Arab legacy lingers as Pakistan’s Gwadar grows from tiny fishing town into port city

Arab legacy lingers as Pakistan’s Gwadar grows from tiny fishing town into port city
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Many shopkeepers in Gwadar’s Shahi and other markets told Arab News on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 that they have displayed photos of the ruler of the Sultanate of Oman in their shops as a show of respect. (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)
Arab legacy lingers as Pakistan’s Gwadar grows from tiny fishing town into port city
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Several shops in Pakistan's coastal town of Gwadar are named Oman, which locals told Arab News on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 is a manifestation of the strong bond between the people of Gwadar and their old Arab rulers. (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)
Arab legacy lingers as Pakistan’s Gwadar grows from tiny fishing town into port city
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In this photograph taken on April 23, 2019, an Omani fort used for keeping inmates can be seen near Shahi Bazaar in Gwadar city (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)
Updated 29 April 2019

Arab legacy lingers as Pakistan’s Gwadar grows from tiny fishing town into port city

Arab legacy lingers as Pakistan’s Gwadar grows from tiny fishing town into port city
  • Pakistan bought Gwadar from Oman for Rs5.5 billion in 1958
  • Thousands of Gwadar locals have dual Pakistani and Omani nationality, continue to live and work between the two countries

GWADAR, Pakistan: One night, in the mid-1950s, a young fisherman, Muhammad Akbar, and his father pushed their boat into the sea near their village. Suddenly, they heard an explosion that sent sparkling fireworks into the air. They turned back, anchored their vessel, and ran toward their home.

It was Eid in the Omani city of Gwadar, and the blast was its official declaration.

 




Arab soldiers of Oman seen in a photo handout by Gwadar resident Nasir Raheem. 

“A few years later, when Gwadar became part of Pakistan, the ritual was no longer practiced. Yet, we continue do many things that are specific to the legacy of Arab rule in Gwadar,” recalled Akbar, now 78, while sipping his tea at the historic Kareemuk Hotel in Shahi Bazaar – or the royal market.

The hotel itself is the remnant of the bygone era when Oman ruled the territory. “It used to be a bakery owned by an Arab, Omar Mascuti, who gifted it to a local, Abdul Salam, who turned it into a tea shop.”

The culturally diverse city of Gwadar also has the ancestral neighborhood of Sadruddin Hashwani – chairman of the Hashoo Group, a conglomerate of hotels and resorts – where a large number of Ismaili Khojas live.

“This fishing village of a few thousand people, which grew into a city of nearly ninety thousand people, has a Hindu temple and an Ismaili jamaat khana,” Noor Mohsin, a resident of Gwadar, said, adding: “It’s a testament to the fact that Gwadar during and after the Arab rule was a diverse town. It still is today.”

Gwadar is situated on a natural hammerhead-shaped headland that forms two seamless, but naturally curved, semi-circular bays on both side – the east bay called Demi Zirr, and the west bay called Paddi Zirr. The city is situated on a tapered and sandy 12-kilometer-long strip that links the Pakistani coast to rocky outcroppings in the Arabian Sea known as the Gwadar Peninsula, or Koh-e-Batil.

In 1783, Taimur Sultan, the grandfather of Oman’s incumbent ruler, Qaboos bin Said al Said, ran away to Kalat Khanate after getting defeated where the ruler, Mir Noori Naseer Khan Baloch, granted him suzerainty over Gwadar. Sultan continued to rule over the territory even after reclaiming Muscat and appointed an administrator to Gwadar.

Three forts were built here during the Omani rule, while telegraph lines were also extended into the town at a later stage. On 8 September 1958, Pakistan purchased Gwadar from Oman for Rs5.5 billion (or US$ 3.89 billion in 2019).




This photo taken on Tuesday April 23, 2019 shows one of three Omani forts in Gwadar, which was part of the Sultanate of Oman until September 1958. (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)

With Pakistan’s ownership, the Arab era came to an end here. However, Gwadar’s journey, from a small fishing village to a port city, has not taken away the golden memories of that period from its residents.

“The cannons you see outside the old municipal office are not fired to announce the advent of Eid. Still we break our fast much like Arabs,” Akbar said.




This cannon displayed outside the old municipal office of Gwadar is one the two cannons which would fire explosives to announce the beginning of the religious festival of Eid before Pakistan purchased Gwadar from Oman in 1958, locals told Arab News on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)

Unlike the rest of Balochistan, the people of Gwadar consume a substantial quantity of dates and lassi [a yogurt-based drink] during Ramadan and have their dinner after tarawih prayers. Sukoun, an Arabian dish, is also made and shared by residents of different neighborhoods among themselves. “Dates are softened in water and wheat flour is mixed with them. Women here in olden days started making it at noon and send it to neighbors hours before iftar,” told Nasir Raheem, a social activist, whose father Raheem Bux Sohrabi was one of nearly half a dozen influential personalities who campaigned for Gwadar’s accession with Pakistan.

