Arab hopefuls miss out as Miss USA named Miss Universe in New Orleans

Arab hopefuls miss out as Miss USA named Miss Universe in New Orleans
Miss USA was unveiled as the latest beauty queen. (AFP)
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Updated 19 January 2023

Arab hopefuls miss out as Miss USA named Miss Universe in New Orleans

Arab hopefuls miss out as Miss USA named Miss Universe in New Orleans

DUBAI: The only two Arab contestants at the 71st Miss Universe pageant, held in New Orleans, narrowly missed out on making the top 16 as Miss USA R'Bonney Gabriel was unveiled as the latest beauty queen.

Former title holder Miss Universe 2021 Harnaaz Sandhu of India crowned her successor in a glittering ceremony at the New Orleans Morial Convention Center.

Contestants from over 84 countries were whittled down to just 16 as the only two contestants from the Middle East — Miss Universe Bahrain Evlin Abdullah Khalifa and Miss Universe Lebanon Yasmina Zaytoun — did not make the cut.

Over the course of Saturday night’s final competition the contestants were narrowed down to just three hopefuls from the Dominican Republic, the US and Venezuela.




(AFP)

“I’m scared and nervous because of the uncertainties that this night will bring but at the same time I am hopeful and inspired to know that I have so many young kids looking up to me, cheering for me to do well and believing in me that I can achieve my dream of becoming the first Miss Universe from the Arabian Gulf countries,” Abdullah Khalifa said on Instagram before the final 16 was unveiled.




 Miss Dominican Republic Andreína Martínez, Miss Curaçao Gabriela Dos Santos, Miss Puerto Rico Ashley Carino, Miss USA R'Bonney Gabriel and Miss Venezuela Amanda Dudamel. (AFP)

Despite not gracing the finals’ stage, Abdullah Khalifa and Zaytoun did cause a stir during the preliminary round of the competition.

For the swimsuit competition on Wednesday, 24-year-old Abdullah Khalifa graced the stage wearing a hot pink burkini with a cape that had the word “equality” written on it in Arabic.  

The cape also featured text that read “Arab women should be represented” on one side and on the other side said: “A Muslim women can also become Miss Universe.”  

As part of the preliminary competition, the Bahraini Russian pianist participated in an evening gown round. She wore a glitzy form-fitting dress with a matching hood designed by Filipino couturier Furne One. 

For the national costume presentation, Abdullah Khalifa wore a gold ensemble, by One, that featured a structured trailing cape. She completed her look with a dangling gold headpiece.  

“This costume represents the golden celebration of the establishment of Bahrain as a nation,” said the host as Abdullah Khalifa walked the stage. “The smallest country in the Middle East is among the richest in the world.”  

Meanwhile, Zaytoun also made waves at the competition. 

For the evening gown round, she wore a heavily embellished metallic gown designed by Lebanese couturier Charbel Zoe. 

For the national costume competition, she wore a custom-made gold and green bodysuit inspired by Lebanon’s cedar tree, which was also designed by Zoe.

“The bodysuit is made of metal characterizing a female worrier who believes in bringing strength to a war zone country,” the host said as Zaytoun walked on stage. 


Dutch DJ Martin Garrix performs at Formula E Diriyah E-Prix 

Dutch DJ Martin Garrix performs at Formula E Diriyah E-Prix 
Updated 28 January 2023

Dutch DJ Martin Garrix performs at Formula E Diriyah E-Prix 

Dutch DJ Martin Garrix performs at Formula E Diriyah E-Prix 

DUBAI: Dutch DJ Martin Garrix hit the stage on Friday at Formula E Diriyah E-Prix in Saudi Arabia to perform to a packed audience. 

The “Animals” artist, who was ranked number one on DJ Mag’s Top 100 DJs list for three consecutive years, played remixes for “Shakes,” “Summer Days” and many more. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ali Assi (@loush_official)

Fans in the Kingdom danced, cheered and held up signs to support the DJ. 

One of the posters read: “Martin on, world off.”   

