Huda and Mona Kattan share heartfelt message on Iraq

The makeup moguls are originally from Iraq. (AFP)
Updated 07 October 2019

Huda and Mona Kattan share heartfelt message on Iraq

DUBAI: Beauty entrepreneurs Huda and Mona Kattan have both taken to Instagram to share heartfelt messages with the people of Iraq in light of the violence that is rocking the country.

More than 100 people, including security personnel, have been killed and more than 6,000 wounded in recent days as Iraqi forces used live ammunition and tear gas to repel demonstrators who clashed with security forces as they tried to reach government and party headquarters in Baghdad and the provinces.

Both sisters, the entrepreneurs behind internationally successful beauty brand Huda Beauty, took to social media to share their thoughts on the situation in Iraq.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Happy Thursday my loves!

A post shared by Mona Kattan (@monakattan) on

“A lot (of) you may not know this but both of my parents are originally from Iraq. I personally have never lived there but it’s still so close to my heart and my family always tells me about how incredible the country is and I have so much love and admiration for Iraqis,” both sisters posted separately on Instagram.

“It breaks my heart to see the Iraqi people suffering and going through more hardship once again, Dear people of Iraq, we are praying for your safety, we are praying for your peace, we are praying for your happiness, we are praying for your future, we are praying for your success, we are praying for the best for you all,” the siblings added.

The makeup moguls, who were born and raised in the US, shared the message alongside a picture featuring a sketched outline of Iraq with a drawn dove at its center.

Kattan, who ranked 36th on Forbes’ 2019 list of the US’s wealthiest self-made female entrepreneurs, has spoken about her Arab heritage in the past.  

“Because I had grown up in the US, I had a very middle-eastern style, but also a very western influence as well - I always knew I wanted to be global,” she told the BBC in April.

“I grew up in the States in a very small town in the south, in Tennessee, and I didn't know why but I wore so much eyeliner - no one around me did, including my mother.

“I started to wonder when I left and moved to the Middle East whether, in fact, it was innate.”

The entrepreneur is now based in Dubai, where she runs the Huda Beauty brand and films episodes of her Facebook Watch reality show, “Huda Boss.”


‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging. (Supplied)
Updated 23 October 2019

‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

MUMBAI: Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven,” which was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival, is pure cinema. Like his earlier works, here too the Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, this time to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging.

He says people worldwide now live in fear amid global geopolitical tensions. Today, checkpoints are just about everywhere: In airports, shopping malls, cinemas, highways — the list is endless.

“It Must Be Heaven” was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival. (Supplied) 

Suleiman’s earlier features, such as “Chronicle of a Disappearance” and “Divine Intervention,” showed us everyday life in the occupied Palestinian territories. This time, it is Paris and New York. 

The first scene is hilarious, with a bishop trying to enter a church with his followers. The gatekeeper on the other side of the heavy wooden door is probably too intoxicated and refuses to let the priest in, leading to a comical situation. Suleiman’s life in Nazareth is filled with such incidents — snippets that have been strung together to tell us of tension in society. Neighbors turn out to be selfish, and only generous when they know they are being watched. 

The Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. (Supplied)

In Paris, the cafes along the grand boulevards, and the young women who pass by, are typical of France’s capital. But a cut to Bastille Day, with tanks rolling by in a show of strength, jolts us back to harsh reality. In New York, Suleiman’s cab driver is excited at driving a Palestinian. 

The film has an interesting way of storytelling. The scenes begin as observational shots, but the camera quickly changes positions to show Suleiman watching from the other side of the room or a street. The camera then returns to where it first stood, and this back-and-forth movement is delightfully engaging.

The framing is so perfect, and the colors so bright and beautiful, that each scene looks magical. And as the director looks on at all this with his usual deadpan expression, a sardonic twitch at the corner of his mouth, we know all this is but illusion. There is bitter truth ahead!