Egyptian minister’s son faces murder charges over US double homicide

A San Francisco police officer steps out of the mobile command unit in Union Square on May 24, 2022 in San Francisco, California. (AFP)
A San Francisco police officer steps out of the mobile command unit in Union Square on May 24, 2022 in San Francisco, California. (AFP)
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Updated 28 May 2022

Egyptian minister’s son faces murder charges over US double homicide

A San Francisco police officer steps out of the mobile command unit in Union Square on May 24, 2022 in San Francisco, California
  • Ramy Hani Mounir Fahim, 26, eligible for death penalty over alleged killing of two men, officials say
  • Egypt Immigration and Expatriate Affairs Minister Nabila Makram issues statement, saying that her family is in ‘severe distress’

CHICAGO: The 26-year-old son of Egypt’s Minister of Immigration and Expatriate Affairs, Nabila Makram, is facing charges of premeditated murder over the killing of two men in California in April.

Ramy Hani Mounir Fahim, who lives in Irvine, California, has also been charged with two enhancements each of lying in wait and the personal use of a deadly weapon after a co-worker and his roommate were stabbed to death in their Anaheim apartment early last month.

The special circumstances of “lying in wait” and multiple murders make Fahim eligible for the death penalty, officials said.

Police allege that Fahim attacked and killed his co-worker, 23-year-old Griffin Cuomo, then killed Cuomo’s roommate, 23-year-old Jonathan Bahm, in their Anaheim apartment at about 6:30 a.m. on April 19, 2022.

Cuomo and Fahim worked together at an Orange County company, Pence Wealth Management. Fahim was a data engineer who had been employed as a research associate at the firm.

He is being held without bail at the Intake Release Center and was arraigned on May 6 at the North Justice Center in Fullerton, California.

According to investigators, a building security guard encountered Fahim on the apartment complex roof at midnight on April 18, just hours before the murders. Fahim was seen on the same floor of the victims’ apartment on the morning of the killings.

Fahim was still inside the victims’ apartment when Anaheim police responded to a 911 emergency call, Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer said.

“These young men were just starting to live out their dreams and find their places in the world. But an intruder who stalked them and then slashed them to death in their own home interrupted those dreams,” Spitzer said.

“The callous way that two young lives were ended cannot be ignored and we will do everything we can to ensure justice is served.”

Egypt’s Minister of Immigration and Expatriate Affairs, Nabila Makram, issued a statement on Facebook on Saturday, saying that she and her family are going through “a severe ordeal.”

In the statement, the minister’s first since Fahim was arrested on April 22, Makram called for prayers for her son and the two victims, and said that she will continue her duties as minister.

“My family and I are under severe distress following my son being charged with murder in the US. This charge is in front of a US court and a sentence has not yet been issued,” she said.

“Doing my duties as a minister in the Egyptian government does not conflict at all with me being a believing mother who bravely faces the plight of her son. Whatever the consequences, as a minister, I take full responsibility for my position and the requirements of working with it, and I clearly differentiate between what is personal and what is public.”

Fahim will remain in custody until a bail review hearing scheduled for June 17.


Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia

Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia
Updated 7 sec ago

Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia

Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia
  • The G20 includes Western countries that have accused Russia of war crimes in Ukraine, but also nations such as China, India, and South Africa that have remained neutral

JAKARTA: Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov will this week attend a meeting in Bali with his counterparts from the Group of 20 largest economies, officials confirmed on Wednesday, as host Indonesia tries to mediate rifts in the bloc over Moscow’s participation.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, one of the world’s breadbaskets, has delivered shockwaves to global supply chains and also stoked an energy crisis following international sanctions slapped on Moscow — a major oil and gas producer — which has also led to rising inflation in many countries.

The G20 includes Western countries that have accused Russia of war crimes in Ukraine, but also nations such as China, India, and South Africa that have remained neutral. The gathering will be the first time that foreign ministers of some of the world’s top economies have met Lavrov since the beginning of the invasion in late February.

Indonesia, which this year holds the rotating G20 presidency and has been facing pressure to exclude Russia from the summit scheduled to take place in November, is expecting a full attendance during the ministerial meeting on Friday.

“All G20 foreign ministers will be present in Bali,” Teuku Faizasyah, spokesperson for the Indonesian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, told Arab News.

Lavrov’s attendance was further confirmed by Denis Tetiushin, a spokesperson of the Russian Embassy in Jakarta, who told Arab News that the “agenda is the same for all the delegations,” including Russia’s.

Friday’s meeting comes after Indonesian President Joko Widodo’s trip last week to Kyiv and Moscow to meet Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and Russian President Vladimir Putin — both of whom have been invited to the November summit.