Egyptian singer Mahmoud El-Esseily also met his fans at the event. “I am very happy to be here today. We will light up the stage, won’t we?” he told his fans. 

He sang some of his hits: “Helm Baeed,” “Ekhteraa” and “El-Leila.” 

Fans were also treated to a drone show and colorful fireworks. 

The event also presented local talent, including Saudi Lebanese record producer DJ Loush, whose real name is Ali Assi.  

The audience sang along with him to “Staying Alive,” “The Business” and “Do It To It.” 


Saudi writer, director and producer Ali Al-Kalthami talks success  

Saudi writer, director and producer Ali Al-Kalthami talks success  
Updated 28 January 2023

Saudi writer, director and producer Ali Al-Kalthami talks success  

Saudi writer, director and producer Ali Al-Kalthami talks success  
  • As one of the co-founders of Telfaz11, the writer-director-producer is now reaping the rewards of years spent establishing an authentic entertainment industry in the Kingdom 

DUBAI: Ali Al-Kalthami is trying not to let it all go to his head. But that’s easier said than done. As one of the three co-founders of the pioneering Saudi production company Telfaz11, Al-Kalthami is one of the pillars of the Kingdom’s film future. And, as we’ve seen over the last two months, that future is now.  

In that short span of time, Telfaz11’s film “Raven Song” became the latest Saudi submission to the Academy Awards, their theatrical release “Sattar” became the highest-grossing Saudi film in history, and their latest feature, “Al Khallat+,” just became the first Netflix original film from Saudi.   

“This is not overnight success, of course,” Al-Kalthami explains to Arab News. “It’s been 12 years of experience, 12 years of staying true to our stories, our philosophy, and our talents. We’re grateful that all of these projects are flourishing at the same time, but we’ve been working a long time for these things to take place, and we’re most proud that we got here by doing it the right way — doing it our way.” 

A still from “Sattar.” (Supplied)

We’re speaking to the writer/director/producer over Zoom and he doesn’t want to turn his camera on. It’s nothing personal, he explains, he’s just been filming for 12 hours straight, directing his upcoming theatrical feature “Night Courier,” a dark crime comedy, in Riyadh and he doesn’t want anyone to see him. His mood, however, belies his exhaustion — he’s still thrilled to gush about “Al Khallat+,” perhaps the Telfaz11 project that is closest to his heart.  

The film is a continuation of the 22-episode anthology web series he created, which has amassed an astounding 1.5 billion views — a viewership far too big to qualify this as a ‘cult hit.’ Rather, Al-Kalthami and co., through their years of viral YouTube videos, have defined what Saudi Arabia’s mainstream entertainment looks like, building grassroots support with content that is wholeheartedly Saudi, made with a love and authenticity that allows them to push boundaries and subvert expectations, an aesthetic that is defined in “Al-Khallat.”  

“From the start, I thought about doing a show that reflects the Saudi psyche. We wanted to capture everyday life in a way that that appeals to real people with engaging, well-crafted storytelling,” the creator explains. 

While “Al Khallat+” tells a number of unrelated stories — two thieves crash a wedding to rescue their captured partner, a chef risks his restaurant trying to save his parent’s marriage, a mother searches for her husband who in turn is searching for his son in a nightclub — they each share a defining theme, one that Al-Kalthami and his collaborators discovered while holed up writing together during COVID-19 lockdowns. 

Director Fahad Alammari on the set of “Al Khallat.” (Supplied)

“We went back to the 22 episodes we’d released on the internet, and wanted to figure out what worked and what didn’t as we started to work on the feature. And for some strange reason, we found that the stories that worked had something in common. In each of them, there was a character who had to hustle their way out of an issue brought on by society’s restrictions — and we don’t mean that negatively,” Al-Kalthami says.  

“If you think about Saudi Arabia as a largely conservative society, that comes with a lot of rules that cause restraints on social life. Watching people hustle around those restraints becomes funny, because people can relate to those situations. We approach it with a very local mindset, and that allows Saudis to come along for the ride with us.” 

