Shanghai partly resumes public transport in patchy reopening

Shanghai partly resumes public transport in patchy reopening
Four of the city’s 20 subway lines restarted Sunday along with some road transport, and those who take public transport will have to show a negative COVID-19 test within 48 hours of their journey. (Reuters)
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Updated 22 May 2022

Shanghai partly resumes public transport in patchy reopening

Shanghai partly resumes public transport in patchy reopening
  • China’s largest city has been almost entirely locked down since April
  • Four of the city’s 20 subway lines restarted Sunday along with some road transport

SHANGHAI: Shanghai partially restarted public transport Sunday and set out new classifications for COVID-19 risk areas, signaling a gradual reopening after nearly two months sealed off from the outside world.
China’s largest city has been almost entirely locked down since April, when it became the epicenter of the country’s worst coronavirus outbreak since the early days of the pandemic.
Unlike other major economies, Beijing has dug in its heels on a strict zero COVID-19 approach that relies on stamping out clusters as they emerge, though this has become increasingly difficult with the infectious omicron variant.
But as new infections have slowed, Shanghai has cautiously eased restrictions, with some factories resuming operations and residents in lower-risk areas allowed to venture outdoors.
Four of the city’s 20 subway lines restarted Sunday along with some road transport, with officials announcing last week that it would provide a “basic network covering all central urban areas.”
Those who take public transport will have to show a negative COVID-19 test within 48 hours of their journey and have a “normal temperature,” they added Saturday.
Shanghai will also classify areas as high, medium or low-risk after May 31, city health official Zhao Dandan told a press briefing on Sunday.
Districts with 10 or more reported COVID-19 cases — or at least two community infections — will be considered “high-risk” while areas with no positive cases for 14 days will be deemed “low-risk,” Zhao said.
Medium or high-risk areas face lockdowns of two weeks.
The new system appears to set the stage for a degree of movement comparable to other cities, a shift from tough current measures in which even residents of lower risk areas have faced tight restrictions.
But despite broader attempts to ease those restrictions, the city’s central Jing’an district was back under lockdown on Sunday, according to an official notice.
Jing’an will undergo three consecutive rounds of mass COVID-19 testing from Sunday and residents are not to leave their homes during this period, a WeChat notice said.
“Exit permits that have been issued will be suspended,” the notice added Saturday, while assuring residents that “victory is not far away.”
The city of 25 million residents reported more than 600 COVID cases on Sunday, 570 of them asymptomatic, according to National Health Commission data.
But restrictions continued in other Chinese cities with COVID-19 cases, including the capital Beijing, which has already banned dining out and forced millions to work from home.
As of Saturday, nearly 5,000 people in Beijing’s Nanxinyuan residential compound had been relocated to quarantine hotels after 26 new infections were discovered in recent days, state media reported.
Fears have run high that the city may take a similar approach to Shanghai, where the lockdown has denied many adequate access to food and medical care.


Ukraine army accuses Russia of firing phosphorus bombs on Snake Island

Ukraine army accuses Russia of firing phosphorus bombs on Snake Island
Updated 5 sec ago

Ukraine army accuses Russia of firing phosphorus bombs on Snake Island

Ukraine army accuses Russia of firing phosphorus bombs on Snake Island
KYIV: Ukraine’s army accused Russia of carrying out strikes using incendiary phosphorus munitions on Snake Island Friday, just a day after Moscow withdrew its forces from the rocky outcrop in the Black Sea.
“Today at around 18:00... Russian air force SU-30 planes twice conducted strikes with phosphorus bombs on Zmiinyi island,” it said in a statement, using another name for Snake Island.
The Russian defense ministry on Thursday described the retreat as “a gesture of goodwill” meant to demonstrate that Moscow will not interfere with UN efforts to organize protected grain exports from Ukraine.
The Ukrainian army on Friday accused the Russians of being unable to “respect even their own declarations.”
Its statement was accompanied by a video that showed a plane drop munitions at least twice on the island, and what appeared to be white streaks rising above it.
Phosphorus weapons, which leave a signature white trail in the sky, are incendiary weapons whose use against civilians is banned under an international convention but allowed for military targets.
Ukraine has accused Russia of using them several times since it invaded its neighbor in late February, including on civilian areas, allegations Moscow has denied.
Ukraine claimed the Russians were forced to retreat from the island after coming under a barrage of artillery and missile fire.
Snake Island became famous after a radio exchange went viral at the start of the war, in which Ukrainian soldiers respond using bad words to a Russian warship that called on them to surrender.

