International community must help stop Israeli aggression against Al-Aqsa: Arab League

Israeli security forces clashed with Palestinian worshippers last week. (AFP/File photo)
Updated 21 August 2019

International community must help stop Israeli aggression against Al-Aqsa: Arab League

  • The statement came after Jordan summoned Israel’s ambassador Sunday in protest over 'violations' at the holy compound

CAIRO: The Arab League on Wednesday called on the international community to take responsibility in stopping Israeli aggression against Al-Aqsa Mosque.

The statement came after Jordan summoned Israel’s ambassador Sunday in protest over “violations” at the holy compound.

Israeli security forces clashed with Palestinian worshippers last week and an Israeli minister sparked anger when he said the country should work toward Jews being allowed to pray at the site.

The Arab Leeague said the rules of international law need to be used to stop the crimes that violate the holy site in Jerusalem “on a daily basis.”

“The (international community’s) continued absence is an encouragement to the occupation and to the continuation of its crimes in absence of the just peace that the people of the region aspire to,” the Arab League said.

The Assistant Secretary-General for Palestine and the Occupied Arab Territories at the Arab League, Said Abu Ali, condemned the ongoing Israeli crimes against Jerusalem and its institutions, monuments and sanctuaries, saying the Arab League remained steadfast in its support of Jerusalem and the Palestinian people to protect their rights and the holy sites.


France to press to drop Sudan from US terror blacklist

Updated 20 min 15 sec ago

France to press to drop Sudan from US terror blacklist

  • Jean-Yves Le Drian is the second top western diplomat to visit Sudan this month
  • SUNA says Le Drian will meet with Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, the head of the newly appointed Sovereign Council

KHARTOUM: French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said Monday that France will press to drop Sudan from the US blacklist of state sponsors of terrorism and to support efforts to reintegrate the country into the international community.
Le Drian was in Khartoum for a one-day visit, the first such trip to Sudan by France's top diplomat in more than a decade.
His visit comes as the northeast African country transitions to civilian rule after decades of authoritarianism.
"We will use our influence to ensure that Sudan is removed from this list," Le Drian said at a joint press conference with his Sudanese counterpart Asma Mohamed Abdalla after the two held talks.
"It is the way to ensure that we can consider a new relationship (for Sudan) with financial institutions, everything is obviously linked," he said, asked by AFP if France would back efforts to remove Sudan from Washington's blacklist.
Decades of US blacklisting along with a trade embargo imposed on Sudan in 1997 has kept overseas investors away from the country, in turn isolating it from the global economy.
Sudan's worsening economic situation was the key trigger for nationwide protests that finally led to the ouster of longtime ruler Omar al-Bashir in April.
Washington lifted the sanctions in October 2017, but kept Sudan in the terrorism list along with North Korea, Iran and Syria.
Washington's measures were imposed for Khartoum's alleged support for Islamist militant groups.
Al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden resided in Sudan between 1992 and 1996.
Le Drian said the pivotal role played by Sudan's army in the uprising against Bashir would help in removing Sudan from the US blacklist.
"The way the army perceived its role during this period, (that) goes in the direction of removing Sudan from this list," he said.
The army overthrew Bashir in a palace coup on April 11 on the back of months of nationwide protests.
But a military council seized power after ousting him and for months resisted calls from protesters to transfer it to a civilian administration.
Only last month after sustained agitation, a joint civilian-military sovereign council was sworn in to oversee Sudan's transition to civilian rule, the key demand of protesters.
On September 8, Sudan's first cabinet led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was sworn in to run the daily affairs of the country.
During his short visit to Khartoum, Le Drian also met Hamdok and General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, head of the civilian-military ruling council.
Le Drian also reiterated French support for Sudan's priorities such as rebuilding the economy and striking peace agreements with rebel groups in conflict zones of Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile states.