While “Al Khallat” has a perspective purely his own, Al-Kalthami is always quick to give credit to his collaborators. If he is proud of anything personally, it’s that he’s created a platform which has allowed the Kingdom’s rising talent to thrive, from the myriad actors featured to the crew behind the camera, many of whom he has known for years.  

“When I saw the first edit, I was very emotional. I was able to see in front of my eyes so clearly all the ideas that we’d written come to life through such great production. Fahad Alammari, the director, executed this so well, for example, and seeing all these actors — all of my friends — having fun bringing these characters to life is so rewarding,” says Al-Kalthami. 

“From the beginning, I always wanted this to go somewhere beyond the internet. I had no other experience at the time, but I knew we would get there eventually. To have something that I created with my friends get picked up and treated as a franchise is very humbling.” 

The challenge that Al-Kalthami now faces is to keep pushing forward and rewriting the template that he and his collaborators have made.  

“As a writer, you often create this illusion around yourself when you create something successful. If you’re not careful, there’s a barrier that rises between you and reality. You have to force yourself not to believe the hype, to be true to who you are and true to the society you live in — and force yourself to keep living in it. You can’t isolate yourself and become carried away by your success,” he says. “You have to embrace life, and live like a normal person, and get inspired the right way. I’m always trying to force myself to stay grounded, which can be very tricky with this kind of success, especially when you’re in on the ground floor. You have to force yourself to continue to push the envelope, break boundaries and do great work, and you have to help build this industry the right way. That’s the responsibility of pioneers.” 

While Al-Kalthami is usually focused on the future — committed to pushing himself as a writer and helping Saudi talent flourish both within his own projects and theirs — he does, occasionally, allow himself to look back and take stock of all he and Telfaz11 have accomplished over the last dozen years. Often, the emotion hits when he least expects it. 

“Somebody sent me a TikTok video last week. In it, someone had put together pictures of all the Telfaz11 founders, filmmakers and family members, spanning every moment they could find from 2010 to 2022. They wrote that we were the voice of our local inner life, that we were filmmakers that Saudis believe in. It was just so poetic, so nice, and so innocent. It just really got to me,” Al-Kalthami says. “I was so overwhelmed, I could hardly control it. To know that a lot of people in Saudi feel we represent their voice, their authentic life, truly means everything.” 


ULTRA Abu Dhabi music festival releases lineup of headliners for debut edition

ULTRA Abu Dhabi music festival releases lineup of headliners for debut edition
Updated 28 January 2023

ULTRA Abu Dhabi music festival releases lineup of headliners for debut edition

ULTRA Abu Dhabi music festival releases lineup of headliners for debut edition

LONDON: The international music festival, ULTRA Worldwide, has announced the first wave of headliners set to play the inaugural edition of ULTRA Abu Dhabi on March 4-5 at Etihad Park.

“Multi-award winning and platinum-record selling artist Afrojack is no stranger to headlining ULTRA Main Stages across the world, and will be on hand to deliver yet another high-octane set,” organizers said.

“Responsible for some of the biggest hits in the world, Grammy-nominated Calvin Harris will bring the beats to Yas Island for one of his signature high-energy sets (and) Dharma Worldwide boss KSHMR will whip the crowd into a frenzy with his culture-crossing sonics,” they also said.

Gud Vibrations label co-founder NGHTMRE will appear on the Main Stage with his signature blend of electronic music and producer Skrillex, who has won eight Grammy Awards — more than any other electronic dance music artist, will bring his shapeshifting soundscapes to the festival.

ULTRA Abu Dhabi will also host ULTRA’s underground techno and house concept RESISTANCE, featuring Drumcode founder and Swedish techno titan Adam Beyer.

“Producer and EXHALE label boss Amelie Lens will return to the Middle East to deliver her mesmerising blend of techno, while British legends Sasha_John Digweed bring decades of dance floor expertise to Abu Dhabi,” they added.