In rare animal rights push, Pakistan to work with PETA on ‘critical’ reforms

Pakistani veterinarians give treatment to a dog at the Animal Care Center in Karachi on Aug. 16, 2016. (AFP)
Pakistani veterinarians give treatment to a dog at the Animal Care Center in Karachi on Aug. 16, 2016. (AFP)
Updated 16 min 21 sec ago

In rare animal rights push, Pakistan to work with PETA on ‘critical’ reforms

Pakistani veterinarians give treatment to a dog at the Animal Care Center in Karachi on Aug. 16, 2016. (AFP)
  • Government on Thursday banned testing, surgeries on live animals at veterinary schools in Islamabad
  • Country says it will amend British-era regulations with ‘Pakistan’s first comprehensive animal welfare law’

ISLAMABAD: Shalin Gala, vice president at global animal rights advocacy group PETA, on Friday hailed “landmark” reforms in Pakistan that banned tests and surgeries on live animals for veterinary education, and said the organization would be working with the government on more critical reforms in training that would spare the lives of animals.

In a rare move to ensure animal rights in Pakistan, the government on Thursday banned testing and surgeries on live animals at veterinary schools and industrial complexes in the federal capital, Islamabad, and announced a 15,000 rupee ($74) fine and jail term for animal cruelty offenders.

The decision came after widespread outrage in Pakistan over videos that went viral in May showing animals in various states of distress after allegedly being operated upon by veterinary students. Activists and members of the public have widely condemned the practices and called for action.

At veterinary schools around the world, the practice of using live animals to teach surgery has been on the decline in the last decade, but an Arab News investigation published on June 10 quoted students and university management saying live animals were being used to teach surgical skills, though they added proper procedures were followed.

“Pakistan’s landmark reforms will ban tests and surgeries on live animals for veterinary education and shift to sophisticated humane methods,” Gala told Arab News.

He said PETA was “delighted” to have shared recommendations for improving veterinary training with Salman Sufi, head of Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif’s Strategic Reforms Unit.

“We look forward to our upcoming meeting with him to discuss further critical reforms in biomedical research and training that will spare animals’ lives and benefit patients, alike,” Gala added.

As Sufi introduced the ban on live testing of animals in Islamabad, he announced the government would introduce “Pakistan’s first comprehensive animal welfare law,” amending British colonial era regulations.

“Amendments for national level law are ready ... The bill will be tabled in the National Assembly during the next session (for debate and approval),” he said.

Citizens will be able to report any acts of animal cruelty through a hotline. A standard set of guidelines will also be announced to regulate pet markets across the country, Sufi said, adding that violators would be fined and their shops closed.

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Taliban chief pardons members of former administration in rare public appearance

Zabiullah Mujahid, left, the spokesman for the Taliban government, speaks during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan
Zabiullah Mujahid, left, the spokesman for the Taliban government, speaks during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan
Updated 24 min 36 sec ago

Taliban chief pardons members of former administration in rare public appearance

Zabiullah Mujahid, left, the spokesman for the Taliban government, speaks during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan
  • Mullah Hibatullah Akhundzada joined religious, tribal leaders at first loya jirga since Taliban takeover of Afghanistan
  • Gathering took place after number of ex-administration officials returned to Kabul following months of exile abroad

KABUL: The reclusive Taliban chief on Friday pardoned members of Afghanistan’s former Western-backed administration during a rare public appearance and joined thousands of religious and tribal leaders gathered in Kabul from throughout the country.

