Window on the past as ‘Red Palace’ exhibition opens in Jeddah

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Fifteen Saudi and Arab artists will present interpretations of the historic oil deal signed between the Kingdom and US at Khuzam Palace in 1933, exploring the agreement’s social and cultural impact on the Kingdom. (SPA)
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Fifteen Saudi and Arab artists will present interpretations of the historic oil deal signed between the Kingdom and US at Khuzam Palace in 1933, exploring the agreement’s social and cultural impact on the Kingdom. (SPA)
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Fifteen Saudi and Arab artists will present interpretations of the historic oil deal signed between the Kingdom and US at Khuzam Palace in 1933, exploring the agreement’s social and cultural impact on the Kingdom. (SPA)
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Fifteen Saudi and Arab artists will present interpretations of the historic oil deal signed between the Kingdom and US at Khuzam Palace in 1933, exploring the agreement’s social and cultural impact on the Kingdom. (SPA)
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Fifteen Saudi and Arab artists will present interpretations of the historic oil deal signed between the Kingdom and US at Khuzam Palace in 1933, exploring the agreement’s social and cultural impact on the Kingdom. (SPA)
Updated 07 June 2019

Window on the past as ‘Red Palace’ exhibition opens in Jeddah

  • Groundbreaking display explores Riyadh palace’s historic role

JEDDAH: The “Red Palace” exhibition — a groundbreaking exploration of the Kingdom’s artistic, political and economic past — will open its doors in Jeddah following a three-month display at its historic namesake in Riyadh.

The exhibition will be on show at Khuzam Palace in Jeddah from June 8 to July 18.

Under the supervision of the Ministry of Culture, the exhibition will include an artistic presentation on the history of the Red Palace, and its national and political importance in the Kingdom’s history.

Fifteen Saudi and Arab artists will present interpretations of the historic oil deal signed between the Kingdom and US at Khuzam Palace in 1933, exploring the agreement’s social and cultural impact on the Kingdom.

HIGHLIGHTS

• The exhibition will include an artistic presentation on the history of the Red Palace, and its national and political importance in the Kingdom’s history.

• Artists will display innovative works based around oil, reflecting the identity of the Kingdom and the role played by oil products since the signing of the agreement.

• The Ministry of Culture aims to highlight various creative aspects of the Kingdom’s history.

• The event will be on show at Khuzam Palace in Jeddah from June 8 to July 18, 2019.

Khuzam Palace, the first residence of King Abdul Aziz, was chosen as the site for the “Red Palace” exhibition in recognition of its important role in the history of the Kingdom.

The exhibition celebrates the Red Palace, built by King Abdul Aziz in 1943 for his son King Saud in Riyadh.

The palace has had a pivotal role in the history of the Kingdom. It was King Saud’s official residence, where he hosted visitors to the Kingdom, ranging from Arab representatives to worldwide leaders. 

The palace then became the headquarters of the Council of Ministers under the reign of King Faisal and then King Khalid and then the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Fahd, before becoming the headquarters of the Board of Grievances.

The history of the Red Palace was used to create an innovative story reflecting the value of the palace in both social and national dimensions.

Artists will display innovative works based around oil, reflecting the identity of the Kingdom and the role played by oil products since the signing of the agreement.

The Ministry of Culture aims to highlight various creative aspects of the Kingdom’s history, with artists presenting their own interpretations and their vision of the impact on society.

The exhibition is divided into seven chapters, with art pieces displayed in different forms in 14 rooms.

In the first room (Chapter I) titled “Red Palace” is the piece “To Dust You Will Return.” In Chapter II, titled “1979,” are two pieces, “1979”and “Taqa.”

BACKGROUND

• The Red Palace was King Saud’s official residence, where he hosted visitors to the Kingdom, ranging from Arab representatives to worldwide leaders.

• The palace then became the headquarters of the Council of Ministers under the reign of King Faisal and then King Khalid and then the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Fahd, before becoming the headquarters of the Board of Grievances.

• The history of the Red Palace was used to create an innovative story reflecting the value of the palace in both social and national dimensions.

Chapter III, titled “Labor Force,” includes “Labor Force 1: Trusteeship Trip,” “Labor Force 2: Preparing Dinner,” and “Labor Force 3: Polishing.”

Chapter IV is titled “Stormy Desert,” while the eighth room includes the piece “Distress.”

Chapter V includes many pieces such as “The Role of Bush,”  “Broken Phone” and “Confidence.” Chapter VI, titled “Dinner at the Palace,” includes “Dinner at the Palace” and “1440 m.” Finally, Chapter VII, titled “Praying Room,” includes a piece of the same name.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 5 min 12 sec ago

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.