress to impress: The Saudi designer on a mission to make fashion sustainable
  • Raneem Shaban, 27, aims to encourage change in the Kingdom’s fashion industry through creations that transform used clothing into something new
  • ‘I was worried people wouldn’t accept the idea of wearing something created mainly from used fabric or material but the mentality has changed,’ she said.

JEDDAH: A recent trend in global fashion has been an attempt to make the industry more environmentally friendly and sustainable. As a result, some designers have been inspired to create ready-to-wear clothing from recycled materials.

One of them is Saudi fashion designer Raneem Shaban from Jeddah. The 27-year-old launched her own custom-clothing label R*3 in 2021 with the aim of reducing “fashion waste” in the Kingdom’s fashion industry through upcycled and reconstructed creations that transform used or vintage clothing into something new.

“At first, I was worried that people wouldn’t accept the idea of wearing something that has been created mainly from used fabric or material but the mentality has changed and people are more adaptable,” she said.

Shaban, who graduated from Dar Al-Hekma University in Jeddah with a bachelor’s degree in fashion design, said she developed a fascination with creating clothes in early childhood.

“From a very young age, I had a passion to design clothes from the used materials that I found in my basement and one of my biggest joys was going through my mother’s wardrobe, which influenced me immensely toward a classic sense of style,” she said.

Shaban’s bold and daring designs are designed to be unique, challenging for the masses, and attention grabbing.

“As a designer, I believe it’s very essential to get out of your comfort zone and make a statement, for which I worked hard to reach out to people and make them understand the fashion-forward trend,” she said.

I was worried people wouldn’t accept the idea of wearing something created mainly from used fabric or material but the mentality has changed.

Raneem Shaban, Saudi fashion designer

Shaban has been involved in a number of projects, including collaborations on runway styling projects and editorial fashion shoots with Harpers Bazaar Arabia and Vogue Fashion Experience by Rubaiyat, and styling Nasibah Hafiz’s spring/summer 2022 collection, powered by La Macarena, among others.

She also participated in Fashion Star Arabia, a fashion-design competitive reality series broadcast on Dubai One. She recently showcased her collection at the Light Exhibition in Riyadh alongside other young, fashion designers.

“A fashion designer has the possibility to influence people and the way they dress; it’s a big responsibility to take the role seriously and be driven,” Shaban said.

“My work journey has been very rewarding. I have had the opportunity to meet distinguished fashion personalities and clients that acknowledged and appreciated my ready-to-wear collection. It feels great when people relate to my collection on a deeper and personal level.”

As part of her design process, Shaban creates fashion “mood boards” from images in old magazines that help to inspire her to create interesting new looks and styling options.

“I didn’t aim to adopt a sustainable approach because it’s ‘on-trend,’” she said. “Instead, I always had a passion for creating styles using recycled fabric or materials and converting it into a brand new, wearable outfit.”

In her role as a sustainable fashion designer, Shaban said she strives to always be mindful of the resources her label consumes and wastes, while at the same time ensuring her designs meet the demands of the marketplace. Feedback from her customers also helps her understand the needs of the market on a range of issues, including the materials and textures of fabric people prefer.

Shaban said she continually learns new things and tries to further explore sustainable materials and fashion trends. She plans to launch a line of accessories alongside her custom-made clothing in the near future.

“It’s important for me to be consistent in designing new collections from used fabrics, while making sure it matches the current fashion trends,” she explained. “The market in Saudi Arabia has changed dramatically and people are more open to bold and narrative style.

“It’s a lot to manage but when you aim to build a unique concept fashion style and receive encouragement for the work. It really makes you feel alive.

“The response to my custom-made designs has always been positive. It pumps the energy and pushes me to work hard and ignore the demands and challenges.”

Shaban said she finds it interesting that people who wear her brand are so aware of the benefits of eco-friendly fashion, and so she considers it her responsibility to help initiate a shift toward a more sustainable industry in the region.

“Under Saudi Vision 2030, I aim to bring more awareness and longevity toward sustainable fashion in the Saudi Arabia marketplace,” she added.

Asked what advice she could offer to aspiring young designers, she said she would encourage them to take time to figure out what it is that they really love and are good at, follow their passion, take risks and enjoy the challenges along the way.

 


Qatar Creates, CR Runway announce fashion show at FIFA World Cup

Qatar Creates, CR Runway announce fashion show at FIFA World Cup
Updated 28 November 2022

Qatar Creates, CR Runway announce fashion show at FIFA World Cup

Qatar Creates, CR Runway announce fashion show at FIFA World Cup

DUBAI: Qatar Creates and CR Runway announced a fashion show, featuring more than 150 designers from 50 countries, set to take place on Dec. 16 at the FIFA World Cup.

The event will feature performances by the likes of DJ Snake, Kadim Al-Sahir, Khaled, Nancy Ajram, Ozuna, Zakes Bantwini and more with the proceeds going to Education Above All, a Qatari charity that aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education for vulnerable and marginalized people, with a focus on the developing world.

A poster for the event. (Supplied)

Twenty-one Qatari brands will take part in the show, which will be made up of four choreographed runway presentations.

The show will feature an opening act with national ambassadors representing the 32 countries in the World Cup, all sporting customized jerseys. Then, two local Qatari brands — Aliya Al-Obaidly and Harlienz — will put on a performance entitled “Where the Sand Touches the Sea,” inspired by Qatar’s traditional practices of pearl diving.

The second act, titled “The Fashion World Tour,” will showcase works from designers from six continents. The third and final act, “One Night in Qatar,” will showcase haute couture and eveningwear created exclusively by international designers and brands for Qatar Fashion United by CR Runway.

The Qatar-based brands participating in the event are 1309, Al-Dukan, Aliya Al-Obaidly, Tamader Al-Sultan, Drizzle, Ghada Al-Buainain, Hairaat, Hamadis, Harlienz, Kaltham’s Pavilion, Lorenaa Michelle, Maryam Al-Darwish, Mhefhef, Muna Saad, Naila Al-Thani, Trzi, TIIYA, WAAD Designs, WADHA, Wit Noiz and Yasmin Mansour.