French-Algerian singer Lolo Zouaï teams up with Adidas

Adidas has selected French-Algerian singer Lolo Zouaï to star in the sportswear giant’s latest “Change is a Team Sport” campaign. Supplied
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Updated 28 June 2020

French-Algerian singer Lolo Zouaï teams up with Adidas

DUBAI: Adidas has selected French-Algerian singer Lolo Zouaï to star in the sportswear giant’s latest “Change is a Team Sport” campaign for its signature Superstar sneakers. 

The “Desert Rose” hitmaker appears alongside other notable figures hailing from France, including Manchester United footballer Paul Pogba and rappers Vald and Dinos.

Adidas’ new campaign serves as the French counterpart to the American advertising campaign, which was unveiled in February and featured US actress Yara Shahidi, the first female K-Pop group to perform at Coachella, Black Pink, as well as actor Jonah Hill, singer-producer Pharrell Williams and Brazilian singer Anitta, among many others.

Similarly, the new ad was photographed to evoke a class picture and can be found displayed at Adidas flagship stores in France.

Previously, the singer was cast alongside Liu Wen and Michael B. Jordan in the Fall 2019 Coach global campaign shot by renowned photographer Juergen Teller and became the face of American label Tommy Hilfiger.




Lolo Zouaï for Adidas Originals. Supplied

The Franco-Algerian singer was born Laureen Zouaï (pronounced “zoo-eye”) to a French mother and an Algerian father. She relocated to San Francisco with her family when she was three-months-old.

Her debut EP “High Highs to Low Lows” would  go on to garner over 60 million streams worldwide, catapulting her into the mainstream spotlight. Shortly after, she gained the attention of British hitmaker Dua Lipa, who chose the part-Algerian singer to open up for her forthcoming arena tour in 2021, as well as singers Demi Lovato, Billie Eilish and Grimes who are all fans of the artist’s music.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Me and my booty for @tommyjeans #tommyjeans ad

A post shared by Lolo Zouaï (@lolozouai) on

When she’s not fronting campaigns, performing at fashion shows or releasing new music, the artist can be found using her platform to champion a good cause. 

Amidst the anti-racism protests  sweeping the world right now, the singer has pledged to donate her merch sales for June 2020 to Black Lives Matter, and will be donating annually each June to a Black Lives Matter cause for the rest of her career, she revealed.

Prior to the release of her latest single “Beautiful Lies,” the 25-year-old announced that she would be donating $5 from every pre-save to The Loveland Foundation, an initiative that seeks to offer free therapy sessions for Black women.


In Lebanon, single-concert festival serenades empty ruins

Updated 05 July 2020

In Lebanon, single-concert festival serenades empty ruins

  • The Baalbek International Festival was streamed live on television and social media
  • The night kicked off with the Lebanese philharmonic orchestra and choir performing the national anthem

BEIRUT: A philharmonic orchestra performed to spectator-free Roman ruins in east Lebanon Sunday, after a top summer festival downsized to a single concert in a year of economic meltdown and pandemic.
The Baalbek International Festival was instead streamed live on television and social media, in what its director called a message of “hope and resilience” amid ever-worsening daily woes.
The night kicked off with the Lebanese philharmonic orchestra and choir performing the national anthem, followed by Carmina Burana’s “O Fortuna,” a 13th century poem set to music.

The program, which ran for just over an hour, included a mix of classical music and rock and folk tunes by composers ranging from Beethoven to Lebanon’s Rahbani brothers.
Held in the open air and conducted by Harout Fazlian, the 150 musicians and chorists were scattered inside the illuminated Temple of Bacchus, as drones filmed them among the enormous ruins and Greco-Roman temples of Baalbek.
Festival director Nayla de Freige told AFP most artists performed for free at the designated UNESCO World Heritage site.
The concert aimed to represent “a way of saying that Lebanon does not want to die. We have an extremely productive and creative art and culture sector,” she said.
“We want to send a message of civilization, hope and resilience.”
Baalbek itself became a militia stronghold during Lebanon’s 1975-1990 civil war, but conservation and tourism have revived the ruins over the past three decades.
Lebanon is known for its summer music festivals, which have in past years drawn large crowds every night and attracted performers like Shakira, Sting and Andrea Bocelli.
Other festivals have not yet announced their plans for this year.
Lebanon has recorded just 1,873 cases of COVID-19, including 36 deaths.
But measures to stem the spread of the virus have exacerbated the country’s worst economic crisis since the 1975-1990 civil war.
Since economic woes in the autumn sparked mass protests against a political class deemed irretrievably corrupt, tens of thousands have lost their jobs or part of their income, and prices have skyrocketed.
Banks have prevented depositors from withdrawing their dollar savings, while the local currency has lost more than 80 percent of its value to the greenback on the black market.