After blast in Syria town, US says rise in attacks troubling

A US soldier stands by a fighting armoured vehicle during a patrol near the Rumaylan (Rmeilan) oil fields in Syria's Kurdish-controlled northeastern Hasakeh province, on October 5, 2020. (AFP)
Short Url
Updated 08 October 2020

After blast in Syria town, US says rise in attacks troubling

  • Clashes between pro-regime forces and Daesh militants ‘killed 90 combatants this month’

WASHINGTON, BEIRUT: The US on Wednesday said it was troubled by a recent rise in attacks in Syria, a day after a blast in the northwest town of Al-Bab killed at least 11 people.

“The United States strongly condemns the terrorist attack near a crowded traffic circle in Al-Bab yesterday,” US State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said in a statement, adding that other reports indicated more than 20 people were killed. “We are deeply troubled by the rise in such terrorist attacks in recent months.”

Clashes in the Syrian Desert between pro-government forces and holdouts of Daesh have killed at least 90 combatants this month, a war monitor said on Wednesday.

Russian aircraft carried out strikes in support of their Syrian regime ally, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

The clashes broke out in two separate areas of the vast desert that separates the Orontes Valley in the west from the Euphrates Valley in the east.

The government side lost 41 dead, the rebels 49, the Britain-based war monitor said.

At least 10 government loyalists and 13 Daesh men were killed over the past 24 hours alone, Observatory head Rami Abdul Rahman said.

Daesh is “trying to prove that it is still strong,” he added.

Mobile Daesh units have remained active in the Syrian Desert, known in Arabic as the Badia, since the militants lost the last shred of its self-proclaimed caliphate in March last year.

September clashes killed 13 pro-regime fighters and 15 rebels, while in early July 20 pro-regime fighters and 31 rebels were killed over two days.

In August, Daesh claimed an attack, presumably mounted from the desert, that killed a Russian general near the Euphrates Valley city of Deir Ezzor.

Corona deaths

Meanwhile, the sprawling Najha cemetery outside Damascus, resting place for thousands of dead from Syria’s wars, is struggling to cope with a surge in victims from the country’s latest conflict — the largely unacknowledged battle with COVID-19.

Official data put the national death toll from the pandemic at 209, but throughout the summer burial notices were posted on city walls and social media almost daily as professional groups mourned lost doctors, academics, lawyers and politicians.

Najha cemetery, the designated site for COVID-19 victims in the Syrian capital, usually handles around 40 burials a day.

That number more than tripled during most of July and there was a spike in August, and the numbers remain well above average, said Abdul Rahim Badir, who issues burial certificates at Najha.

While there are no independent figures for the number of new coronavirus cases and deaths in Syria, Badir’s account chimes with reports from some NGOs and aid workers who say the official data reflect a small fraction of the real toll.

Senior government health officials contacted by Reuters declined to comment on the discrepancies. The Syrian Information Ministry did not respond to an emailed request for comment.

In 30 years of work, Badir said he had never seen such a surge in burials. Some ceremonies have been held at night to avoid bodies piling up.

“We are already digging a mass grave that could bury thousands,” he said.

Syria’s health system, shattered by a nine-year war and lacking equipment to detect the virus, combined with millions of people made vulnerable by impoverishment and displacement, makes it highly susceptible to the pandemic.

Yet it has reported only a fraction of the cases registered by its neighbors, some of them suffering a spike in infections.

The World Health Organization (WHO), which did not challenge government statistics in the early months of the pandemic, said recently that Syria’s limited testing capabilities hid the scale of the crisis — particularly around the capital.

“A lot of cases are still going unreported, and the actual number of COVID-19 cases is much higher ... Damascus and rural Damascus are the hardest hit,” WHO’s Syria representative Akjemal Magtymova told Reuters, citing surveillance data, epidemiological analysis and Health Ministry reports.

A senior coordinator in a major Western NGO, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said there had been a “major and unprecedented spike in July and most of August” to an average of 120 daily deaths, easing to around 60 last month.

Members of the Syria Medical Association took the unusual step in August of going public about losses among their colleagues to COVID-19.

“This is a list of 61 of Syria’s best doctors, who Syria lost in the last few days,” it said in an Aug. 16 Facebook post. Since then there have been at least another 87 confirmed deaths of medical workers, a source in the association said.

Other professions have also suffered. The head of the Syrian Lawyers Union, Al Firas Faris, warned colleagues in a letter on Aug. 9 about a “large spread of the pandemic in state courts and the deaths of a large number of lawyers.”

