A vital tradition: female artists in Casablanca exhibition discuss significance of textiles

A vital tradition: female artists in Casablanca exhibition discuss significance of textiles
This artwork is by Moroccan artist Amina Agueznay. (Supplied)
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Updated 13 November 2020

A vital tradition: female artists in Casablanca exhibition discuss significance of textiles

A vital tradition: female artists in Casablanca exhibition discuss significance of textiles
  • Jardin en Soi, an exhibition at Loft Art Gallery, examines the key role of traditional textiles in contemporary art and design

DUBAI: Three female artists have joined forces in Jardin en Soi (Inner Garden) in a show running until Nov. 30 at the Loft Art Gallery in Casablanca to uphold the importance of traditional textiles from their homeland. In one of the first exhibitions dedicated to the use of African textiles in contemporary art, each work by Moroccan artists Amina Agueznay and Ghizlane Sahli, and Joana Choumali from Ivory Coast offers a powerful marriage of contemporary forms and artisanal traditions. The artists believe in the preservation of age-old textile techniques as a way of also preserving their country’s heritage and identity.

The Healers by Joana Choumali




The work is part of the Ivorian artist Joana Choumali’s body of work entitled Albahian. (Supplied)

Three children dressed in golden pleated outfits complete with golden bands around their head stand in a dreamy tropical landscape of lush palm trees with a vibrant mix of colors. Titled The Healers, as if in reference to the name of the artwork, the children appear to beam with joy and hope, signaling the dawn of a new day. The work is part of the Ivorian artist Joana Choumali’s body of work entitled Albahian, which in the Agni language of the Akan group in the Ivory Coast, means “the first light of day.” “Every morning, I start my day with a walk at dawn,” Choumali said. “I then immerse myself in what surrounds me, in what I see and feel. During these walks, I also listen to my emotions and to what I feel.”

The work, like Choumali’s other artworks, is close to her previous series Ça va aller and Translation. “The intention here is different,” she said. “It is more intimate and introspective.” Choumali, the first African to win the prestigious Prix Pictet photography prize, created Albahian using mixed media composed of embroidery, quilting, collage and photomontage. In the creation of the work, like others in the series, she superimposed layers of transparent fabric on photographs of passers-by, silhouettes and still-lives that she took during the early morning. Here, real and imaginary worlds are woven together with a heightened sensitivity to the surrounding natural and cityscape of Chouamli’s hometown of Abidjan, the economic capital of Ivory Coast. “Like the morning light at the beginning of each new day, I observe and become aware of the change in my thoughts and my perception of realities. It is like a daily pilgrimage,” said Choumali. “My work becomes the materialisation of memories and dreams I had while walking and exploring the city.”

A Garden Inside by Amina Agueznay




The installation is made of textiles incorporating traditional Moroccan techniques. (Supplied)

A garden made of various shades of green natural dye spun wool shoots up from the floor of the gallery. Made by Moroccan artist Amina Agueznay, the work, with its uneven sized rectangular forms in varying heights, could also be a cityscape, albeit colored green. Agueznay, who trained as an architect and is also jewelry designer, is dedicated to preserving the craft of skilled artisans from her homeland. The installation, with its intricate pathways between the symbolic green rectangles, is made of textiles incorporating traditional Moroccan techniques. “As soon as I have obtained from the material the infinite freedom that I am looking for, I begin the work from a manual approach,” said Agueznay. “It is the hand that tames the material and it is the hand that also freezes it.” The artist’s “garden” is individualistic in nature—no two forms are alike and yet they merge as part of a greater whole—just like the idea of preserving one’s heritage through contemporary art.

Histoire de Tripes by Ghizlane Sahli




The piece is a work by Moroccan artist Ghizlane Sahli made in silk threads on plastic and metal from her series Histoire de Tripes. (Supplied)

An unordered mix of red cell-like forms comes together to form an anamorphic shape, similar to that of a human organ. The piece is a work by Moroccan artist Ghizlane Sahli made in silk threads on plastic and metal from her series Histoire de Tripes, in which she collected recycled plastic bottles, cleaned and cut them up, and then coated them in vegetable silk thread with the help of local Moroccan female artisans. Sahli referred to these silk-wrapped bottle tops as “the Alveoles”, which is the French word for “cells” or “alveoli.” Sahli’s abstract sculpture refers to French author Antonin Artaud’s 1947 work Body without Organs, which challenged the human body or individual’s social call for status in society. Artaud, like Sahli, challenges the notion of behavioral conditioning in favor of a free individual not confined by preset physical or mental notions. “I imagine a great hand that would grasp the human body and shake it vigorously in order to rid it of all its pollution acquired through religion, education, society and gender,” said Sahli. “I wanted Histoires de Tripes to address the inner purity of being.”


Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

Updated 04 December 2020

Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

AMSTERDAM: In May 2019, life was looking good for Palestinian singer-songwriter Rasha Nahas. She had begun to establish herself in Berlin — having moved there from her hometown of Haifa in 2017; her debut album — wrapped in 2018 — was just weeks away from being released; and she had a prospective tour of the Middle East and Europe lined up. 

“I feel like a lot of exciting things are happening and hopefully the album will bring more,” she told me then. “I’m not in a hurry, but I’m going full-power with all of my will and passion.”

Fast-forward to today and that debut album is still just weeks away from release. Not long after we spoke last year, Nahas began to experience pain in her wrists and hands. It quickly became serious enough that she went to see a doctor who diagnosed her with repetitive strain injury. 