Some 3,500 representatives, including members of minorities, arrived in the Afghan capital on Thursday for the first loya jirga since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan last year, a grand assembly traditionally held by Afghans to reach a consensus on important political issues.

The conference took place after a number of former administration officials returned to Kabul following months of exile abroad and declared readiness to serve the country.

In Friday’s speech at the meeting’s venue, the Loya Jirga Tent at Kabul’s Polytechnic University, Taliban Supreme Leader Mullah Hibatullah Akhundzada said he had pardoned them but did not see their future in the country’s administration.

“I don’t hold them accountable for their past actions,” he told the loya jirga participants, the state-run Bakhtar News Agency reported.

“But amnesty doesn’t mean including them in the government.”

Most high-ranking officials left the country after its Western-backed government collapsed when the Taliban seized power in August, following the withdrawal of US-led forces after two decades of war.

Akhundzada has been the Taliban ultimate authority since 2016. Rarely seen in public, he has long kept a low profile. His last public appearance was in Kandahar city during Eid prayers in May, but the congregation could not see him and only heard his voice.

His direct appearance before the loya jirga participants was confirmed by government spokesmen and Abdul Wahid Rayan, the chief of Bakhtar News Agency.

“He sat on the stage facing the audience and gave his speech,” Rayan told Arab News.

During the Kabul gathering, Akhundzada called on investors to return to the country and gave them security assurances, saying that dependence on foreign aid could not revive the country’s economy.

Afghanistan has been facing an economic and humanitarian disaster since the Taliban takeover, which prompted the US and other donor states to cut off financial assistance, freeze the country’s $10 billion assets, and isolate it from the global banking system.

“I ask businessmen to come to Afghanistan without any fear and invest in making factories, because foreign aid will not help boost our economy,” Akhundzada said.

The loya jirga was called by the Taliban to forge national unity, as unacknowledged by foreign governments they have been under mounting pressure to form an inclusive government to win international recognition.

Prof. Naseer Ahmad Nawidy, political science lecturer at Salam University in Kabul, said Akhundzada’s speech had delivered, “clear messages about tolerance, unity, obedience, and solidarity to members of the Taliban while acknowledging their sacrifices.”

He told Arab News: “This is promising and will boost the confidence of the Taliban about their leadership.”

However, he added that no perspective was provided about the country’s future, including “women’s rights, girls’ education, economic opportunities, utilizing technical expertise of all Afghans in governance, and optimism to the youth.”


Arab Americans losing major benefits from US Census’ ‘discriminatory’ exclusion

Arab Americans losing major benefits from US Census’ ‘discriminatory’ exclusion
Updated 01 July 2022

Arab Americans losing major benefits from US Census’ ‘discriminatory’ exclusion

Arab Americans losing major benefits from US Census’ ‘discriminatory’ exclusion
  • No access to federal grants for minority business and congressional political empowerment programs, says Samer Khalaf, ADC national president
  • ‘Critical data needed for treatment of COVID-19, disability, mental health and other medical issues’

CHICAGO: The continued exclusion of Arab Americans from being counted in the decennial US Census is “another form of discrimination,” resulting in the loss of financial benefits and critical data needed for healthcare and other programs, according to Samer Khalaf, national president of the American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee.

During an interview on The Ray Hanania Show on the US Arab Radio Network and sponsored by Arab News, the ADC leader said that while he favors using the term “Arab” on the census, the community consensus to use MENA, or Middle East and North African, has the support of the Biden administration and cuts through the many divisions in the community.

Being excluded in the census, Khalaf said, has resulted in Arab Americans losing benefits — from receiving federal grants to being included in congressional political empowerment programs.

 

“It’s not just that we lost things. We never got anything that we were entitled to get. It’s not just a financial aspect. There hasn’t been a National Institute Health Study on the Arab community, ever. And the reason why is because there are no reliable data that can be used in the study because we are not counted. We have become the invisible minority,” Khalaf told Arab News.

