Artist interweaves feminist ideals with textiles

'Jungle #1' by artist Hoda Tawakol, from her collection 'Palm Trees,' on display at Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde in Dubai. (Supplied)
Updated 01 January 2019

Artist interweaves feminist ideals with textiles

  • Artist Hoda Tawakol has her first exhibit in Dubai
  • An exhibit about the ever-evolving feminism discourse

DUBAI: French-Egyptian artist Hoda Tawakol’s first Dubai exhibit, which is running at Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde until Jan. 3, is a timely contribution to the ever-evolving feminism discourse.

Tawakol, whose work has been featured at the gallery since November, was inspired by her experiences growing up in France, Germany and Egypt.

Tawakol has made a name for herself through the use of hand-dyed and sewn textile pieces, sculptures, fabric collages and works on paper.

Her work, which mimics female cycles of life in an attempt to deconstruct stereotypes, is inspired by the feminist movement of the 1970s.

In fact, interwoven within her artwork are feminist ideals and blatant critiques of patriarchy.

Like many, Tawakol wishes to quell the expectations placed on women.

Her collection, entitled “Dolls,” is an expression of anger at women being objectified.

In “Lures,” she uses a falconry hood, a tool normally used to calm the birds of prey, to symbolize the way in which men oppress powerful women they wish to subdue.

Her artwork is masterfully done. It is symbolic and almost interactive in a way that simple paintings cannot be.

The pieces are so eye-catching, indeed, mesmerizing, not least through her use of captivating color schemes, that they almost beckon a response.

The exhibition is named after the main piece on display, a tapestry of black and red-colored fabric from her series “Palm Trees.”

The piece features hand-dyed textiles in Tawakol’s signature style. The series, which she began in 2015, is inspired by her multi-cultural childhood.

“Palm trees make me nostalgic,” the artist said. “They symbolize the Egypt of the 1940s and 1950s, the era of glamor, the golden age that I didn’t experience. At the same age, my playground in Europe had another kind of palm grove I found in the Palmengarten, a botanical garden in Frankfurt in Germany.”


Environmentally conscious Coldplay says it won’t tour new album, ahead of Jordan gigs

Updated 38 min 38 sec ago

Environmentally conscious Coldplay says it won’t tour new album, ahead of Jordan gigs

  • Chris Martin: We’re not touring this album. We’re taking time over the next year or two to work out how our tour (can not only) be sustainable but how can it be actively beneficial
  • Coldplay will perform two shows in Jordan on Friday to mark the album Everyday Life’s release

LONDON: British band Coldplay will not tour to promote their new album, but are working on how to make their gigs environmentally sustainable, lead singer Chris Martin said.
The rock group, known for songs like “Yellow,” “Paradise” and “Viva la Vida,” will release their eighth studio album “Everyday Life” on Friday. The 52-minute record is made up of two halves, “Sunrise” and “Sunset.”
“We’re not touring this album. We’re taking time over the next year or two to work out how our tour (can not only) be sustainable but how can it be actively beneficial,” Martin told British broadcaster BBC in Jordan, where Coldplay will perform two shows on Friday to mark the album’s release.
“Our dream is to have a show with no single-use plastic, to have it be largely solar-powered.”
Coldplay will play a one-off show at London’s Natural History Museum on Monday to promote the album. All performance proceeds will go to environmental charity ClientEarth.
“This is expected to be the band’s only UK show of the ‘Everyday Life’ era,” a press release for the show said.
Coldplay last toured globally in 2016-2017 to promote album “A Head Full of Dreams.”
“All of us, in every industry, have to just work out what the best way of doing our job is ... The hardest thing is the flying side of things,” Martin said.
Amid growing environmental concerns from consumers and young fans, several music artists have addressed climate change in lyrics or announced plans to improve their green credentials.
Rockers The 1975 teamed up with climate activist Greta Thunberg for a track on their upcoming album in which the teenage Swedish activist warns about climate change.
“It is fantastic to see world famous artists stepping up to protect the planet,” Gareth Redmond-King, head of Climate Change at the WWF conservation group, said in a statement.
“We all have a responsibility to lead by example in the face of this climate and nature crisis — inaction is not an option if we are to preserve our planet for future generations.”