Pregnant woman who escaped Khartoum gives birth to ‘miracle’ baby in Cairo

Pregnant woman who escaped Khartoum gives birth to ‘miracle’ baby in Cairo
The mother and daughter set out on a dangerous four-day journey from Khartoum to the Egyptian border, traveling by lorry, bus and taxi (AFP)
Short Url
Updated 29 May 2023
Follow

Pregnant woman who escaped Khartoum gives birth to ‘miracle’ baby in Cairo

Pregnant woman who escaped Khartoum gives birth to ‘miracle’ baby in Cairo
  • Seeking to join her husband in UK as a refugee
  • Home Office accused of life-threatening delays

LONDON: A pregnant woman who was shot, escaped an overturned car and walked for hours from Khartoum to reach the Egyptian border has given birth to a “miracle” baby, The Guardian reported on Sunday.

The 25-year-old woman and her husband are Eritrean refugees. Her husband was given refugee status in the UK, and applied to the Home Office for a refugee family reunion visa in February 2022, the newspaper reported.

The woman with her 3-year-old daughter were stuck in the Sudanese capital when the conflict began. Their home was hit by shelling and they struggled to access food, water and medical treatment. The woman then decided to seek refuge in Egypt.

“We didn’t tell our daughter anything about the war in Khartoum because we didn’t want to frighten her,” the husband told The Guardian.

He continued: “She could hear the sound of gunfire in Khartoum but my wife told her not to worry because it was just fireworks.

“My wife and daughter had to leave everything behind when they escaped from Khartoum.

 “My wife just took our marriage certificate and my daughter took one small bear with her she called Mohammed. She asked to name her little brother after her bear.”

The mother and daughter set out on a dangerous four-day journey from Khartoum to the Egyptian border, traveling by lorry, bus and taxi.

During their trip, a wheel came off the car they were traveling in and overturned, The Guardian reported. While some of the passengers were injured, the two were unharmed and were able to bargain a price for continuing their journey in another car.

The two then walked for several hours from Port Sudan to the border crossing in the middle of the night.

The woman gave birth to a healthy baby boy in a Cairo hospital on Wednesday, The Guardian reported.

The husband, who is urgently trying to bring his family to the UK, has accused the Home Office of putting their lives at risk as a result of long delays.

Since 2019, the number of refugees resettled in the UK has fallen by 75 percent, while family reunion visas are 40 percent lower than pre-pandemic levels.

When the couple first applied for a family reunion visa, the usual processing period was 12 weeks, The Guardian reported. However, when the family’s lawyer inquired about the delay in February, 12 months after the application was submitted, the Home Office said they were facing “considerable delays” in family reunion approvals and would be unable to provide an updated time frame for a decision.

“I hope the family reunion visa application will be processed very soon,” the husband said.

 He added: “The safe arrival of our baby is a miracle and he is a sign of hope for the future.

 “I had to pay a lot of money for the journey out of Khartoum to bring my wife and daughter to safety but money comes and money goes … only life matters.”

 

 


Egyptian guard killed in shooting on Rafah border, Israel and Egypt investigating

The Israeli army said it took “operational control” of the Palestinian side of the Rafah border crossing on May 7. (File/AFP)
The Israeli army said it took “operational control” of the Palestinian side of the Rafah border crossing on May 7. (File/AFP)
Updated 53 min 18 sec ago
Follow

Egyptian guard killed in shooting on Rafah border, Israel and Egypt investigating

The Israeli army said it took “operational control” of the Palestinian side of the Rafah border crossing on May 7. (File/AFP)
  • Israel’s military had earlier said it was investigating reports of an exchange of fire between Israeli and Egyptian soldiers

JERUSALEM/CAIRO: A member of Egypt’s security forces was killed in a shooting incident near the Rafah border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip and an investigation is under way, Egypt’s military spokesperson said in a statement on Monday.
Israel’s military had earlier said it was investigating reports of an exchange of fire between Israeli and Egyptian soldiers.
“A few hours ago (Monday), a shooting incident occurred on the Egyptian border. The incident is under review and discussions are being held with the Egyptians,” the Israeli military said in a statement.
Israel seized control of the Rafah border crossing from the Gaza side of the border earlier this month as it stepped up its military offensive in the area, drawing criticism from Egypt.


