Rocket attack hits north Iraq base hosting US troops

Iraqi security forces leave a military base as Kurdish forces take over control in Kirkuk June 11, 2014. (Reuters)
Short Url
Updated 13 February 2020

Rocket attack hits north Iraq base hosting US troops

  • It was the first attack on the K1 base since December 27

BAGHDAD: A mortar shell slammed into an air base hosting US troops in northern Iraq late Thursday causing no casualties, two Iraqi security officias said.
The shell struck the K1 Iraqi military air base in Kirkuk province, according to the security sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media. They provided no additional details.
A rocket attack on the same base in December triggered a chain of retaliatory events that led to soaring US-Iran tensions and brought Iraq to the brink of war.
On Thursday, Iraqi forces conducted a search of the perimeter of the base and discovered a launching pad and 11 unused missiles, a statement from Iraq’s military said.
A rocket attack on K1 killed a US contractor on Dec. 27 and led Washington to conduct an airstrike that killed top Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani and senior Iraqi militia commander Abu Mahdi Al-Muhandis.
The attack infuriated Shiite Iraqi lawmakers who voted to oust US troops from the country in a Jan. 3 Parliament session. Iran retaliated for Soleimani’s killing with a barrage of missiles that targeted two air bases hosting American troops in Irbil and Ain Al-Asad.
Iran and the US have since refrained from further escalation, but the issue of American troops has monopolized Iraqi politics.

Related


Lebanon extends coronavirus regulations until July 5

Updated 05 June 2020

Lebanon extends coronavirus regulations until July 5

  • This is the sixth extension since they were first implemented
  • More beneficiaries were included on the list to receive COVID-19 aid

DUBAI: The Lebanese government has extended its ‘general mobilization against coronavirus’ for another four weeks.
The extension, the sixth since it was first adopted on March 15, was based on recommendations from Lebanon’s Higher Defense Council.
“The measures are still urgent to avert any second wave whose consequences will be difficult to treat,” the country’s information minister Manal Abdel-Samad said.
Lebanon’s government is still committed to the five-stage plan of reopening and security forces will help oversee violations of measures, he added.
Authorities have started the second wave of financial aid distribution to those negatively impacted by COVID-19, Prime Minister Hassan Diab meanwhile said.
The government has included more beneficiaries ‘n line with field studies carried out by the Lebanese Army in direct cooperation with the Interior Ministry, municipalities and mokhtars,’ Abdul-Samad said.
Authorities will allow protests if people wear masks, avoid blocking roads, do not vandalize public or private properties, refrain from clashing with security forces and non-participating civilians, she added.
“We are with the right to protest but that right can transform into chaos if there is a return to blocking roads, vandalizing public and private property … I don’t think that any Lebanese person accepts these practices, which don’t resemble democratic expression,” Abdul-Samad said.