At the peak of the crisis, medical shortages at Damascus hospitals meant some middle class homes became treatment centers, with private firms delivering oxygen. Hard-pressed health officials appeared on state media to encourage the trend.

Since then UN and NGO support has helped authorities stock up on equipment, easing pressure that prompted some hospitals to ask patients to get their own beds and oxygen canisters to secure a space, two medical sources and an NGO worker said.

But the congested public markets and streets of poorer areas offer the virus the chance to break out again.

“Conditions are all there for it to spread quickly and this is what is happening. Damascus and rural Damascus are the hot spots,” said Matt Hemsley, a Damascus-based Oxfam policy adviser.


Turkish president denies country has a ‘Kurdish issue’

Updated 26 November 2020

Turkish president denies country has a ‘Kurdish issue’

  • Erdogan defended the removal of 59 out of 65 elected Kurdish mayors from their posts
  • Erdogan's lack of sensitivity to the Kurdish issue could inflame tensions with Kurds in Syria and Iraq: analyst

ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan denied the country has a “Kurdish issue,” even as he doubled down on his anti-Kurdish stance and accused a politician of being a “terrorist who has blood on his hands.”

Erdogan was addressing members of his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) on Nov. 25 when he made the remarks.

The Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) launched an insurgency against the state in 1984, and is designated a terrorist group by Turkey, the European Union and US. Erdogan accuses the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) of links to the PKK, which it denies.

Erdogan told AKP members that Selahattin Demirtas, the HDP’s former co-chair who challenged him in the 2015 presidential elections, was a “terrorist who has blood on his hands.”

Demirtas has been behind bars since Nov. 4, 2016, despite court orders calling for his release and faces hundreds of years in prison over charges related to the outlawed PKK.

The president defended the removal of 59 out of 65 elected Kurdish mayors from their posts in the country's Kurdish-majority southeast region since local elections in March 2019.

He also said the AKP would design and implement democratization reforms with its nationalistic coalition partner, which is known for its anti-Kurdish credentials.  

His words are likely to disrupt the peace efforts that Turkey has been making with its Kurdish community for years, although they have been baby steps. They could also hint at a tougher policy shift against Kurds in Syria and Iraq.

According to Oxford University Middle East analyst Samuel Ramani, Erdogan’s comments should be read as a reaction to Tuesday’s resignation of top presidential aide Bulent Arinc, who urged for Demirtas to be released and insisted that the Kurds were repressed within Turkey.

“This gained widespread coverage in the Kurdish media, including in Iraqi Kurdistan's outlet Rudaw which has international viewership,” he told Arab News. “Erdogan wanted to stop speculation on this issue.”

Ramani said that Erdogan's lack of sensitivity to the Kurdish issue could inflame tensions with Kurds in Syria and Iraq.

“It is also an oblique warning to US President-elect Joe Biden not to try to interfere in Turkish politics by raising the treatment of Kurds within Turkey.”

But Erdogan’s comments would matter little in the long run, he added.

“Much more will depend on whether Turkey mounts another Operation Peace Spring-style offensive in northern Syria, which is a growing possibility. If that occurs during the Trump to Biden transition period, the incoming Biden administration could be more critical of Turkey and convert its rhetoric on solidarity with the Kurds into action.”

The Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces have been a key partner for the US in its fight against Daesh. During a campaign speech in Oct. 2019, Biden criticized the US decision to withdraw from Syria as a “complete failure” that would leave Syrian Kurds open to aggression from Turkey.

“It’s more insidious than the betrayal of our brave Kurdish partners, it’s more dangerous than taking the boot off the neck of ISIS,” Biden said at the time.

UK-based analyst Bill Park said that Erdogan was increasingly influenced by his coalition partners, the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP).

“He might also believe that both the PKK and the HDP have been so weakened that he doesn't have to take them into consideration,” he told Arab News. “The Western world will not respond dramatically to this announcement but they are tired of Erdogan. There is little hope that Turkey's relations with the US or the EU can be much improved. The Syrian Kurdish PYD militia are seeking an accommodation with Damascus, while the Kurdistan Democratic Party, the largest party in Iraqi Kurdistan, is indifferent to the fate of Turkey's Kurds and has problems of its own.”

The HDP, meanwhile, is skeptical about Erdogan’s reform pledges and sees them as “politicking.”

“This reform narrative is not sincere,” said HDP lawmaker Meral Danis Bestas, according to a Reuters news agency report. “This is a party which has been in power for 18 years and which has until now totally trampled on the law. It has one aim: To win back the support which has been lost.”

Turkey’s next election is scheduled for 2023, unless there is a snap election in a year.