Sakeena Bibi, 80, said that women had soaked up quite a few traditions from Arabs and still practiced them. “The women in Gwadar like to use oud scent,” she said. “Oud is put on flaming coals and the smoke is then spread in the wardrobes that result in excellent and long lasting fragrance.”

“When someone in Oman or other Gulf countries inquire about our gift choices, we ask them to send us oud,” she told Arab News.

Sakeena is aged but still remembers her Arab friends, Shadi and Kana’an. “The women in Gwadar and Makran chant the same way as Arab women while we are happy. This is what we have adopted from them.”




On April 23, 2019, Sakeena Bibi, 80, recalled "the golden days" of Gwadar before Pakistan purchased the town from the rulers of Oman in 1958 (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)

But it’s not just the food or fragrance: The people of Gwadar have also copied Arab dances. “Leva is an African and Arab dance. A man in center beats a drum and people dance around it,” Raheem said.

“The strong bond,” he continued, “is not confined to few customs. Many people in Gwadar are dual nationals and say that they belong to both Pakistan and Oman. A large number of people from Makran serves in Oman’s army. A good number is part of the Bahraini police. A large number works in Oman, Qatar, UAE and Bahrain and send remittances to families in Pakistan. Those are permanently settled there provide financial support to their relatives here.”

“My brother works in Oman. My sister is an Omani national. It’s the story of every second household and it connects us to the Arab world,” he told Arab News.

Akbar says there are several similar wedding rituals among Arabs and Baloch. “There had been intermarriages as well. Some people here still wear kandura on special occasions like weddings, Eid and Jumma prayers,” Akbar said.

Dad Karim, a fisherman who like many old residents have still kept his parents’ old passport of 1900, said there were people who could tolerate criticism of Pakistan rulers, “but there are others who get annoyed when someone says something against the rulers of Oman.”




Dad Kareem, a fisherman who has kept the old Omani passport of his father, told Arab News on Tuesday, April 23, 2019 that the people of Gwadar have a special love for Arabs (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)

The date palms of the coastal Makran district were also contributed by Arabs, including some preachers from Saudi Arabia, who brought date seeds with them that benefitted us for centuries, Karim said.

The Shahi Bazaar and three forts also reminds people of Gwadar about the Omani rule. One of them has been turned into a museum after the ministry of heritage and culture of the Sultanate of Oman restored it on the directives of Sultan Qaboos bin Said during his state visit to Pakistan in 2001. It was officially inaugurated by General (r) Pervez Musharraf on March 20, 2007.




This photo taken on Tuesday April 23, 2019 shows a Omani fort in Thana Ward in Gwadar, which has now been converted into museum.  (AN Photo by Hassam Lashkari)

“Arabs are great people. When someone from a foreign country rules another population, the locals begin to despise them. Ours is a special case. There is love and only love,” Karim said.


‘Long Covid’ symptoms ease after vaccine: Survey

‘Long Covid’ symptoms ease after vaccine: Survey
Updated 20 min 42 sec ago

‘Long Covid’ symptoms ease after vaccine: Survey

‘Long Covid’ symptoms ease after vaccine: Survey
  • Study suggests mRNA vaccines such as Pfizer, Moderna particularly beneficial
  • Analysis author: ‘Data very encouraging but we don’t know how long benefits last’

LONDON: COVID-19 vaccines tend to alleviate the symptoms of the medical phenomenon known as “long Covid,” according to a survey involving 800 people.

The study suggests that mRNA vaccines are particularly beneficial in battling long Covid symptoms.

The virus was initially understood to be a largely respiratory illness that most people would recover from within a month, but people started to report symptoms that continued for many months. 

Medical experts are still hunting for a consensus definition for the phenomenon, with people suffering from chronic fatigue to organ damage.

There are also mysteries surrounding appropriate and effective treatment plans that can be standardized across the population.

But anecdotal reports have so far suggested that vaccines can help some people who are still struggling with COVID-19 symptoms long after their original infection.

The analysis has yet to be peer reviewed, but the results of the survey by advocacy group LongCovidSOS could offer medical practitioners a pathway to restoring normalcy to many.

The survey consisted of 812 mostly white, female participants with long Covid in Britain and internationally, who were contacted via social media. 

The participants were asked to wait at least a week after their first dose of the jab to prevent their responses being affected by vaccine side effects.

Changes across 14 common long Covid symptoms were compared before and after the first inoculation. 

LongCovidSOS data found that 56.7 percent of respondents experienced an overall improvement in symptoms, with 24.6 percent reporting no changes and 18.7 percent finding that their symptoms worsened after the jab.

In general, participants who received mRNA vaccines (such as the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna jabs) reported more improvements in symptoms than those who got an adenovirus vaccine (Oxford-AstraZeneca). 