Gaza hospitals operating in ‘medieval’ conditions: UK doctor

Paramedics transport a body at the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital in Deir Al-Balah following Israeli bombardment on May 23, 2024.
Paramedics transport a body at the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital in Deir Al-Balah following Israeli bombardment on May 23, 2024.
Updated 27 May 2024
Follow

Gaza hospitals operating in ‘medieval’ conditions: UK doctor

Paramedics transport a body at the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Hospital in Deir Al-Balah following Israeli bombardment on May 23, 2024.
  • Dawas described dire conditions in Gaza, with medical staff operating virtually without supplies, power supplies intermittent and patients lying on the floor

BRUSSELS: Gaza hospitals are reduced to practicing “medieval medicine,” a British surgeon recently returned from the bombarded Palestinian territory said on Monday.
“It’s absolutely true to describe it as medieval medicine. It is what you would hear about or read about what would be happening in Europe maybe 300, 400 years ago,” Dr. Khaled Dawas, head of gastrointestinal surgery at University College London Hospitals, told AFP in an interview.
Dawas described dire conditions in Gaza, with medical staff operating virtually without supplies, power supplies intermittent and patients lying on the floor.
He returned at the end of April from his two-week stint to help overstretched Palestinian hospital surgeons — his second wartime stay there, following one in January.
“By April they were seeing this constant, constant volume of dying and dead bodies coming into the hospitals and any human wouldn’t be able to tolerate it,” he said.
“They carry on working, but you can see the effect of that. They’re all extremely burdened by what they’re doing.”
The 54-year-old surgeon, an Arabic-speaker who has Palestinian parents, said many people in Gaza wounded or needing other medical attention tried to avoid going to the hospitals because it “means pretty much a death sentence.”
That was “because of the wound infections, because of the conditions.”
While the doctor said he felt “guilt” about leaving Gaza to return to his regular British medical work, from which he had taken leave, he said he would be back.
“I do hope that when I go back next time, that it’ll be when the ceasefire is in place. Because watching it unfold when you’re there is unbearable,” he said.
“It becomes more unbearable when you leave, actually, when you think back on what you’ve seen and what you’ve heard. And you wonder how people, any human being, can survive this for so long.”
Dawas was in Brussels to describe his experience to European Union officials.
Gaza has been under Israeli bombardment and ground assault since October 7, when Hamas militants attacked southern Israel, killing more than 1,170 people, mostly civilians, according to an AFP tally based on Israeli figures.
Israel’s retaliatory offensive has killed at 36,050 people in Gaza, mostly civilians, according to the Hamas-run territory’s health ministry.


EU-Israel relations take a nosedive as Spain, Ireland set to formally recognize a Palestinian state

EU-Israel relations take a nosedive as Spain, Ireland set to formally recognize a Palestinian state
Updated 27 May 2024
Follow

EU-Israel relations take a nosedive as Spain, Ireland set to formally recognize a Palestinian state

EU-Israel relations take a nosedive as Spain, Ireland set to formally recognize a Palestinian state
  • EU’s foreign policy chief Josep Borrell threw his full weight to support the International Criminal Court

BRUSSELS: Relations between the European Union and Israel took a nosedive on the eve of the diplomatic recognition of a Palestinian state by EU members Ireland and Spain, with Madrid suggesting sanctions should be considered against Israel for its continued attacks in the southern Gaza city of Rafah.
Israeli Foreign Minister Katz told Spain that its consulate in Jerusalem will not be allowed to help Palestinians.
At the same time, the EU’s foreign policy chief Josep Borrell, a Spaniard, threw his full weight to support the International Criminal Court, whose prosecutor is seeking an arrest warrant against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and others, including the leaders of Hamas.
“The prosecutor of the court has been strongly intimidated and accused of antisemitism,” Borrell said. “The word antisemitic, it’s too heavy. It’s too important.”
Angry words abounded Monday, with Katz accusing Spain of “rewarding terror” by recognizing a Palestinian state, and saying that “the days of the Inquisition are over.” He referred to the infamous Spanish institution started in the 15th century to maintain Roman Catholic orthodoxy that forced Jews and Muslims to flee, convert to Catholicism or, in some instances, face death.
“No one will force us to convert our religion or threaten our existence — those who harm us, we will harm in return,” said Katz.
Even though the EU and its member nations have been steadfast in condemning the Oct. 7 Hamas-led attack in which militants stormed across the Gaza border into Israel, killing 1,200 people and taking some 250 hostage, the bloc has been equally critical of Israel’s ensuing offensive that has killed more than 35,000 Palestinians, according to Gaza’s Health Ministry.
The latest attacks have centered on Rafah, where Palestinian health workers said Israeli airstrikes killed at least 35 people Sunday, hit tents for displaced people and left “numerous” others trapped in flaming debris.
The UN’s top court, the International Court of Justice, on Friday demanded that Israel immediately halt its offensive on Rafah, even if it stopped short of ordering a ceasefire for the Gaza enclave.
“Israel has to stop its offensive in Rafah,” Spanish Foreign Minister José Manuel Albares said.
Spain, Ireland and non-EU member Norway plan to make official their recognition of a Palestinian state on Tuesday. Their joint announcement last week triggered an angry response from Israeli authorities, which summoned the countries’ ambassadors in Tel Aviv to the Israeli Foreign Ministry.
Albares criticized the treatment of the ambassadors. “We reject something that is not within diplomatic courtesy and the customs of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations,” he said.
“But at the same time we have also agreed that we are not going to fall into any provocation that distances us from our goal,” he added. “Our aim is to recognize the state of Palestine tomorrow, make all possible efforts to achieve a permanent ceasefire as soon as possible and also, in the end, to achieve that definitive peace.”