The G20 foreign ministers are expected to discuss ways to strengthen global collaboration and overcome the food crisis and global rise of commodity prices.

“With the new situation in Ukraine, issues related to food security will also be widely discussed at the G20 meetings,” the Indonesian Foreign Ministry said in a statement. “This meeting will serve as a strategic forum to discuss global recovery efforts.”

Indonesia has also invited non-member countries to attend this week’s meeting, including Ukraine. The Ukrainian ambassador in Jakarta, Vasyl Hamianin, told Arab News that Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba will join the meeting virtually and that the eastern European nation sees its participation “positively.”

He said: “The global agenda at present is closely related to what happens in Ukraine.”

In a G20 finance meeting in Washington in April, top officials from the UK, Canada, and the US walked out on Russian representatives. The reaction to Lavrov in Bali may provide an indication of how the bloc’s members will respond if Putin attends in person the summit in Bali later this year, which has not been confirmed.

On Lavrov’s attendance at the ministerial meetings, Hamianin said: “War criminals and officials representing terrorist states must not be allowed to appear at any authoritative and respected international fora.” He added that Lavrov was the minister of the state that was, “committing massive crimes against humanity in Ukraine.”


Facing severe drought, Somalia calls for Turkish support

Facing severe drought,  Somalia calls for Turkish support
Updated 14 min 29 sec ago

Facing severe drought, Somalia calls for Turkish support

Facing severe drought,  Somalia calls for Turkish support
  • Some areas of the Horn of Africa could be declared in famine within weeks because of the driest drought in the region in decades

ANKARA: Somalia’s president on Wednesday called for assistance from Turkey to combat the effects of severe drought that is threatening the Horn of Africa.

Hassan Sheikh Mohamud made the comments during his first visit to Turkey since returning to office following an election in May. The two countries have forged close ties over the past decade.

“The humanitarian situation caused by the drought was one of the issues we discussed in our meeting with (Turkish) President (Recep Tayyip) Erdogan,” Mohamud told reporters following a meeting with the Turkish leader.

He said: “I would like to take this opportunity to call upon our Turkish brothers to support us and do what they can, as they did before. Your solidarity and support will save the lives of the Somali people and will never be forgotten.”

Some areas of the Horn of Africa could be declared in famine within weeks because of the driest drought in the region in decades.

Russia’s war in Ukraine has abruptly drawn millions of dollars away from other crises and Somalia, facing a food shortage largely driven by the war, might be the most vulnerable.

Erdogan visited Somalia in 2011, amid a severe drought and devastating famine as Turkey sought to increase its influence in the Horn of Africa. The visit marked the start of Turkish humanitarian, development and infrastructure projects in Somalia. Turkey also established a military base in Somalia to train Somali soldiers.

“The Somali state and its people see Turkey and the Turkish people as true friends who support our efforts for development and stability in our country and stand by us,” Mohamud said in comments that were translated into Turkish.

Erdogan said Turkey’s humanitarian and development assistance to Somalia in the past decade has exceeded $1 billion.

Turkey has trained about 5,000 soldiers and 1,000 special forces police, he said, adding that Turkey would continue to support Somalia’s “stability and security.”


Brazilian ex-model, Peshmerga sniper killed in Russian airstrike

Brazilian ex-model, Peshmerga sniper killed in Russian airstrike
Updated 06 July 2022

Brazilian ex-model, Peshmerga sniper killed in Russian airstrike

Brazilian ex-model, Peshmerga sniper killed in Russian airstrike
  • Thalita do Valle had fought among Kurdish forces against Daesh in Iraq
  • 39-year-old was killed in Ukrainian city of Kharkiv

LONDON: A Brazilian former model who fought against Daesh in Iraq has been killed in a Russian airstrike in Ukraine, Metro newspaper reported on Wednesday.
Thalita do Valle, 39, was killed while serving in the city of Kharkiv on June 30. She had traveled to the conflict zone earlier in June with former Brazilian Army soldier Douglas Burigo, 40, who was also killed in last week’s airstrike.
Metro said Do Valle had experience in other warzones, including a period spent in Iraq fighting among Kurdish Peshmerga forces against the terror group Daesh, another conflict that attracted thousands of foreign volunteers.
She was given sniper training by Kurdish forces that were a key Western ally in the international coalition to defeat Daesh.