The Moderna vaccine was found to have the most promising results, with participants seeing the greatest improvements in symptoms such as fatigue, brain fog and muscle pain.

The analysis found that Moderna recipients were also less likely to endure a deterioration in their ailments.

“This survey will reassure people that they would have to be quite unlucky to really have an overall worsening of symptoms,” said LongCovidSOS analysis author Ondine Sherwood. “The data is very encouraging, but we don’t know how long the benefits last.”

Dr. David Strain, an analysis author and senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter medical school, said: “There isn’t a blood pressure tablet that fixes everybody … and similarly, there’s not one long Covid treatment that’s going to fix everyone — but the fact that one treatment does fix something means that there’s bound to be other treatments out there that will fix others.”

As the assessment was via survey, there can be no definitive proof to show that the vaccine caused the improvement in symptoms.

After suffering from long Covid symptoms for so long, the improvement could have come from natural regeneration. 

However, Strain said of the 130 people in the survey who received both vaccine doses, some improved after their first jab — before finding their situation worsening again — and then improved further after their second inoculation.

But Nisreen Alwan, an associate professor in public health at the University of Southampton, warned that as the improvement in symptoms had abated in about half the participants by the time they completed the survey, the analysis could show that the vaccine-inspired improvement was fleeting.

Mystery remains about the cause of long Covid, with some experts theorizing that it could involve the persistence of the virus remaining within the body — such as fragments of the virus lingering after infection — and the immune system overreacting to the remaining virus and damaging healthy tissues.

Strain said the LongCovidSOS analysis suggested that COVID-19 vaccines help to reset the immune system, telling it to target the virus and spare itself.

But he cautioned that this explanation is speculation and will need further investigation to be supported.

Prof. Danny Altmann, professor of immunology at Imperial College London, said: “How could a vaccine make a subset of long-term sufferers feel better? It’s tempting to hypothesise that this was the subset who had symptoms due to a reservoir of virus that was never properly cleared, and the enormous boost of a potent vaccine equipped them with the immune response to do this. This needs mechanistic investigation of the actual immune responses.”


Over 96% of people build antibodies after single COVID-19 jab: Study

Over 96% of people build antibodies after single COVID-19 jab: Study
Updated 46 min 1 sec ago

Over 96% of people build antibodies after single COVID-19 jab: Study

Over 96% of people build antibodies after single COVID-19 jab: Study
  • Lead author: ‘It’s a real feat of science in the face of the most devastating pandemic in a century’
  • ‘How well these vaccines work is remarkable, especially given the speed at which they’ve been developed’

LONDON: More than 96 percent of people develop coronavirus antibodies after receiving only a single dose of the AstraZeneca or Pfizer vaccine, new research has revealed. 

The England- and Wales-based study, which monitored more than 8,000 participants, also discovered that almost 100 percent of people develop immune cells to successfully fight off coronavirus after two vaccine doses.

Researchers found that 96.42 percent of people who received the AstraZeneca or Pfizer vaccine developed antibodies 28-34 days after a first dose. 

The figure grew to 99.08 percent within seven to 14 days of receiving a second jab, The Guardian newspaper reported.

“This is one of the earliest real-world vaccine studies in the UK and it is fantastic news,” said Dr. Maddie Shrotri, lead author of the research paper.

“More than nine out of 10 adults in the UK who had either the Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccine produced antibodies against the virus within a month of their first shot,” she added.

“How well these vaccines work is remarkable, especially given the speed at which they’ve been developed. It’s a real feat of science in the face of the most devastating pandemic in a century.”

The study, conducted by University College London (UCL) scientists, could have positive implications on the worldwide fight against the coronavirus pandemic. It will be placed through a peer review process before submission to a medical journal.

UCL scientists found that both vaccines were equally capable of triggering the antibody response that can ward off severe coronavirus infections.

However, antibody levels after a single jab were discovered to be lower in older people and those with underlying health conditions, including cancer, diabetes and heart disease. That discrepancy was later resolved after participants received a second vaccine dose.

The study is a “timely reminder” about the importance of receiving a second dose, said Prof. Rob Aldridge, chief investigator of the UCL study. “But it is also reassuring — vaccines are our way out of the pandemic.”


Spanish troops deploy in Ceuta after thousands of migrants break in from Morocco

Migrants, including minors, who arrived swimming at the Spanish enclave of Ceuta, rest as Spanish soldiers stand guard on May 18, 2021 in Ceuta. (AFP)
Migrants, including minors, who arrived swimming at the Spanish enclave of Ceuta, rest as Spanish soldiers stand guard on May 18, 2021 in Ceuta. (AFP)
Updated 18 May 2021

Spanish troops deploy in Ceuta after thousands of migrants break in from Morocco

Migrants, including minors, who arrived swimming at the Spanish enclave of Ceuta, rest as Spanish soldiers stand guard on May 18, 2021 in Ceuta. (AFP)
  • Videos shared online showed migrants entering Ceuta earlier, by swimming and by climbing over the fence, unimpeded by Moroccan authorities

CUETA: Spain has deployed troops to Ceuta to patrol the border with Morocco after thousands of migrants swam into the northern African enclave, in what Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez called a serious crisis for Spain and Europe.

