Royal decree to limit excessive bureaucratic paperwork in Saudi courts

King Salman on Wednesday issued a royal decree in coordination with the Ministry of Justice that requires all government bodies and authorities to limit bureaucracy. (SPA file photo)
Updated 18 January 2018

Royal decree to limit excessive bureaucratic paperwork in Saudi courts

RIYADH: King Salman bin Abdul Aziz on Wednesday issued a royal decree in coordination with the Ministry of Justice that requires all government bodies and authorities to limit the requirements for issuing case closers in the courts.
According to a statement released today by the Ministry of Justice, the royal decree directed that a mechanism be developed to replace submitting applications for case closers.
The mechanism is expected to be ready within no more than 90 days to limit the overflow of proceedings and disputes at the court.
A study conducted by a special committee for this matter revealed that the large number of requirements for case closers received by courts from government bodies for reasons that were adequate in the past are no longer valid in the presence of modern technology that links different agencies to each other.
The Ministry of Justice said the royal decree supported the goal of “limiting the flow of lawsuits in courts,” which is part of the National Transformation Program 2020 and the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.
Minister of Justice and Chairman of the Supreme Judicial Council Walid Al-Samaani, believes the royal decree will contribute to finding a solution to the overflow of case closer requests in courts, which isn’t part of their original duty of resolving disputes.
“In addition to that, some case closers and disclaimers can easily be finalized without involving the court, and in a manner that serves the purpose of the government bodies submitting these case closers,” he added.
The ministry pointed out that more than 20 kinds of case closer requests from almost 30 government bodies and others are sent to the courts without coordinating with the Ministry of Justice.
It highlighted that the royal decree concerns all government departments and bodies and aims to review decisions issued by courts for case closers; improve the performance of these bodies in terms of verifying facts and making the right decision; ensure case closers are not requested from a court without coordinating with the ministry to hold joint meetings with the government bodies; find solution for problems; and develop agreements in this regard.


Saudi Arabia details travel exemptions

These must provide proof of residency in the country to which they wish to travel. (SPA)
Updated 27 September 2020

Saudi Arabia details travel exemptions

  • In the cases of the death of a spouse, parent, or child abroad, the directorate requires the submission of a death certificate and proof of relationship

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s General Directorate of Passports on Saturday announced requirements for the issue of travel permits for groups exempt from coronavirus travel restrictions. Travel permits will be issued through the Absher e-services platform.
The first group exempt from travel restrictions includes government officials, civilians and members of the military assigned official missions.
This group can obtain travel permits if the official mission cannot be performed remotely and has a deadline that cannot be postponed, provided participation is kept to a minimum.
Documents required for the first group include an official letter from the entity’s senior official, in addition to the names of those who wish to travel and their mission, its location, duration and evidence that the previous conditions are met.
The second group includes citizens with humanitarian cases, especially family reunification, or the death of a spouse, parent or child abroad.

HIGHLIGHTS

• The first group exempt from travel restrictions includes government officials, civilians and members of the military assigned official missions.

• The second group includes citizens with humanitarian cases, especially family reunification, or the death of a spouse, parent or child abroad.

• The third group includes citizens living outside the Kingdom and their dependents.

Citizens who wish to be reunited with their families abroad must provide proof of relationship (spouse, parent, etc.) for the family member residing abroad, proof of residency in the country to which the other party wishes to travel, and proof of the children’s study location abroad if there are children of school age. The last should be certified by the Ministry of Education or one of the Kingdom’s representations in the destination country.
In the cases of the death of a spouse, parent, or child abroad, the directorate requires the submission of a death certificate and proof of relationship.
The third group includes citizens living outside the Kingdom and their dependents. These must provide proof of residency in the country to which they wish to travel (a document or an instrument that they own a property or have a valid lease contract prior to the issuance of these measures).
They must also submit a valid residence card (permanent or semi-permanent) in the country to which the travel is requested and proof that the applicant had spent at least six months in the destination country during the past three years.