Southampton boss Hasenhuettl warns over video games ‘addiction’

Ralph Hasenhuettl admitted to blocking hotel Wi-Fi during away trips while in charge of former club RB Leipzig. (Reuters)
Updated 28 March 2019

Southampton boss Hasenhuettl warns over video games ‘addiction’

  • Ralph Hasenhuettl has compared the habit of spending excessive amounts of time playing video games to alcoholism and drug addiction
  • The Austrian was speaking after an anonymous English Football League player revealed lengthy gaming sessions were threatening to ruin his career

LONDON: Southampton manager Ralph Hasenhuettl has compared the habit of spending excessive amounts of time playing video games to alcoholism and drug addiction, saying footballers need protection.
The Austrian was speaking after an anonymous English Football League player revealed lengthy gaming sessions were threatening to ruin his career.
Hasenhuettl admitted to blocking hotel Wi-Fi during away trips while in charge of former club RB Leipzig.
“I think it’s something you have to force actively against and I will do this,” he said at his pre-match press conference ahead of Saturday’s Premier League trip to Brighton.
“I did it in my last club, we had also problems with players, they were playing until three o’clock in the morning before a game.
“You have to be active and to help protect them because it’s not a small problem because if you are honest it’s the same as alcoholism or getting addicted to drugs.”
Hasenhuettl feels it would be easier to tackle video-game addiction if it were seen as an illness but does not believe any of his Saints squad currently have serious problems with gaming.
“In my own squad, at the moment no,” he said. “But you can be sure that I’m always in contact with my captain or with a few players to speak about them.”
“As long as it’s not officially for the government an illness, then we have to protect them in our way,” he added.
“If it would be an illness then it would be easy for the government to say the companies have to give a block after three hours, for example, that they cannot play this game any more.
“I will be active always in this direction because I have to protect them and also outside the pitch and that means for 24 hours I have to look at them and that’s what I will do.”


Man eats $120,000 piece of art — a banana taped to wall

Updated 9 min 39 sec ago

Man eats $120,000 piece of art — a banana taped to wall

MIAMI: The move was bananas ... or maybe the work was just too appealing.
A performance artist shook up the crowd at the Art Basel show in Miami Beach on Saturday when he grabbed a banana that had been duct-taped to a gallery wall and ate it.
The banana was, in fact, a work of art by Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan titled “Comedian” and sold to a French collector for $120,000.
In a video posted on his Instagram account, David Datuna, who describes himself as a Georgian-born American artist living in New York, walks up to the banana and pulls it off the wall with the duct tape attached.
“Art performance ... hungry artist,” he said, as he peeled the fruit and took a bite. “Thank you, very good.”
A few bystanders could be heard giggling before a flustered gallery official whisked him to an adjoining space for questioning.
But the kerfuffle was resolved without a food fight.
“He did not destroy the art work. The banana is the idea,” Lucien Terras, director of museum relations for Galerie Perrotin, told the Miami Herald.
As it turns out, the value of the work is in the certificate of authenticity, the newspaper said. The banana is meant to be replaced.
A replacement banana was taped to the wall about 15 minutes after Datuna’s stunt.
“This has brought a lot of tension and attention to the booth and we’re not into spectacles,” Terras said. “But the response has been great. It brings a smile to a lot of people’s faces.”
Cattelan is perhaps best known for his 18-carat, fully functioning gold toilet called “America” that he had once offered on loan to US President Donald Trump.
The toilet, valued at around $5 to $6 million, was in the news again in September when it was stolen from Britain’s Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of wartime leader Winston Churchill, where it had been on display.