Soldiers in armored vehicles were guarding Ceuta's beach on Tuesday. Dozens of migrants swimming and wading close to the beach appeared to be moving away from where troops stood. Hundreds of other potential migrants stood on the Moroccan side of the fence that separates the Spanish enclave from Morocco.

Videos shared online showed migrants entering Ceuta earlier, by swimming and by climbing over the fence, unimpeded by Moroccan authorities.

According to some experts, Morocco uses the tactic of alowing migrants into Ceuta as an instrument of pressure on Madrid, which angered Rabat last month by admitting the leader of Western Sahara's rebel Polisario Front to a Spanish hospital.

“This is happening because of the absolute passivity of the Moroccan authorities,” Ceuta regional leader Juan Jose Vivas told 24H TV channel, adding that the situation was chaotic and it was now impossible to say how many migrants had entered.

“This transcends migration, we are talking about (Spain's) territorial integrity, sovereignty and borders.”

Spanish Interior Minister Fernando Grande-Marlaska said as many as 6,000 migrants, including about 1,500 minors, swam into Ceuta on Monday and Tuesday. He said about 2,700 had already been sent back to Morocco.

His ministry said Morocco was accepting all the migrants being sent back under a readmission deal.

In Ceuta, adult arrivals were being transferred to a local stadium before deportation, while minors were being sent to an industrial building.

European Commission Vice-President Margaritis Schinas tweeted that the enclave's frontier was a European border, expressing his “full solidarity with Spain” and calling for a European pact on migration and “strong protection of our borders.”

Morocco has a claim on Ceuta and another Spanish enclave, Melilla.

Ceuta, with a population of 80,000, is located on the northern tip of Morocco across from Gibraltar. Along with Melilla, it has long been a magnet for African migrants trying to reach Europe in search of a better life.
The Melilla government delegation spokesman said 86 migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa broke into the enclave, located about 300km east of Ceuta, early on Tuesday, but a larger group had been blocked by Moroccan police.


Sweden’s third COVID wave ebbing fast as vaccines bite

Sweden’s third COVID wave ebbing fast as vaccines bite
Updated 18 May 2021

Sweden’s third COVID wave ebbing fast as vaccines bite

Sweden’s third COVID wave ebbing fast as vaccines bite
  • More than 40% of the adult population has received at least one dose of vaccine
  • The Nordic country registered 10,017 new coronavirus cases since Friday, health agency statistics showed on Tuesday

STOCKHOLM: Sweden, which has shunned lockdowns throughout the pandemic, has seen the number of cases and intensive care patients drop fast in the recent weeks.
So far more than 40 percent of the adult population has received at least one dose of vaccine.
The Nordic country registered 10,017 new coronavirus cases since Friday, health agency statistics showed on Tuesday, a decline compared to the 13,812 cases reported during the corresponding period last week.
Sweden has experienced a powerful third wave of the virus with the number of people testing positive per capita among the highest in Europe for months, in stark contrast to its Nordic neighbors where infections have remained relatively subdued throughout the pandemic.
However, with over 40 percent percent of the adult population having received at least one shot of vaccine and around 12 percent fully vaccinated, the number of people in intensive care has still fallen more than 30 percent from a peak three weeks ago.
The vaccine roll-out is also credited for deaths being relatively low this year compared to previous waves of the disease with data suggesting no excess mortality so far in 2021.
The country of 10 million inhabitants registered 26 new deaths, taking the total to 14,301. The deaths registered have occurred over several days and sometimes weeks.
Sweden’s death rate per capita is many times higher than that of its Nordic neighbors’ but lower than in most European countries that opted for lockdowns.


UK police arrest man after car driven into pro-Palestine protest

UK police arrest man after car driven into pro-Palestine protest
Updated 18 May 2021

UK police arrest man after car driven into pro-Palestine protest

UK police arrest man after car driven into pro-Palestine protest
  • The 51-year-old was arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm and dangerous driving
  • Social media clips appear to show a car being driven through crowds of protesters in Nottingham

LONDON: British police have arrested a man after a car was driven into pro-Palestinian demonstrations in the English city of Nottingham.

The 51-year-old was arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm and dangerous driving, officers said. He remains in police custody.

The incident took place on Saturday in the center of the city. Social media clips appear to show a car being driven through crowds of protesters on the streets. One man is thought to have suffered serious leg injuries as a result.