What We Are Reading Today: Think Again by Adam Grant

What We Are Reading Today: Think Again by Adam Grant
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Updated 19 April 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Think Again by Adam Grant

What We Are Reading Today: Think Again by Adam Grant

Adam Grant’s Think Again is a book about the benefit of doubt, and about how we can get better at embracing the unknown and the joy of being wrong. Evidence has shown that creative geniuses are not attached to one identity, but constantly willing to rethink their stances and that leaders who admit they don’t know something and seek critical feedback lead more productive and innovative teams.

New evidence shows us that as a mindset and a skilllset, rethinking can be taught and Grant explains how to develop the necessary qualities to do it. Section 1 explores why we struggle to think again and how we can learn to do it as individuals, arguing that “grit” alone can actually be counterproductive. Section 2 discusses how we can help others think again through learning about “argument literacy.” And the final section 3 looks at how schools, businesses and governments fall short in building cultures that encourage rethinking.

In the end, learning to rethink may be the secret skill to give you the edge in a world changing faster than ever.


What We Are Reading Today: Making the Cut

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Updated 20 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Making the Cut

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  • Making the Cut explores how key gatekeepers—HR managers, recruiters, and talent acquisition specialists—evaluate workers with nonstandard, mismatched, or precarious employment experience

Author: David Pedulla

Millions of workers today labor in nontraditional situations involving part-time work, temporary agency employment, and skills underutilization or face the precariousness of long-term unemployment. To date, research has largely focused on how these experiences shape workers’ well-being, rather than how hiring agents perceive and treat job applicants who have moved through these positions. Shifting the focus from workers to hiring agents, Making the Cut explores how key gatekeepers—HR managers, recruiters, and talent acquisition specialists—evaluate workers with nonstandard, mismatched, or precarious employment experience. Factoring in the social groups to which workers belong—such as their race and gender—David Pedulla shows how workers get jobs, how the hiring process unfolds, who makes the cut, and who does not.
Drawing on a field experiment examining hiring decisions in four occupational groups and in-depth interviews with hiring agents in the US, Pedulla documents and unpacks three important discoveries.

 


What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Red Book’

What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Red Book’
Updated 19 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Red Book’

What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Red Book’

“The Red Book Liber Novus: A Reader’s Edition” is a manuscript written by Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung.

The work is a collection of Jung’s notes compiled between 1914 and 1930 that was made public in 2009 by his heirs, and edited by Suno Shamdasani in 2012.

The book includes a facsimile reproduction of some of Jung’s original handwritten notes.

Jung was a close friend of psychiatrist Sigmund Freud, but the relationship ended over differences of opinion.

“The Red Book” came to life after his break from Freud, where Jung highlights the earliest accounts of his theories on the collective unconscious and individuation.

In it, Jung describes the self-experimentation phase as his “most difficult experiment” where he began deciphering his strange dreams through analytical psychology.

The folio manuscript is divided into two parts: “Liber Primus” and “Liber Secundus” or the first and second book respectively.

Throughout the publication, Jung puts his experience into context by using analogies from history to deconstruct the unconscious mind.

The first part contains 11 chapters in which Jung expresses himself as a flawed human with more questions than answers. “Liber Primus” is a discovery of his soul and its relationship with God and the Universe.

The second part holds 21 chapters in which Jung discusses his encounter with a demon that resides within his soul.

In response to Sigmund Freud’s founding of psychoanalysis, Jung founded analytical psychology, a practice that delves into the patients’ unconscious mind with the aim to treat various mental illnesses and personality disorders.

His influence spanned numerous fields such as psychiatry, anthropology, religion, archeology and literature.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Microbial Life History

What We Are Reading Today: Microbial Life History
Updated 18 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Microbial Life History

What We Are Reading Today: Microbial Life History

Author: Steven A. Frank

Design and diversity are the two great challenges in the study of life. Microbial Life History draws on the latest advances in microbiology to describe the fundamental forces of biological design and apply these evolutionary processes to a broad diversity of traits in microbial metabolism and biochemistry.

Emphasizing how to formulate and test hypotheses of adaptation, Steven Frank provides a new foundation for exploring the evolutionary forces of design.

He discusses the economic principles of marginal valuations, trade-offs, and payoffs in risky and random environments; the social aspects of conflict and cooperation; the demographic aspects of age and spatial heterogeneity; and the engineering control theory principles by which systems adjust to environments.

Frank then applies these evolutionary principles to the biochemistry of microbial metabolism, providing the first comprehensive link between the forces that shape biological design and cellular energetics.


What We Are Reading Today: Work Matters by Maureen Perry-Jenkins

What We Are Reading Today: Work Matters by Maureen Perry-Jenkins
Updated 17 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Work Matters by Maureen Perry-Jenkins

What We Are Reading Today: Work Matters by Maureen Perry-Jenkins

Low-wage workers make up the largest group of employed parents in the US, yet scant attention has been given to their experiences as new mothers and fathers. Work Matters brings the unique stories of these diverse individuals to light. Drawing on years of research and more than 1,500 family interviews, Maureen Perry-Jenkins describes how new parents cope with the demands of infant care while holding down low-wage, full-time jobs, and she considers how managing all of these responsibilities has long-term implications for child development. She examines why some parents and children thrive while others struggle, demonstrates how specific job conditions impact parental engagement and child well-being, and discusses common-sense and affordable ways that employers can provide support.

In the US, federal parental leave policy is unfunded. As a result, many new parents, particularly hourly workers, return to their jobs just weeks after the birth because they cannot afford not to.


What We Are Reading Today: Slaying the Dragon

What We Are Reading Today: Slaying the Dragon
Updated 16 August 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Slaying the Dragon

What We Are Reading Today: Slaying the Dragon

Author: Ben Riggs 

Ben Riggs’s Slaying the Dragon reveals the true story of the rise and fall of TSR— the company that unleashed imaginations with Dungeons & Dragons.

Go behind the scenes of their Lake Geneva headquarters where innovative artists and writers redefined the sword and sorcery genre, managers and executives sabotaged their own success by alienating their top talent, accruing a mountain of debt, and agreeing to deals which that made them into a publishing company unable to publish so much as a postcard.

As epic and fantastic as the titles TSR published, Slaying the Dragon is the legendary tale of the rise and fall of the company that created the role-playing game world.