A bus crashes into vehicles in southern Turkiye, leaving 10 dead and 39 injured

A bus crashes into vehicles in southern Turkiye, leaving 10 dead and 39 injured
Updated 27 May 2024
Follow

A bus crashes into vehicles in southern Turkiye, leaving 10 dead and 39 injured

A bus crashes into vehicles in southern Turkiye, leaving 10 dead and 39 injured
  • The injured were rushed to nearby hospitals and at least eight of them were in serious condition
  • There were 28 passengers on board the intercity bus, which was traveling from the southeastern city of Diyarbakir to Adana

ANKARA: A passenger bus crashed into vehicles on a highway in southern Turkiye, killing at least 10 people and leaving 39 others injured, officials said Monday.
The accident occurred in the province of Mersin late on Sunday, when the bus veered into the opposite lane in heavy rain and crashed into two cars. A truck later slammed into all three vehicles, Gov. Ali Hamza Pehlivan told reporters.
The injured were rushed to nearby hospitals and at least eight of them were in serious condition, the state-run Anadolu Agency reported.
There were 28 passengers on board the intercity bus, which was traveling from the southeastern city of Diyarbakir to Adana, in the south of the country, Anadolu reported.


Iran’s acting president addresses new parliament

Iran’s acting president addresses new parliament
Updated 27 May 2024
Follow

Iran’s acting president addresses new parliament

Iran’s acting president addresses new parliament
  • Mohammad Mokhber’s first public speech since last week’s helicopter crash that killed his predecessor and seven others
  • Asserts the country’s economy remains stable when Iran took military actions in Iraq, Israel and Pakistan

TEHRAN: Iran’s acting President Mohammad Mokhber addressed the country’s new parliament Monday in his first public speech since last week’s helicopter crash that killed his predecessor and seven others.
His speech comes as Iran prepares for a presidential election to replace the late Ebrahim Raisi in just a month, a vote that could see the previously behind-the-scenes bureaucrat potentially run alongside others. Meanwhile, Iran’s new hard-line parliament is expected to select its new speaker Tuesday.
In his remarks, Mokhber praised Raisi’s time in office, noting that Iran’s crude oil production— a key source of hard currency for the country — climbed to more than 3.6 million barrels a day. That comes after Oil Minister Javad Owji said Sunday that Iran was now exporting around 2 million barrels a day, despite Western sanctions targeting the Islamic Republic.
Mokhber also asserted that the country’s economy remained stable under Raisi when Iran took military actions in Iraq, Israel and Pakistan in recent months.
“Three countries were hit. We hit Israel, people find that figures and indexes are the same in the morning when they wake up, price of hard currency is the same, inflation is the same, liquidity is the same and the market is full of people’s needs,” Mokhber claimed. “This strength, this settlement and this power is not a usual thing, they all were because of guidance by the supreme leader and the sincere efforts of Ayatollah Raisi.”
The Iranian rial has tumbled from a rate of 32,000 rials to $1 at the time of Tehran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. Today, it stands around 580,000 to $1 in the wake of the US’ unilateral withdrawal from the accord and a series of attacks on shipping in the Mideast, first attributed to Iran and later involving Yemen’s Houthi rebels as Israel’s war against Hamas on the Gaza Strip began over seven months ago.
On May 20, rescuers recovered the bodies of Raisi, Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian and others in a mountainous region in northwestern Iran following a fatal helicopter crash.
Iran will hold presidential elections on June 28 to replace Raisi. On Thursday, a five-day registration period for candidates will open. Analysts have suggested that Mokhber could be one of those to register.
Meanwhile, Monday marked the first day for Iran’s newly elected parliament, following a March election that saw the country’s lowest turnout since its 1979 Islamic Revolution. Of those elected to the 290-seat body, hard-liners hold over 230 seats, according to an Associated Press survey.
Iran’s parliament plays a secondary role in governing the country, though it can intensify pressure on a presidential administration when deciding on the annual budget and other important bills. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, 85, has the final say in all important state matters.