Actress Jane Fonda says she has cancer

Actress Jane Fonda says she has cancer
Fonda first appeared on screen in 1960, and scored Academy Awards for best actress for “Klute” (1971) and “Coming Home” (1978). (AFP)
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Updated 03 September 2022

Actress Jane Fonda says she has cancer

Actress Jane Fonda says she has cancer

LOS ANGELES: US actress and activist Jane Fonda announced Friday that she has cancer, and has begun chemotherapy in her battle against the disease.
The 84-year-old Oscar winner, a prominent supporter of the Democratic Party, vowed to fight the “very treatable” illness.
“I’ve been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and have started chemo treatments,” she wrote on her verified Instagram account.
“This is a very treatable cancer. 80 percent of people survive, so I feel very lucky.
“I’m also lucky because I have health insurance and access to the best doctors and treatments.”
Fonda, an avowed environmentalist and social campaigner, said her position was more fortunate than that of many others in her situation.
“Almost every family in America has had to deal with cancer at one time or another and far too many don’t have access to the quality health care I am receiving and this is not right,” she wrote.
Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a kind of cancer that starts in the lymphatic system, a part of the body’s immune defenses, and can develop into widespread tumors.
According to the Mayo Clinic, symptoms can include: swollen lymph nodes, abdominal pain or swelling, chest pain, coughing or trouble breathing, as well as persistent fatigue and fever.
“In most instances, doctors don’t know what causes non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma,” the clinic says on its website.
“It begins when your body produces too many abnormal lymphocytes, which are a type of white blood cell.”
Usually those cells die, and the body creates new ones to replace them — but in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, they don’t, even as the body keeps making more.
“This oversupply of lymphocytes crowds into your lymph nodes, causing them to swell,” the clinic’s website states.
Fonda vowed that her treatment will not impede her environmental campaigning, and urged action on fossil fuel use, which she linked to cancer.
“I’m doing chemo for six months and am handling the treatments quite well and, believe me, I will not let any of this interfere with my climate activism.
“We’re living through the most consequential time in human history because what we do or don’t do right now will determine what kind of future there will be.
“I will not allow cancer to keep me from doing all I can, using every tool in my toolbox.”
She pointed to November midterm elections which could determine whether US President Joe Biden’s Democrats lose control of both houses of Congress, saying they were “beyond consequential.”
As a result, “you can count on me to be right there together with you as we grow our army of climate champions,” she wrote.
Fonda first appeared on screen in 1960, and scored Academy Awards for best actress for “Klute” (1971) and “Coming Home” (1978).
She has five other Oscar nominations in her career, four of them for best lead actress.
As well as anti-war activism during the US-Vietnam war that saw her dubbed “Hanoi Jane” and blacklisted in Hollywood, she was also a major figure in the home fitness video craze of the 1980s.
Fonda continues to work, and appears as the voice of an elegant dragon who is the CEO of a luck-making operation in the Apple TV+ animated movie “Luck.”
She also stars in the popular, long-running Netflix hit “Grace and Frankie.”
Fonda comes from a family of famous stars; her father Henry was a legend of the big screen appearing as the hold-out juror in “12 Angry Men,” and winning best actor for “On Golden Pond” (1981).
Her brother Peter was a seminal figure in 1960s counterculture, whose turn in “Easy Rider” is a touchstone of Hollywood history.


Iran’s ambassador to Madrid avoids shaking hands with Queen Letizia of Spain

Iran’s ambassador to Madrid avoids shaking hands with Queen Letizia of Spain
Updated 26 January 2023

Iran’s ambassador to Madrid avoids shaking hands with Queen Letizia of Spain

Iran’s ambassador to Madrid avoids shaking hands with Queen Letizia of Spain
  • Instead, Ghashghavi placed his hand on his chest and bowed slightly

LONDON: Iranian Ambassador to Spain Hassan Ghashghavi refrained from shaking hands with Queen Letizia during a reception on Wednesday for Madrid’s diplomatic corps at Zarzuela Palace.

In footage shared on Twitter, Ghashghavi shook hands with King Felipe VI but not Queen Letizia, who was standing beside him.

Royal fans, according to The Daily Mail, believe the Iranian ambassador’s gesture to be “disrespectful” and “awkward.”

Social media commentators, however, highlighted that his placing his right hand on his chest and slightly bowing to the queen instead showed he was following Iranian customs.