Etihad Park, located on Yas Island, is the largest open-air venue in the region and one of the world’s fastest growing leisure and entertainment destinations.

“ULTRA Worldwide sets the benchmark when it comes to delivering the ultimate festival experience, combining top-tier talent, cutting-edge technology and large-scale productions,” the statement said, adding: “As the most international music festival brand boasting active events on all six inhabited continents, it’s no surprise that ULTRA Worldwide’s Middle East debut will be one of the most highly anticipated events across the UAE this year.”

The three-day festival will offer a premium general experience pass that allows access holders to dedicated entrance gates, toilets, food and beverage stands, as well as a private lounge area. It will also offer VVIP passes at both stages.


Potential Omani bishop’s palace uncovered near Christian monastery on UAE’s Siniyah Island 

Potential Omani bishop’s palace uncovered near Christian monastery on UAE’s Siniyah Island 
Updated 27 January 2023

Potential Omani bishop’s palace uncovered near Christian monastery on UAE’s Siniyah Island 

Potential Omani bishop’s palace uncovered near Christian monastery on UAE’s Siniyah Island 
  • Archeologists uncover possible Omani bishop’s palace near Umm Al-Quwain’s recently discovered Christian monastery

DUBAI: Fresh findings by archeologists suggest the existence of a possible bishop’s palace — potentially Omani — near a recently discovered Christian monastery on the UAE’s Siniyah Island, off the coast of the state of Umm Al-Quwain.

A series of walls and rooms were uncovered last year that intrigued archeologists and historians involved in the excavation process on Siniyah Island, according to Tim Power, an archeology professor at UAE University.  

“This year, we came back to expand the trenches to try to understand what’s going on there,” said Power. (AN Photo/Maria Botros)

“It seems that we really have an interesting building that might be interpreted as an abbot’s house or perhaps even a bishop’s palace,” he continued.  

The archeology professor explained that similar buildings had been found in the Arabian Gulf over the years, which has helped historians and archeologists create parallels.  

Power added that recently what is thought to be a bishop’s palace was uncovered in Bahrain that had similar characteristics to the structure discovered on Siniyah Island.  

The newly discovered structure on Siniyah Island believed to be a bishop's palace. (AN Photo/Maria Botros)

“Historical sources, in particular the acts of the synods of the Nestorian church, mention a bishop of Oman between the fifth and seventh centuries,” said Power.  

Oman during that period included the region that later became the northern emirates of the UAE, so it is possible this was the actual palace of a bishop, he added.  

This year, the focus has shifted to excavating a different part of the island, with extensive work carried out on settlements and other structures surrounding the monastery.  

Findings on the island suggest the presence of both Christian and Muslim communities, who are believed to have coexisted during a period of time.  

They also shed light on the transition from late antiquity to early Islam, just before the Arab conquest.  

Power, who was invited by the Tourism and Archeology Department of Umm Al-Quwain to put together a “dream team of leading experts,” chose individuals who can contribute to the project.  

“The goal of this season will be to outline the context of the monastery so it’s not just an isolated structure in the middle of this sand pit,” said Michele Degli Esposti, a researcher at the Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures of the Polish Academy of Sciences.  

(AN Photo/Maria Botros)

Esposti, who sat categorizing artifacts and materials found during the dig, explained why the site of the alleged bishop’s palace was different than other structures.  

“This area, contrary to what happens in the settlement, is quite poor in material remains,” he said.  

“One reason is that the core complex, which had a very nice plaster floor, was constantly kept swept and clean, so we found very little materials left behind.”  

A possible warehouse was found in the vicinity of the structure thought to be the bishop’s palace, containing further clues for archeologists to draw conclusions.  

“The bulk of the materials are made of pottery, quite remarkable quantities of glass as seen in the settlements, and a few stone vessels, which are quite interesting,” said Esposti. (AN Photo/Maria Botros)

Radiocarbon dating used to assess the pottery excavated suggests that the community believed to have occupied the island was there between the seventh and eighth centuries.  

