Weight loss campaign challenges Saudi residents to lose 300 tons

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Social media star Adwa Al-Dakheel speaks at the launch of the health initiative in Riyadh. (AN photo)
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Obesity is a major health concern in Saudi Arabia. (AN photo)
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Obesity is a major health concern in Saudi Arabia. (AN photo)
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Obesity is a major health concern in Saudi Arabia. (AN photo)
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Updated 02 February 2020

Weight loss campaign challenges Saudi residents to lose 300 tons

  • Everyone who attends a weigh-in will be eligible for free consultations about diet and weight loss plans, and even if they do not lose any weight they can enter prize draws for smaller gifts and monetary prizes

RIYADH: A new national campaign aims to help residents of Saudi Arabia to adopt healthier lifestyles and shed 300 tons of excess weight by the end of the year.
Saudi retail pharmacy chain Nahdi Medical Company began its weight loss initiative last week with a launch event at Riyadh’s Granada Mall.
The competitive “Wazen Hayatak” (Balance Your Life) program aims to create an environment that encourages the adoption of a more healthy, active and balanced lifestyle, to help transform Saudi society in line with the aims of Vision 2030.
Obesity is a major health concern in the Kingdom, said Hani Ismail, Nahdi’s chief marketing officer.
“Saudi Arabia is currently No. 29 on the list of countries with the most overweight citizens, with 59.4 percent of Saudis overweight,” he said. “The current costs of both prevention and cure of excess weight stand at SR19 billion ($5.06 billion), according to the most recent report, from 2018.”
If the prospect of carrying around less weight and enjoying the benefits of a healthier lifestyle are not incentive enough to take part in the campaign, Nahdi is also offering a prize of SR100,000 at each of three weigh-ins during the campaign to the person who has lost the most weight, proportionally, plus a further SR100,000 to the person who loses the most weight overall.
Everyone who attends a weigh-in will also be eligible for free consultations about diet and weight loss plans, and even if they do not lose any weight they can enter prize draws for smaller gifts and monetary prizes.
Sarah Turkistani, senior health and community service manager at Nahdi, told the audience at the launch that the campaign was close to her heart on a personal level.
“My whole life changed when we started the Wazen Hayatak program,” she said. “We started it as an in-house campaign for employees of Nahdi and were pleasantly surprised when we reached a total weight loss of 500 kilograms.

HIGHLIGHTS

• The program offers hundreds of thousands of riyals in prizes.

• Everyone who attends a weigh-in will also be eligible for free consultations about diet and weight loss plans.

“We did it a second time in Jeddah, in a small group of 30 pharmacies, and in just three months, our participants lost a total of 3,000 kg. We decided then that we had to make it bigger.”
Certified fitness trainers then guided the crowd through a variety of basic exercises and invited onlookers to get active by taking part in some fun activities. A number of weighing stations were available for people to get accurate measurements of their weight, body fat percentage and muscle mass index.
During Nahdi’s first public Wazen Hayatak program in Jeddah, which ended in January 2016, 2,772 participants lost a total of 3.7 tons.
The public face of the campaign is Saudi entrepreneur and social-media star Adwa Al-Dakheel, who took part in a public weigh-in.
“This initiative is more than just a campaign; this is a lifestyle,” she said.
Nahdi Medical Company is a leading chain of Saudi retail pharmacies, with a network of stores in 125 cities and villages across the Kingdom.


Turning a new leaf: Saudi Arabia’s Jazan region ditches qat crops for coffee trees

The growth of the educational landscape in the region, in addition to the success of the coffee industry, are some factors that help the authorities combat qat abuse. (SPA/Supplied)
Updated 24 February 2020

Turning a new leaf: Saudi Arabia’s Jazan region ditches qat crops for coffee trees

  • The Khawlani coffee bean is being offered to UNESCO for inclusion on a heritage list

JAZAN: Efforts to draw the younger generation in the Kingdom’s Jazan region away from the harmful and addictive substance qat are succeeding, with even the crop being replaced by coffee trees to support the booming coffee business.
Qat, a plant that is native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, is a stimulant that triggers excitement and alertness. But it can also cause anxiety, insomnia and aggravate pre-existing mental health conditions.
It grew in the Jazan region along with coffee trees. But the strength of the coffee industry, combined with an increased awareness about the harmful nature of qat, has led to its gradual disappearance.
The governor of Al-Dayer, Nayef bin Lebdah, said the people of Jazan were proud of the Khawlani coffee bean. He also said that coffee beans were much more economically beneficial than qat.
“All newly planted qat trees have been completely uprooted,” he told Arab News. “All the people have found that planting coffee beans is much more feasible and rewarding than qat. Attempts to smuggle qat have also dropped thanks to the security efforts along the border with Yemen. Add to that, young people themselves have concluded that their future will be in coffee beans.”
Teacher Yahiya Shareef Al-Maliki viewed qat as an “intruder’’ and said the coffee tree was the region’s indigenous product.
“In 1970, there were only four people who used to chew qat in the entire governorate,” he told Arab News. “It then started to become common among the people here in 1995 due to opening the borders that caused importing qat from abroad.”

FASTFACTS

• In 2014, people reconsidered coffee as an alternative crop and young people started to grow coffee beans with the help of unlimited support from the governorate.

• Some 50,000 seedlings were distributed and farmers began to restore the profession of their fathers.

• The governorate replanted more than 10,000 genuine Khawlani coffee seedlings and gave them to the farmers.

The increase in qat cultivation affected the planting of coffee beans, he added, but in 2014 people reconsidered coffee as an alternative crop and young people started to grow coffee beans with the help of unlimited support from the governorate. “Some 50,000 seedlings were distributed and farmers began to restore the profession of their fathers.”
People in Jazan used to waste their time and money on qat, he said. They would gather and chew qat for many hours, he added, hours that could have been spent working. But the growth of the educational landscape in the region, in addition to the success of the coffee industry, was a factor in combating qat abuse, as young people were able to access more opportunities and improve their prospects.
The Khawlani coffee bean is being offered to UNESCO for inclusion on a heritage list.
“The preparation of the file related to the skills and knowledge pertaining to the cultivation of Khawlani coffee in the Jazan region has been completed before presenting it to UNESCO,” the Kingdom’s Culture Minister Prince Badr bin Abdullah said. If listed, he added, it would be the Kingdom’s fourth intangible cultural heritage and eighth among the total heritage items included in the UNESCO heritage list.
Saudi columnist Hamood Abu Talib said the Jazan region was the only place the beans were grown. “This festival (Coffee Beans Festival), which is being held in collaboration with the governorate (of Jazan), the farmers themselves and Aramco, is an important national economic investment,” he told Arab News.
“Many countries’ economies, such as Brazil and Ethiopia depend mainly on this product — coffee. It needs professional marketing through the media to attract visitors from inside and outside the Kingdom. This is an essential strategic transformation.
“We know that the Faifa Mountains Development and Reconstruction Authority’s strategic goal was to uproot the harmful trees of qat and replace them with profitable crops that are beneficial to the farmers as well as the whole region. These were also intruding, invasive trees. We replanted more than 10,000 genuine Khawlani coffee seedlings and gave them to the farmers.”