“So, there are things other than financial that we are not getting. We don’t know what our COVID infection rates are. We don’t know what the percentage of our community is vaccinated because that data is simply not collected. It is beyond just financial detriment to our community. We have lost a lot of stuff … we don’t even realize.”

Khalaf emphasized: “It (the census exclusion) is discrimination because it is basically keeping us out of a lot of the programs that we think we are entitled to. Moreover, it is treating us as if we don’t exist. Literally as we don’t exist at all in this country and that is the biggest problem that we have.”

Khalaf said that over the years the diversity of the Arab world and Middle East has actually played against the US government embracing the term “Arab” as the possible designation on a future census, possibly in 2030. That’s why the emphasis has been on “MENA.”

 

“The ADC’s always number one preference is ‘Arab.’ That’s always been the case. We use the term and will use the term, and continue to use the term in the future. Our biggest (concern), again, what we thought the big picture was, is that as long as we were counted as a separate and distinct group, Arab (or) MENA, we just need to be counted,” Khalaf said.

“We want the issue to be transformed away from what (term is) to be used, to be that we are counted. Let’s step aside (from) the issue and what terms we are going to use and at least get the issue of being counted done and out of the way. That’s why we, as an organization, said fine. If it is going to be MENA, as long as we are counted, we are okay with that.”

Khalaf said that the Arab community has failed to receive its share of federal government support which ranges from funding to political recognition, and support for cultural and health programs. 

One example of how Arabs have been marginalized, Khalaf said, is in the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the pandemic’s impact on Arab Americans. He said that the government has instead asked the Arab community to gather the necessary community data that is needed to qualify Arab families and businesses for COVID-19 relief.

 

“One of the pushbacks we are getting from the federal government is … that there are no statistics, or there are no numbers as to how many Arab American businesses are there. Where are they located? Are they successful? They want to know from us do we have issues getting loans. Are our interest rates higher than others because of discrimination? That information is not available,” Khalaf said.

“They went to us and charged us to collect that information. So the ADC right now is doing a study. We are trying to collect data. We are asking Arab American business owners all over the country to fill out a questionnaire that we have on our website which is on ADCRI.org. 

“Business owners can go there and fill out a questionnaire. It will be anonymous so nobody knows who they are. But at least we can now get the data and take that data to the government and say hey look, here is the data we have for you. Now give us the minority business designation.”

“It changed and transformed the landscape. So we did see issues regarding our own businesses. We saw other problems develop because of COVID. And a lot of that had to do more or less with our community unable to sort of fully tap all the benefits that the federal government and state government are offering to the individuals. 

“And some of that was because of our own lack of knowledge. Some of it was because of the barrier to our language, language barriers. And some of it was the fact that as a community, we are not recognized. We are still classified as White. So we were (by) definition not even able to get some of those benefits.”

Khalaf said that exclusion from the census as “Arab” or “MENA” “holds us back,” and Arabs have become an “underserved community” when it comes to providing resources to address challenges that face all communities, including family services, domestic violence, disability, mental health and healthcare. 

“We are denied the resources for us to know how these issues impact our community and how serious they are,” he said.

Khalaf said that the Arab community came close to being fully included in the census during the administration of President Barack Obama, but noted that former president Donald Trump blocked it. President Joe Biden, he said, is “reviewing it.”

 

“Chances are it is going to happen. It is a matter of time. But we need to be vigilant,” Khalaf said.

“We need to hold the census and OMB — and don’t forget that the OMB is an important player in all of this, the Office of Management and Budget. OMB is the one that defines the classification, and we need to hold their feet to the fire and say this was a done deal and you were about to do it if not for the former administration.”

The Ray Hanania Show is broadcast live every Wednesday at 5 p.m. Eastern EST on WNZK AM 690 radio in Greater Detroit including parts of Ohio, and WDMV AM 700 radio in Washington DC including parts of Virginia and Maryland. The show is rebroadcast on Thursdays at 7 a.m. in Detroit on WNZK AM 690 and in Chicago at 12 noon on WNWI AM 1080.

