Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Ghani Khayat, Saudi ambassador to Kenya

Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Ghani Khayat
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Updated 10 March 2020

Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Ghani Khayat, Saudi ambassador to Kenya

  • Khayat is also Saudi Arabia’s nonresident ambassador to Somalia and Malawi and the country’s permanent representative to the UN in the Kenyan capital Nairobi

Dr. Mohammed bin Abdul Ghani Khayat, the Saudi ambassador to Kenya, recently met with Seychelles President Danny Faure in his capacity as the Kingdom’s first nonresident envoy to the east African nation of islands.
Khayat is also Saudi Arabia’s nonresident ambassador to Somalia and Malawi and the country’s permanent representative to the UN in the Kenyan capital Nairobi.
He gained a bachelor’s degree in political science from King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah and a diploma from the Institute of Diplomatic Studies in Riyadh before going on to obtain a master’s degree from Charles University in the Czech Republic and a Ph.D. from the Lebanese University in Lebanon.
Khayat has served his country in several capacities. He spent three years as deputy ambassador in The Hague and for six months was the director of the Dialogue and Alliance of Civilizations’ management at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
For 10 months he also worked as director general for the general department of Islamic organizations’ affairs and served for 18 months on the board of the King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz International Center for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue.


Saudi envoy to UK calls for more cooperation amid pandemic

Updated 10 min 2 sec ago

Saudi envoy to UK calls for more cooperation amid pandemic

  • Prince Khalid said the Saudi economy is performing better than some expected

LONDON: Saudi Ambassador to the UK Prince Khalid bin Bandar bin Sultan Al-Saud has called for greater cooperation between the two kingdoms amid the coronavirus crisis.

Writing in Britain’s Daily Telegraph newspaper, the envoy said Saudi Arabia and the UK “have lost too many people to the virus,” and referred to the similarities between the two nations in their moves to secure the long-term strength of their economies.

Prince Khalid said Britain and Saudi Arabia enjoy a close relationship, and he feels “very strongly that our two nations can help each other meet the challenges of these very difficult times.”

He added that many Britons work in Saudi companies and vice versa, and while the links between the two kingdoms have often revolved around business, the liberalized leisure opportunities brought about by the Vision 2030 reform plan will make for a rise in tourism and travel. 

Prince Khalid said the Saudi economy is performing better than some expected. Praising his country’s move to privatize Saudi Aramco, he said share prices in the company have reached pre-COVID-19 levels.

But as openness and thriving business and tourism relationships have grown between the Middle East and the West, the envoy expressed fears that some are threatening to use COVID-19 as an opportunity to erect barriers worldwide. 

This cannot “be the legacy of corona,” he said. “We can’t allow a division to emerge between East and West, we must all work together to build a prosperous open global trading legacy.

“Britain and Saudi Arabia, as countries that in different ways are both dependent on global trade, must work together to make sure that the world makes the right choice.”