The race to eat Bangkok’s ‘biggest burger,’ a 10,000-calorie challenge

A woman shows what the Chris Steaks & Burgers restaurant says is Thailand's biggest burger weighing more than 6 kilograms, before a competition held to eat it at the restaurant in Bangkok, Thailand, on October 11, 2019. (REUTERS/Jiraporn Kuhakan)
Updated 31 October 2019

The race to eat Bangkok’s ‘biggest burger,’ a 10,000-calorie challenge

BANGKOK: A Bangkok burger joint has become an Internet sensation after YouTubers started challenging each other to eat its biggest meal — a near 6kg (13 pound) patty covered in fried onion rings, bacon and mayonnaise.
Chris Steaks and Burgers is offering a 10,000 baht ($330) prize for anyone who can finish the mammoth snack in nine minutes — one baht for every calorie.
Owner Komdech Kongsuwan, who says it is the country’s biggest burger, dreamed up the contest after three customers managed the feat. New challengers are coming through the door every day.
Among them was Pakorn Porncheewangkoon, who failed to finish the burderin time. “I will eat a burger at some point (in the future), but not any time soon,” he said.
The beef version of the “6kg Burger” costs 2,500 baht ($82.75) and the pork one 3,500 baht ($115.86). (Additional reporting by Vorasit Satienlerk; Editing by Andrew Heavens)


Singapore baggage handler jailed for swapping luggage tags

Updated 12 November 2019

Singapore baggage handler jailed for swapping luggage tags

  • Bags belonged to passengers transiting through Changi and using Singapore Airlines and its regional wing SilkAir
  • Changi handled nearly 65.6 million passengers last year

SINGAPORE: A Singaporean baggage handler has been jailed for 20 days for swapping tags on nearly 300 suitcases at the city-state’s airport, causing them to end up at wrong destinations around the world.
Tay Boon Keh, 66, had pleaded guilty to charges of swapping the tags on 286 bags at Changi Airport, one of the world’s busiest hubs.
He made the swaps between November 2016 and February 2017 out of “frustration and anger” after his request for additional staff at his work section was ignored, a district court heard.
Suitcases originally bound for various parts of the world, including Perth, Manila, Frankfurt, London and San Francisco, were affected, according to court documents.
The bags belonged to passengers transiting through Changi and using Singapore Airlines and its regional wing SilkAir.
Tay was suffering from major depressive disorder when he committed the offenses, the court heard.
But state prosecutors said evidence presented at a hearing showed his condition “did not contribute significantly to his commission of the offenses” as he continued to have control over his actions.
Prosecutor Thiam Jia Min said the swapping could have caused “potentially, even serious or fatal, consequences” as some passengers could have been left without medications.
Changi handled nearly 65.6 million passengers last year.