Finland tops global happiness index for second consecutive year

A Finnish resident takes a picture with US President Donald Trump impersonator Dennis Alan in front of the presidential palace in Helsinki in this July 15, 2018 photo. (AFP)
Updated 20 March 2019

Finland tops global happiness index for second consecutive year

  • The World Happiness Report ranks 156 countries by how happy their citizens see themselves to be
  • Happiness has declined the most drastically in the past ten years in the 108th placed Venezuela

HELSINKI: Finland has topped an index of the happiest nations for the second consecutive year, with researchers saying the small Nordic country has succeeded in generating a happiness recipe not simply dependent on economic wealth.
The World Happiness Report, produced by the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, ranks 156 countries by how happy their citizens see themselves to be. It’s based on factors including economic wealth, life expectancy, social support and freedom to make life choices.
The index, published Wednesday, showed the other Nordic countries did well, with Denmark, Norway and Iceland taking the next spots.
The United States dropped from the 18th to 19th place.
Happiness has declined the most drastically in the past ten years in the 108th placed Venezuela, currently in political crisis.


Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

Updated 13 November 2019

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

ATHENS, Greece: An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.
Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 6th century B.C. pottery vessel was considered lost for decades until research in 2014 by archaeologist Giorgos Kavvadias identified it in the University of Muenster’s collections.
A ministry statement says it was proved “beyond any doubt” that the two-handled cup painted with ancient runners was the one given to Spiros Louis, the Greek marathon victor in 1896.
Following correspondence with Greek officials, the university agreed to return the cup, which was part of a private German collection it had bought in 1986.
The vessel was presented at a ceremony Wednesday at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.