You can listen to the radio podcast by visiting ArabNews.com/rayradioshow.


WHO: Monkeypox cases in Europe have tripled in last 2 weeks

WHO: Monkeypox cases in Europe have tripled in last 2 weeks
Updated 01 July 2022

WHO: Monkeypox cases in Europe have tripled in last 2 weeks

WHO: Monkeypox cases in Europe have tripled in last 2 weeks
  • “Urgent and coordinated action is imperative if we are to turn a corner in the race to reverse the ongoing spread of this disease,” Kluge said
  • More than 5,000 monkeypox cases have been reported from 51 countries worldwide

LONDON: The World Health Organization’s Europe chief warned Friday that monkeypox cases in the region have tripled in the last two weeks and urged countries to do more to ensure the previously rare disease does not become entrenched on the continent.
Dr. Hans Kluge said in a statement that increased efforts were needed despite the UN health agency’s decision last week that the escalating outbreak did not yet warrant being declared a global health emergency.
“Urgent and coordinated action is imperative if we are to turn a corner in the race to reverse the ongoing spread of this disease,” Kluge said.
To date, more than 5,000 monkeypox cases have been reported from 51 countries worldwide, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Kluge said the number of infections in Europe represents about 90 percent of the global total, noting that 31 countries in the WHO’s European region have now identified cases.
Kluge said data reported to the WHO show that 99 percent of cases have been in men — and that the majority of those have been in men that have sex with men. But he said there were now “small numbers” of cases among household contacts, including children. Most people reported symptoms including a rash, fever, fatigue, muscle pain, vomiting and chills.
Scientists warn anyone who is in close physical contact with someone who has monkeypox or their clothing or bedsheets is at risk of infection, regardless of their sexual orientation. Vulnerable populations like children and pregnant women are thought to be more likely to suffer severe disease.
About 10 percent of patients were hospitalized for treatment or to be isolated, and one person was admitted to an intensive care unit. No deaths have been reported.
Kluge said the problem of stigmatization in some countries might make some people wary of seeking health care and said the WHO was working with partners including organizers of pride events.
In the UK, which has the biggest monkeypox outbreak beyond Africa, officials have noted the disease is spreading in “defined sexual networks of men who have sex with men.” British health authorities said there were no signs suggesting sustained transmission beyond those populations.
A leading WHO adviser said in May that the spike in cases in Europe was likely tied to sexual activity by men at two rave parties in Spain and Belgium, speculating that its appearance in the bisexual community was a “random event.” British experts have said most cases in the UK involve men who reported having sex with other men in venues such as saunas and clubs.
Ahead of pride events in the UK this weekend, London’s top public health doctor asked people who have symptoms of monkeypox, like swollen glands or blisters, to stay home.
WHO Europe director Kluge appealed to countries to scale up their surveillance and genetic sequencing capacities for monkeypox so that cases could be quickly identified and measures taken to prevent further transmission. He said the procurement of vaccines “must apply the principles of equity.”
The main vaccine being used against monkeypox was originally developed for smallpox and the European Medicines Agency said earlier this week it was beginning to evaluate whether the shot should be authorized for monkeypox. The WHO has said supplies of the vaccine, made by Bavarian Nordic, are extremely limited.
Some countries including the UK and Germany have already begun vaccinating people at high-risk of monkeypox; the UK recently widened its immunization program to offer the shot to mostly men who have multiple sexual partners and are thought to be most vulnerable.
Until May, monkeypox had never been known to cause large outbreaks beyond Africa, where the disease is endemic in several countries and mostly causes limited outbreaks when it jumps to people from infected wild animals.
To date, there have been about 1,800 suspected monkeypox cases including more than 70 deaths in Africa. Vaccines have never been used to stop monkeypox outbreaks in Africa.
The WHO’s Africa office said this week that countries with vaccine supplies “are mainly reserving them for their own populations.”