Huda Kattan expands beauty empire with new skincare line

Huda Kattan is ranked in the top 40 of Forbes’ 2019 list of the wealthiest self-made female entrepreneurs in the US. (Getty)
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Updated 13 January 2020

Huda Kattan expands beauty empire with new skincare line

  • The beauty guru announced she will soon release products from her new skincare line

DUBAI: Iraqi-US makeup entrepreneur Huda Kattan is about to drop her latest launch, Huda Beauty Skin.

The beauty guru announced the news Sunday on her Instagram accounts. 

Kattan has always been open about her skin imperfections. “I’ve said it before, but my skin has been a JOURNEY,” she wrote in the post. 

Despite her extensive knowledge of makeup, Kattan was never satisfied with her skin, she said. “As a kid I had really dry-sensitive skin, that was super rough and uneven in tone and texture, and at 19 I started dealing with cystic adult acne,” she wrote. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Our first ever post on @hudabeautyskin Guys make sure you follow! Lots of exciting things coming!

A post shared by HUDA KATTAN (@hudabeauty) on

There were days when Kattan says she felt insecure about her skin, adding that she could not leave her house because her acne was “painful and bad.”

According to the mogul, her skin improvement was all thanks to “blogging and experimenting.”

“What happened was truly unexpected! My skin became so soft, even smooth, my pores disappeared, and my acne was (finally) under control,” she said.

On her new Huda Beauty Skin page, Kattan shared before and after clips of herself a little over a year ago and now. “I can't believe it! Before with makeup and less confidence, After, with our new skincare line, absolutely no makeup, but so much confidence!” she wrote in the post. 

“Both of these are during basic breakouts (nothing severe), but my skin texture is sooooo different!! Even my neck looks better! (sic)” she added. 

Kattan is ranked in the top 40 of Forbes’ 2019 list of the wealthiest self-made female entrepreneurs in the US, with a reported net worth of $610 million. She has a makeup line, a fragrance line and now a skincare line.


A hairy situation: Facial hair proves a hot topic as coronavirus worries grow

According to the CDC, beards can interfere with the correct usage of masks and respirators. (File/Shutterstock)
Updated 31 March 2020

A hairy situation: Facial hair proves a hot topic as coronavirus worries grow

  • We take a look at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s advice on mustaches, mutton chops and suave soul patches

DUBAI: With conflicting news reports from media outlets around the world stating that men should — or don’t need to — shave off their prized facial hair in order to protect themselves from the novel coronavirus, we take a look at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s advice on mustaches, mutton chops and suave soul patches.

Earlier this month, the Welsh Ambulance service advised that medical personnel should “reach for the razor (as) facial hair can disrupt the effectiveness of personal protective equipment” in a tweet and the head of France's ER doctors association advised medical staff to shave off their beards for hygiene reasons. However, these measures are mainly aimed at medical staff who rely on masks and respirators, while advice for the general public has not yet touched upon facial hair as a potential danger in the spread of coronavirus.

What’s clear, however, is the fact that beards can interfere with the correct usage of masks and respirators.

Masks and respirators are being utilized all around the world in a bid to help curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. But according to a recently resurfaced 2017 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) infographic, one’s facial hair can interfere with how effective these filtering items are.

The infographic shows 36 different facial hair styles and provides names for each of them — some of which could be unknown to even the savviest barbers. It also tells you which facial hair styles would and would not work well with a “filtering facepiece respirator” like the P2/N95 respirator, that may protect you against small airborne microbes if worn properly.

While handlebars, lampshades and soul patches are deemed good to go, other facial hair styles, such as mutton chops and a full beard are advised against.

According to the infographic, facial hair can pose a risk to the effectiveness of masks because it may interfere with respirators that rely on a tight facepiece seal to achieve maximum protection.

In short, making sure there’s a good seal between the mask and the wearer’s face is a vital part of respiratory protection, however facial hair can compromise that seal.

The CDC recommends that any facial hair that can fit entirely under a close-fitting respirator should be fine. Where it looks like you might have some problems is if your facial hair is long enough or covers enough of your face that it pushes against the seal of the respirator, thereby allowing airborne particles to leak through.

However, it’s important to note that the CDC only recommends facial masks and facepiece respirators for those who work in the healthcare industry and those who are coming into contact with people who could be potentially infected with the disease, as well as individuals with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19.