Putin's aide warns US against pressing for war crimes court

Putin's aide warns US against pressing for war crimes court
Updated 06 July 2022

Putin's aide warns US against pressing for war crimes court

Putin's aide warns US against pressing for war crimes court
  • Dmitry Medvedev denounced the US for what he described as its efforts to “spread chaos and destruction across the world for the sake of 'true democracy'"
  • “That's why the rotten dogs of war are barking in such a disgusting way"

MOSCOW: A top Kremlin official warned the U.S. Wednesday that it could face the “wrath of God” if it pursues efforts to help establish an international tribunal to investigate Russia's action in Ukraine.
The Russian lower house speaker urged Washington to remember that Alaska used to belong to Russia.
Dmitry Medvedev, the deputy secretary of Russia’s Security Council chaired by President Vladimir Putin, denounced the U.S. for what he described as its efforts to “spread chaos and destruction across the world for the sake of 'true democracy.'"
“The entire U.S. history since the times of subjugation of the native Indian population represents a series of bloody wars,” Medvedev charged in a long diatribe on his Telegram channel, pointing out the U.S. nuclear bombing of Japan during World War II and the war in Vietnam.
“Was anyone held responsible for those crimes? What tribunal condemned the sea of blood spilled by the U.S. there?”
Responding to the U.S.-backed calls for an international tribunal to prosecute the perceived war crimes by Russia in Ukraine, Medvedev rejected it as an attempt by the U.S. “to judge others while staying immune from any trial.”
“It won't work with Russia, they know it well,” Medvedev concluded. “That's why the rotten dogs of war are barking in such a disgusting way."
"The U.S. and its useless stooges should remember the words of the Bible: Do not judge and you will not be judged ... so that the great day of His wrath doesn't come to their home one day,” Medvedev said, referring to the Apocalypse.
He noted that the “idea to punish a country with the largest nuclear potential is absurd and potentially creates the threat to mankind's existence.”
The warning follows a series of tough statements from Putin and his officials that pointed at the Russian nuclear arsenals to warn the West against interfering with Moscow's action in Ukraine.
Medvedev, who served as Russia’s president in 2008-2012 when Putin shifted into the prime minister’s post due to term limits, was widely seen by the West as more liberal compared with his mentor. In recent months, however, he has remarks that have sounded much tougher than those issued by the most hawkish Kremlin officials.
In another blustery warning to the U.S., Vyacheslav Volodin, a longtime Putin aide who serves as the speaker of the lower house of parliament, warned Wednesday that Washington should remember that Alaska was part of Russia when it freezes Russian assets. Russia colonized Alaska and established several settlements there until the U.S. purchased it from Russia in 1867 for $7.2 million.
“When they attempt to appropriate our assets abroad, they should be aware that we also have something to claim back,” Volodin said during a meeting with lawmakers.


Germany eases path to permanent residency for migrants

Germany eases path to permanent residency for migrants
Updated 06 July 2022

Germany eases path to permanent residency for migrants

Germany eases path to permanent residency for migrants
  • The new regulation applies to about 136,000 people who have lived in Germany for at least five years
  • Those who qualify can first apply for a one-year residency status and subsequently apply for permanent residency

BERLIN: Tens of thousands of migrants, who have been living in Germany for years without long-lasting permission to remain in the country, will be eligible for permanent residency after the government approved a new migration bill Wednesday.
The new regulation, endorsed by the Cabinet, applies to about 136,000 people who have lived in Germany for at least five years by Jan. 1, 2022.
Those who qualify can first apply for a one-year residency status and subsequently apply for permanent residency in Germany.
They must earn enough money to make an independent living in the country, speak German and prove that they are “well integrated” into society.
Those under the age of 27 can already apply for a path to permanent residency in Germany after having lived in the country for three years.
“We want people who are well integrated to have good opportunities in our country," Interior Minister Nancy Faeser told reporters. “In this way, we also put an end to bureaucracy and uncertainty for people who have already become part of our society.”
The new migration regulation will also make it easier for asylum-seekers to learn German — so far only those with a realistic chance of receiving asylum in the country were eligible for language classes — with all asylum applicants getting the chance to enroll in classes.
For skilled laborers, such as information technology specialists and others that hold professions that are desperately needed in Germany, the new regulation will allow that they can move to Germany together with their families right away, which wasn’t possible before. Family members don't need to have any language skills before moving to the country.
“We need to attract skilled workers more quickly. We urgently need them in many sectors,” Faeser said. “We want skilled workers to come to Germany very quickly and gain a foothold here.”
The bill will also make it easier to deport criminals, includes extending detention pending deportation for certain offenders from three months to a maximum of six months. The extension is intended to give authorities more time to prepare for deportation, such as clarifying identity, obtaining missing papers and organizing a seat on an airplane, German news agency dpa reported.
“In the future, it will be easier to revoke the right of residence of criminals,” Faeser said. "For offenders, we will make it easier to order detention pending deportation, thus preventing offenders who are obliged to leave the country from going into hiding before being deported.”