This is the UAE salon behind Ivanka Trump’s hair

LaLoge was entrusted as Trump’s official hairstylist during her whirlwind Dubai visit. (Supplied)
Short Url
Updated 17 February 2020

This is the UAE salon behind Ivanka Trump’s hair

DUBAI: The President of the United States’ daughter and senior advisor, Ivanka Trump, touched down in the UAE this week to deliver a keynote speech at the official opening of the Global Women's Forum Dubai (GWFD) held at the city’s Madinat Jumeirah on Sunday.

For the occasion, Trump donned a mustard-colored satin tie-front midi dress from Jonathan Simkhai paired with nude Gianvito Rossi pumps as she praised gender equality progress in the region.

When it came to her hair, the former model and senior political advisor opted to keep her recently-debuted chunky highlights sleek and center-parted, courtesy of Dubai-based salon LaLoge, which was entrusted as Trump’s official hairstylist during her whirlwind Dubai visit.

The cult salon, which was founded by Emirati businesswoman Reem Abou Samra, is currently one of the most buzz-worthy beauty lounges in the UAE, and boasts two locations, including the newly-opened hot spot at The Address Sky View. In addition to hair, the luxury salon also offers nail and facial services— Though it’s unknown whether the beauty parlour was also responsible for Trump’s lit-from-within skin. 

 


5 ways to manage your mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

In order to navigate through this new “normal,” it is imperative to focus on your mental wellbeing. (Shutterstock)
Updated 5 min 52 sec ago

5 ways to manage your mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

  • Dr. Saliha Afridi, a clinical psychologist, shares five ways to manage and maintain mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

DHAHRAN: With the rapid spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) worldwide, a barrage of distressing news and statistics, as well as unprecedented challenges at home and in the workplace, it is only natural to feel overwhelmed, anxious and stressed.

Dr. Saliha Afridi, a clinical psychologist and managing director of The LightHouse Arabia, a Dubai-based community mental health and wellness clinic, explained that “in such unprecedented, unpredictable, and uncertain times, it is completely normal to feel these emotions.” In order to navigate through this new “normal,” it is imperative to focus on your mental wellbeing. 

Afridi shared five ways to manage and maintain mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Establish a routine

Establish a routine that incorporates your physical, spiritual and emotional-mental wellbeing. (Shutterstock) 

“Routines anchor us and provide a rhythm to life,” she said. Based on priorities, Afridi advises that individuals establish a routine that incorporates their physical, spiritual and emotional-mental wellbeing.

Focus on what you can control

“Physical action (control) will give mental control, overpowering fear,” said Afridi. (Shutterstock)

Instead of focusing on what you cannot do, Afridi suggests shifting your energy and focusing on what you can do. One can exercise, practice healthy eating habits and maintain recommended hygiene like washing your hands. “We fear things that we cannot control. Physical action (control) will give mental control, overpowering fear,” she explained. Another approach to lessening anxiety over the situation is to take it one day at a time. 

Use positive language

Afridi suggested using positive language to express or frame your experience. (Shutterstock)

Afridi opined that the terms “social isolation and distancing” were relevant to a time before global connectivity. “Although a physical connection may be missing, we are connected — more than ever — to our family, friends, colleagues and teams.” She suggested using positive language to express or frame your experience. Instead of saying “I am scared of catching the virus,” an example of empowered language that overcomes negativity would be: “I am staying indoors and building immunity.”

Limit your news intake

Feed your brain by focusing on productive actions or learning something new. (Shutterstock)

Afridi likened human behavior of stockpiling food and supplies to that of stockpiling information. “The mind is trying to get a grip of what is happening. We believe the more information we have, the more we can assess or control the situation,” she said. “But this only feeds the beast — anxiety.” She recommended choosing one news organization and one health organization as sources of information and limiting your news intake to once a day, preferably mid-day. Instead, feed your brain by focusing on productive actions or learning something new. 

Repurpose your space

Afridi suggested repurposing your space from stark and cluttered to clean and soothing. (Shutterstock)

Even if you are confined to one bedroom, make it work for you. Afridi suggested repurposing your space from stark and cluttered to clean and soothing. Engage your five senses, for example, light candles or incense to create a pleasant environment. “If there is chaos and clutter on the outside, there will be chaos on the inside,” she explained.