Virgin Galactic completes first glide flight

The Virgin Galactic spaceship flying in the New Mexico airspace on Friday. The VSS Unity landed in the desert after its first glide flight from Spaceport America. (AP)
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Updated 03 May 2020

Virgin Galactic completes first glide flight

  • Virgin Galactic went public on the New York Stock Exchange last fall. Company officials are preparing to release their first quarter results Tuesday

ALBUQUERQUE: Virgin Galactic’s spaceship VSS Unity has landed in the New Mexico desert, marking its first glide flight from Spaceport America as the company moves toward commercial operations.

After years of development and testing at Mojave Air & Space Port in Mojave, California, Virgin Galactic is close to starting actual operations at its futuristic terminal and hangar in southern New Mexico.
The company has not set a date for the first commercial flights but has said that it anticipates doing so in 2020.
A small number of test flights are needed before Virgin Galactic can take paying customers on supersonic thrill rides to the lower reaches of space to experience a few minutes of weightlessness and a view of the Earth below.
The suborbital flights will reach an altitude of at least 50 miles (80.5 kilometers) before the spaceship glides to a landing.
The company considered Friday’s flight a major achievement that has been in the works since the spaceship and carrier plane relocated to New Mexico in February.
The flight provided the first opportunity to test all the components required to fly the carrier aircraft and spaceship in glide configuration from their new home base. Officials will now be reviewing data gathered during the exercise so they can prepare for the next test flight.

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The first Virgin Galactic seats cost $250,000 apiece.

The spaceship reached a glide speed of Mach 0.70 as the pilots performed a series of maneuvers to check handling and aerodynamics and to get more familiar with the New Mexico airspace.
Virgin Galactic CEO George Whitesides congratulated his team on hitting the milestone, especially during such challenging times.
“I am grateful for the commitment displayed by everyone involved, not only in helping to support relief efforts in both New Mexico and California, but also for the dedication and creativity which will allow us to continue safely toward our goal of commercial launch,” he said.
While many employees have been working remotely during the pandemic, members of the Virgin Galactic team have been helping with relief efforts. They have donated meals, masks, gloves and other medical supplies to communities and hospitals in New Mexico and California.
The company also has made
donations of more than $60,000 in New Mexico and is working on developing oxygen hoods that could potentially help COVID-19 patients.
Virgin Galactic went public on the New York Stock Exchange last fall. Company officials are preparing to release their first quarter results Tuesday.
More than 600 customers from around the world have put down deposits for flights, and about 8,000 reservations of interest have been made since the successful test flight into space in December 2018.
Company officials expect that interest to surpass the company’s capacity for flights for the next few years.


Libya’s NOC says production to rise as it seeks to revive oil industry

Updated 22 September 2020

Libya’s NOC says production to rise as it seeks to revive oil industry

  • Libya produced around 1.2 million bpd – over 1 percent of global production – before the blockade
  • Libya’s return to the oil market is sustainable

LONDON: Libya’s National Oil Company said it expected oil production to rise to 260,000 barrels per day (bpd) next week, as the OPEC member looks to revive its oil industry, crippled by a blockade since January.
Oil prices fell around 5 percent on Monday, partly due to the potential return of Libyan barrels to a market that’s already grappling with the prospect of collapsing demand from rising coronavirus cases.
Libya produced around 1.2 million bpd — over 1 percent of global production — before the blockade, which slashed the OPEC member’s output to around 100,000 bpd.
NOC, in a statement late on Monday, said it is preparing to resume exports from “secure ports” with oil tankers expected to begin arriving from Wednesday to load crude in storage over the next 72 hours.
As an initial step, exports are set to resume from the Marsa El Hariga and Brega oil terminals, it said.
The Marlin Shikoku tanker is making its way to Hariga where it is expected to load a cargo for trader Unipec, according to shipping data and traders.
Eastern Libyan commander Khalifa Haftar said last week his forces would lift their eight-month blockade of oil exports.
NOC insists it will only resume oil operations at facilities devoid of military presence.
Nearly a decade after rebel fighters backed by NATO air strikes overthrew dictator Muammar Qaddafi, Libya remains in chaos, with no central government.
The unrest has battered its oil industry, slashing production capacity down from 1.6 million bpd.
Goldman Sachs said Libya’s return should not derail the oil market’s recovery, with an upside risk to production likely to be offset by higher compliance with production cuts from other OPEC members.
“We see both logistical and political risks to a fast and sustainable increase in production,” the bank said. It expects a 400,000 bpd increase in Libyan production by December.
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and allies led by Russia, are closely watching the Libya situation, waiting to see if this time Libya’s return to the oil market is sustainable, sources told Reuters.