Others speculated that the queen’s lack of movement toward the Iranian diplomat suggested that she had been advised by her staff about her guest’s protocol.

In several Islamic cultures, physical contact with the opposite sex, including handshakes, is often discouraged or even prohibited.


US to test nuclear-powered spacecraft by 2027

US to test nuclear-powered spacecraft by 2027
Updated 25 January 2023

US to test nuclear-powered spacecraft by 2027

US to test nuclear-powered spacecraft by 2027
  • A trip to Mars from Earth using the technology could take roughly four months instead of some nine months with a conventional, chemically powered engine, engineers say

WASHINGTON: The United States plans to test a spacecraft engine powered by nuclear fission by 2027 as part of a long-term NASA effort to demonstrate more efficient methods of propelling astronauts to Mars in the future, the space agency’s chief said on Tuesday.
NASA will partner with the US military’s research and development agency, DARPA, to develop a nuclear thermal propulsion engine and launch it to space “as soon as 2027,” NASA administrator Bill Nelson said during a conference in National Harbor, Maryland.
The US space agency has studied for decades the concept of nuclear thermal propulsion, which introduces heat from a nuclear fission reactor to a hydrogen propellant in order to provide a thrust believed to be far more efficient than traditional chemical-based rocket engines.
NASA officials view nuclear thermal propulsion as crucial for sending humans beyond the moon and deeper into space. A trip to Mars from Earth using the technology could take roughly four months instead of some nine months with a conventional, chemically powered engine, engineers say.
That would substantially reduce the time astronauts would be exposed to deep-space radiation and would also require fewer supplies, such as food and other cargo, during a trip to Mars.
“If we have swifter trips for humans, they are safer trips,” NASA deputy administrator and former astronaut Pam Melroy said Tuesday.
The planned 2027 demonstration, part of an existing DARPA research program that NASA is now joining, could also inform the ambitions of the US Space Force, which has envisioned deploying nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft capable of moving other satellites orbiting near the moon, DARPA and NASA officials said.
DARPA in 2021 awarded funds to General Atomics, Lockheed Martin and Jeff Bezos’ space company Blue Origin to study designs of nuclear reactors and spacecraft. By around March, the agency will pick a company to build the nuclear spacecraft for the 2027 demonstration, the program’s manager Tabitha Dodson said in an interview.
The joint NASA-DARPA effort’s budget is $110 million for fiscal year 2023 and is expected to be hundreds of millions of dollars more through 2027.

 


New Zealand’s next PM known for his candour, diet, and poor dress sense

New Zealand’s next PM known for his candour, diet, and poor dress sense
Updated 27 January 2023

New Zealand’s next PM known for his candour, diet, and poor dress sense

New Zealand’s next PM known for his candour, diet, and poor dress sense
  • He was arrested and strip-searched in the late 1990s while protesting proposed reforms to university education

WELLINGTON: New Zealand's next prime minister does not draw adoring crowds like his predecessor Jacinda Ardern, but is well known throughout the country for his political nous, poor dress sense and a love of diet Coke.
Chris Hipkins, 44, was on Wednesday morning officially sworn in to replace Ardern, his friend of more than 20 years, who resigned because she no longer had "enough in the tank".
The straight-talking Hipkins was the architect of New Zealand's Covid-19 response, and is widely seen as a personable politician with a safe pair of hands.
"Hopefully New Zealanders know me as someone who is upfront, doesn't mind admitting when they've made a mistake and can laugh at themselves," he told reporters after being touted for the role last week.
Hipkins has somewhat mellowed since his early days as a firebrand of student politics.
He was arrested and strip-searched in the late 1990s while protesting proposed reforms to university education.
Political commentator Josie Pagani has described Hipkins, with more than 14 years in opposition and government, as "sensible, likeable, tough and capable".
He will now be tasked with turning around the sagging popularity of Ardern's Labour government, which has been hampered by a looming recession and a resurgent conservative opposition.
Hipkins won plaudits for his near two-year term as the Covid response minister in a country that shut its borders to keep the coronavirus out, only fully reopening to the outside world in August last year.
Hailing from the working class Hutt Valley in New Zealand's North Island, Hipkins has held high-profile portfolios including police and education.
"I think I am relatively upfront, I'm relatively inclusive. People won't die wondering what I think," he has said.
"My parents came from relatively humble beginnings and worked really hard to provide a good life for my brother and I."
His diet has drawn the attention of his colleagues, with a former boss once remarking that Hipkins "appears to eat nothing more than sausage rolls and diet Coke".
Justice Minister Kiri Allan, one of Labour's senior Maori MPs, who had been considered a potential prime minister herself, has described Hipkins as decisive and an "incredibly strong" leader.
"He is extremely competent, with a track record of delivering for New Zealand as one of our most senior ministers over the past six years," she said.
Hipkins told journalists he liked cycling, gardening, DIY work and being outdoors, but conceded: "Maybe I don't have the best fashion sense in parliament."
Asked whether having a red-haired prime minister would be a historic moment for the country, he said: "I think it was about time we had a ginger at the top."
The incoming New Zealand leader studied politics and criminology at Victoria University in the capital Wellington and then worked in the industry training sector.
Before becoming an MP in 2008, he worked as a senior adviser to two education ministers and former prime minister Helen Clark.
Although known as a personable and laid-back operator, Hipkins is also capable of playing hard-nosed politics -- and was involved in some high-profile spats with Australia's former conservative government.
In 2021, he accused Australia of "exporting its garbage" to New Zealand -- a reference to Canberra's controversial policy of deporting criminals back to their country of birth.
Hipkins was admonished by Ardern in 2017 after he was accused of orchestrating the resignation of Australia's then-deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce.
Information released to Hipkins showed Joyce was a dual citizen of both Australia and New Zealand -- which disqualified him from sitting in parliament under Australia's constitution.

