UK’s Prince William, wife Kate join Attenborough after film screening

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Prince William and Kate react with Naturalist David Attenborough, left, with their children in the gardens of Kensington Palace in London. (AP)
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David Attenborough joins Prince William to watch an outdoor screening of the naturalist’s upcoming film. (@KensingtonRoyal)
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Prince William and Prince Louis react as Prince George holds the tooth of a shark given to him by Naturalist Sir David Attenborough in the gardens of Kensington Palace in London. (AP)
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Updated 27 September 2020

UK’s Prince William, wife Kate join Attenborough after film screening

  • Prince William, who has followed his father Prince Charles in pursuing environmental causes, has previously interviewed Attenborough
  • The photographs showed William and Kate standing in the garden, surrounded by their three children

LONDON: Britain’s royal family have released pictures of Prince William, wife Kate and their three children joining the naturalist David Attenborough in the gardens of Kensington Palace.
The photographs were taken earlier this week after the 94-year-old broadcaster joined Prince William, Queen Elizabeth’s grandson and second-in-line to the throne, to watch an outdoor screening of Attenborough’s upcoming film.


The film, “David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet,” sets out his “witness statement” on the destruction of the environment and ideas on how humans can still put it right.
Prince William, who has followed his father Prince Charles in pursuing environmental causes, has previously interviewed Attenborough, and the queen presented him with an award for raising awareness of the danger of plastic pollution last year.


The photographs showed William and Kate standing in the garden, surrounded by their three children Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis, while Attenborough stood at a slight distance, sharing a joke with the family.


Study finds AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine follows genetic instructions

Updated 22 October 2020

Study finds AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine follows genetic instructions

  • Bristol University virology expert David Matthews: The vaccine is doing everything we expected and that is only good news in our fight against the illness
  • AstraZeneca, which is developing the vaccine with Oxford University researchers, is seen as a frontrunner in the race to produce a vaccine to protect against COVID-19

LONDON: AstraZeneca’s Oxford COVID-19 vaccine accurately follows the genetic instructions programmed into it by its developers to successfully provoke a strong immune response, according to a detailed analysis carried out by independent UK scientists.
“The vaccine is doing everything we expected and that is only good news in our fight against the illness,” said David Matthews, an expert in virology from Bristol University, who led the research.
AstraZeneca, which is developing the vaccine with Oxford University researchers, is seen as a frontrunner in the race to produce a vaccine to protect against COVID-19.
The first data from late-stage large-scale clinical trials being conducted in several countries around the world, including Brazil, the United States and Britain, are expected to be released before the end of the year.
The vaccine — known either as ChAdOx1 or AZD1222 — is made by taking a common cold virus called an adenovirus from chimpanzees and deleting about 20% of the virus’s instructions. This means it is impossible for the vaccine to replicate or cause disease in humans.
The Bristol researchers’ focus was to assess how often and how accurately the vaccine is copying and using the genetic instructions programmed into it by its designers. These instructions detail how to make the spike protein from the coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19.
Once the spike protein is made, the immune system reacts to it, training the immune system to identify a real COVID-19 infection.
“This is an important study as we are able to confirm that the genetic instructions underpinning this vaccine ... are correctly followed when they get into a human cell,” Matthews said in a statement about the work.
His team’s research was not peer reviewed by other scientists, but was published as a preprint before review.