Brawl over mask leaves security guard at US store with broken arm

A teacher joins in with healthcare workers during a protest for Personal Protective gear at a hospital in Westminster, California, on July 22, 2020 amid the raging coronavirus pandemic. Citizens are also enjoined to wear masks whenever they venture outside their homes to help fight the coronavirus. (REUTERS/Mike Blake)
Short Url
Updated 25 July 2020

Brawl over mask leaves security guard at US store with broken arm

LOS ANGELES: Two brothers in California are facing criminal charges after getting into a brawl with security guards at a store for not wearing masks and leaving one of the guards with a broken arm.
Phillip and Paul Hamilton, 31 and 29 respectively, were confronted by the guards at a Target store in Van Nuys — located about 18 miles (30 kilometers) northwest of downtown Los Angeles — after they were spotted without face coverings, as required to prevent the spread of coronavirus.
As they were being escorted out, the pair punched one of the four security guards and a brawl ensued, leaving one of the guards with a broken arm, according to the complaint.
“Not wearing a mask is selfish, wrong and illegal,” Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer said in a statement on Friday. “We will absolutely not tolerate violence in response to appropriate efforts to assure business patrons wear face coverings.
“We have one common enemy — and it’s the virus, not each other.”
The scuffle, which took place in May and was caught on video, is the latest in a string of similar incidents in the United States over the wearing of masks which has become a political issue.
The two brothers, who have been charged with multiple counts of battery and trespass, face more than a year in jail if convicted.


TWITTER POLL: Almost 3 of 4 readers think there is more to the massive blast in Beirut

Updated 07 August 2020

TWITTER POLL: Almost 3 of 4 readers think there is more to the massive blast in Beirut

  • Impact of the blast was also reportedly felt 200 kilometers away in Cyprus
  • Mushroom clouds and spherical blast waves are conflated as nuclear in nature

DUBAI: Almost three of four readers think there is more to the massive explosions that hit a Beirut port on Tuesday, according to an Arab News straw poll on Twitter.

The blast, caused by a stockpile ammonium nitrate stored in a warehouse, generated a shock wave so devastating that it levelled buildings near the port and caused extensive damage over much of the rest of the capital, killing more than 100 people and injuring thousands.

The impact of the blast was also reportedly felt 200 kilometers away in Cyprus.

Specifically, 73 percent of more than 1,000 readers who responded to the poll do not believe the explosion was an accident compared to about 27 percent who thought it was back luck that the ammonium nitrate – unsafely stored for six years – has been the cause of the deadly Beirut blast.

The enormous explosion consequently created a mushroom cloud over Beirut, stoking fears and rumors on social media and, among conspiracy theorists, that a nuclear bomb has been detonated in the Lebanese capital due to the sheer magnitude of the blast.

About 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate was involved during Tuesday’s explosion. Ammonium nitrate is a crystal-like white solid commonly used as a source of nitrogen for agricultural fertilizer, and is relatively safe when stored properly. It, however, becomes deadly as an explosive when mixed with other chemicals and fuel oils.

Some experts pointed out that people who are not accustomed to seeing large explosions may confuse mushroom clouds and spherical blast waves as nuclear in nature.

Others believed the Beirut explosion lacked two hallmarks of a nuclear detonation: a ‘blinding white flash’ and a thermal pulse, or surge of heat, which would otherwise had started fires all over the area and severely burned people’s skin.