Her debut album (cover pictured) is just weeks away from release. Supplied

“It was really hardcore,” she says. “Both my hands and wrists had very, very bad inflammation. I couldn’t type emails or hold my phone or carry groceries and stuff. It was basically from overplaying. It had been a very busy time with shows and traveling, and a lot of stress. That was good, in some ways, because it meant things were happening for me, but the mental stress also wasn’t good for my body. I just had to stop everything, take a break and focus on getting better.”

Having psyched herself up for the release of her album, the necessary postponement — and cancellation of her tour plans — was something of a comedown. 

“Everything was a big frustration,” she says. “And I couldn’t really let that energy out in music, because I wasn’t able to (play).”

That last part, especially, was a huge blow to someone for whom music has been “a place of escape and expression and dealing with things and understanding myself” since her early teens and has become the thing from which she makes her living — an impressive feat for any artist, but particularly an independent musician from the Middle East. 

Nahas first picked up a guitar – which actually belonged to her sister – when she was a kid. Supplied

Nahas first picked up a guitar when she was a kid. It actually belonged to her sister, who “took a few lessons then stopped.” 

“I would tune it in very weird ways and strum it and sing out of tune,” she says. “Then I decided to study guitar. The only available option that my parents liked was classical music. So for nine years I did classical guitar and theory. I wanted to drop it (often), but I’m glad I didn’t.”

Music was popular in the Nahas household — from classic Arab artists including Fayrouz (“My mother’s a big fan”) to Western artists. Nahas chose to listen mostly to the latter. “We had a massive collection of CDs in the car and every Saturday we’d drive to the Galilee with the windows open and very fresh air and listen to John Lennon. That’s my main memory of music from my childhood,” she says. As a teenager she branched out into hard rock, pop, jazz and more. Oh, and Avril Lavigne (“That’s a bit embarrassing now,” she admits). 

Music was popular in the Nahas household — from classic Arab artists to Western artists. Supplied

She estimates she wrote her first original song around the age of 15. “It probably sounded like a normal indie-rock song, but I think the (lyrical) content was quite different,” she says. “It was about life as a Palestinian girl understanding her identity, and asking questions — about the political situation too. Looking at it now, I think, ‘Woah! That’s what I was dealing with at the age of 15?’”

It took a few years before she felt she was developing her own identity as an artist, though. She played her first gig as she finished high school, aged 18, by which time she had about an hour’s worth of original material. 

It makes sense that Nahas had classical training and listened to a wide variety of genres growing up — and that she composes music for the theater professionally. Her songs, and particularly her vocal delivery, have a definite theatrical vibe, and there are hints of several influences — pop, indie rock, jazz, rockabilly, surrealism, punk, spoken-word, and more. The result is something that seems entirely organic and entirely honest. It’s not necessarily easily accessible, but it’s certainly some of the most interesting work you’ll hear from a contemporary Middle Eastern artist, at least in the English language. 

A still from the “Desert” music video. Supplied

The two singles released from the album so far — “The Clown” and title track “Desert” — are good examples; both showcasing her distinctive style. The former was written a month after Nahas moved to Berlin, aged 21 (because “I just needed to be away, make music and take time to just be and understand things”). “It came from a few days of thoughts that were gathering and piling up — about being away from home, about artists getting on stage and getting labeled as Palestinian or as Israeli, about the political situation that never really leaves you.”

The latter, released in November, was written around the same time. “It’s a very personal song talking about searching and the things that are changing around us,” Nahas explains. “In the video (shot in Haifa), we played a lot with metaphors and images — we have kids with guns, we have a dancer crucified on an olive tree to symbolize the ties to the land. We have an old, abandoned building in Haifa contrasted with the big glass buildings to ask ourselves where our identity — as Palestinian 48ers — fits between tradition and modern colonialism.”

“The Clown” is the first single from her debut album. Supplied

The search for identity is a central theme of Nahas’ debut album, which will finally see the light of day on January 29. “It was very influenced by the relocation from Palestine to Germany,” she says. “So it deals with questions of identity and of what our responsibility to our identity is. I come from this place that has a certain political weight, traditionally. So how do I deal with that weight? How do I sing about it? Who am I in it?”

The end to the record’s long delay will doubtless come as a huge relief to Nahas, after what she describes as “one of the heaviest years for me.” Her almost-complete recovery from injury all but coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the year also included the death of a close friend — one of the dancers in the “Desert” video. 

The search for identity is a central theme of Nahas’ debut album, which will finally see the light of day on January 29. Supplied

“That challenged my relationship with the (record). He was part of the creation, in a way. And the release was postponed because of the injury and the pandemic. I wished it had been finished and that he could have seen it, because he really put everything into it. So it just added another layer to everything.”

That heavy year hasn’t been entirely without positives though, she stresses. “Even though it’s been very unsettling, with my injury and the pandemic, it did ground something in me. It forced me to look inward more, but also to look at what’s around me and appreciate it and grow from it.”

She played her first gig as she finished high school, aged 18, by which time she had about an hour’s worth of original material. Supplied

Given the years between the album’s completion and release, I wonder if Nahas still feels as connected to the work. Her answer is a definite yes. 

“It captures a period in my life that I needed to capture and I’m really happy I did that. The songs came from a very honest place. That’s the most important thing — I feel like that doesn’t get old,” she says. “ So, it doesn’t matter when it comes out, because it’s real and it’s truthful — and I’m sure that will be reflected in the interaction with the people who are going to listen to it.”