Esposti said similar methodologies will be used to determine the age of the objects recently found to further narrow down the window of the predicted time period.  

Findings will allow archeologists and researchers to better understand the pattern of occupation in the new site discovered on the island in order to draw relevant conclusions. (AN Photo/Maria Botros)

The excavation process, which has a more multidisciplinary approach, involves experts and materials from around the world to aid archeologists on site. 

It is also the first time that TAD UAQ is hosting students from the New York University of Abu Dhabi to participate in the excavation process.  

Hoor Al-Mazrouei, an Emirati biology student at NYUAD, participated in the excavations taking place in the settlements where she helped find a pot potentially used for cooking.   

“While we were digging, we found that it doesn’t have a base, and that’s probably why it’s not used for storage but used for baking bread or used as a cooking base,” said Al-Mazrouei. (AN Photo/Maria Botros)

NYUAD students were involved in the process from Jan. 4-20, alongside archeologists from TAD UAQ such as Ammar Al-Banna.  

Al-Banna, who predicts that the island will welcome visitors in the foreseeable future, said the first step is to uncover all findings to proceed.  

“By uncovering them, we hope to understand why they are here and what the relationship between all the structures and the sites next to them is,” he said. “Of course, with the finds, some will be studied, some will be exhibited.”  

Excavation work on the island will continue until March and will end before the Ramadan fast begins.  

Siniyah Island’s monastery is the second to be found in the UAE, with the first discovered in Abu Dhabi’s Sir Bani Yas Island in the 1990s.


Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 

Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 
Updated 27 January 2023

Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 

Arab celebrities star in Hugo Boss’s new campaign 

DUBAI: Germany fashion label Hugo Boss has released a star-studded spring/summer 2023 campaign, featuring Arab celebrities. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by BOSS (@boss)

The massive digital campaign features US Palestinian producer DJ Khaled, Dutch Palestinian model Gigi Hadid, Syrian Olympic swimmer Yusra Mardini, Lebanese influencer and entrepreneur Karen Wazen, Emirati host Anas Bukhash, Lebanese-Australian model and humanitarian Jessica Kahawaty and Iraqi para-athlete Zainab Al-Eqabi. 

In the new advert, each of the stars shared a photo collage featuring two images — one from their childhood and one present-day photo while wearing Boss sweatshirts or blazers from the new collection.

According to the brand, the new collection showcases a bold aesthetic, combining a city-inspired spirit with a summery, off-court lifestyle in the brand’s signature color palette of black, white and camel. 

The campaign aims “to inspire the world to live up to its full potential,” the brand’s statement said. “The journey to living life on one’s own terms, begins with finding one’s power, purpose, and perseverance. Despite its highs and lows, twists and turns, the journey is lived with confidence, style, and a forward-looking vision.” 

The campaigns stars celebrities, photographers, entrepreneurs, social advocates and more. Each of the stars will take to their own social media channels to share their inspiring stories.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by BOSS (@boss)

Lensed by Swedish photographer Mikael Jansson, the campaign also stars A-list celebrities, sports personalities and influencers including Demi Lovato, Pairs Hilton, Maluma, Bella Throne, Naomi Campbell, Lee Minho, Khaby Lame, Matteo Berrettini, Anne-Marie, BamBam, Stella Maxwell, Stefflon Don, Macaulay Culkin, Christina, Naomi Watanabe, NikkieTutorials, Cameron Dallas, Aaron Rose Philip, Gottmik, Ox Zung, Nic Kaufmann, Akam, Paola Locatelli, Juanpa Zurita, David Dobrik, Richarlison, Karl-Anthony Towns, Fernando Alonso, Xavi Simons, Aleksander Aamodt Kilde, Suresh Raina, Anthony Santos and Zaire Wade.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by BOSS (@boss)

The stars all tagged their posts: “‘BOSSES AREN’T BORN, THEY’RE MADE’ @boss #beyourownboss.”

“Conviction, effort, and faith in the process. BOSSes aren’t born. They’re made,” the brand shared on its Instagram account.