 


US venture capital firm launches Riyadh-based accelerator program

US venture capital firm launches Riyadh-based accelerator program
Updated 24 January 2023

US venture capital firm launches Riyadh-based accelerator program

US venture capital firm launches Riyadh-based accelerator program
  • Program focuses on startups in MENA that are growing their businesses

RIYADH: Techstars, a US venture capital firm, announced a new partnership to continue the Techstars Riyadh Accelerator in collaboration with the Saudi Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, Raed Ventures and the National Bank of Saudi Arabia. 

The accelerator focuses on startups in the Middle East and North Africa that are establishing and growing their businesses, with the goal of paving the way for future innovation in the region’s digital economy. 

“I am very excited about the growth of the startup ecosystem in the Kingdom, and between the Kingdom’s investment in entrepreneurship and its pivotal location, Riyadh can attract global emerging talent to the entire region,” Techstars CEO Maëlle Gavet said. 

“The best entrepreneurs can influence the world no matter where they are, and part of what we do at Techstars is help them connect their innovations to the rest of the world,” Gavet added.

Abdullah Al-Shamrani, director of digital entrepreneurship at the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, emphasized the importance of technological and innovative entrepreneurship in achieving Vision 2030. 

The accelerator is accepting applications for a 13-week program from June to September 2023. Funding and fundraising opportunities, as well as curated workshops and resources, will be available to each company. Participants will also benefit from a network of mentors from the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, the National Bank of Saudi Arabia and Raed Ventures.

 


16th Al-Dhafra Festival starts Sunday

16th Al-Dhafra Festival starts Sunday
Updated 21 January 2023

16th Al-Dhafra Festival starts Sunday

16th Al-Dhafra Festival starts Sunday
  • Festival continues until Feb. 2 as part of Abu Dhabi’s camel beauty contest season
  • Organizing committee chairman hails UAE leadership’s support for heritage preservation projects

AL-DHAFRA, UAE: Competitions and activities of the 16th Al-Dhafra Festival begin on Sunday as part of Abu Dhabi’s camel beauty contest season.
The festival, held under the patronage of UAE President Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, will continue until Feb. 2 in Madinat Zayed, the Emirates News Agency reported on Saturday.
Organized by the Abu Dhabi Cultural Programs and Heritage Festival committee, with strategic partner ADNOC, the festival aims to preserve and develop heritage activities, and enable camel owners to continue the tradition of breeding and caring for camels.
The festival also highlights the camel’s role in Emirati and Gulf culture.
Faris Khalaf Al-Mazrouei, the committee chairman, hailed the UAE leadership’s support for heritage preservation projects and festivals.
He also praised the leadership’s support for falconry competitions, and purebred Arabian horse and heritage competitions, which make the capital a unique role model in the field of organizing heritage festivals.
Al-Mazrouei said that since its first edition in 2008, the festival has been a key pillar in preserving Emirati heritage and traditions for generations to come.