What We Are Reading Today: Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell

Updated 14 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell

In Talking to Strangers, Malcolm Gladwell investigates what goes wrong when we interact with people we don’t know, using dramatic scenarios ripped from the headlines, history, psychology, and criminology.

“No one shows us who we are like Gladwell. Here he sets out to understand why we act the way we do, and how we all might know a little more about those we don’t,” said a review in goodreads.com.

Gladwell is the author of five New York Times bestsellers: The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath.

The new book likely to be his most controversial yet, both in terms of his chosen subject matter and the examples he uses to illustrate his points. 

“Summarizing the lessons to be learned from the diverse tales in his book, Gladwell’s main conclusions are that it would be disastrous if we stopped trusting people, that we should ‘accept the limits of our ability to decipher strangers,’ and that it behooves us to be thoughtful, humble and mindful of context when trying to understand people’s actions,” Anthony Gottlieb said in a review for The New York Times.


What We Are Reading Today: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

Updated 15 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. 

Kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities — and also the faults and biases — of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

The impact of loss aversion and overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the challenges of properly framing risks at work and at home — each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems work together to shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, the author reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. 

He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives — and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble.