Sheikh Khalid bin Abdullah Al-Luhaidan, president of the Saudi Supreme Court

Sheikh Khalid bin Abdullah Al-Luhaidan
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Updated 21 October 2020

Sheikh Khalid bin Abdullah Al-Luhaidan, president of the Saudi Supreme Court

Sheikh Khalid bin Abdullah bin Muhammad Al-Luhaidan has been appointed as president of the Saudi Supreme Court.
The Kingdom’s King Salman issued a number of royal decrees earlier this week that ordered a restructuring of the Council of Senior Scholars, the Shoura Council and the Supreme Court.
The decrees included the appointment of Al-Luhaidan as president of the Supreme Court, with the rank of minister.
The royal decrees also appointed 20 people to the Council of Senior Scholars, headed by the Kingdom’s Grand Mufti, Sheikh Abdulaziz bin Abdullah Al-Sheikh.
Within the Shoura Council, 150 members were appointed and will be led by Abdullah bin Mohammed Al-Asheikh.
Al-Luhaidan holds a bachelor’s degree in Shariah from Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University in Riyadh. He also pursued a master’s degree there in the same field. Al-Luhaidan holds a doctoral degree in comparative jurisprudence from the same university.
His experience in court was gained through decades of practice. He served as Judicial Lt. at the Ministry of Justice, Rank 40. He then climbed the judge rankings, from C to A, and became a court attorney.
Al-Luhaidan served as a judge at the Riyadh General Court with the rank of President of Court A. He worked as a judge in the General Directorate of Judicial Inspection with the same rank. Al-Luhaidan also served as appeal judge at the Court of Appeal in the Tabuk region, then was president of a Court of Appeal.
Finally, he served as judge at the Supreme Court with the
rank of appeal judge before his recent appointment.


Saudi Arabia reaffirms support for Afghanistan during donor conference

Updated 54 min 35 sec ago

Saudi Arabia reaffirms support for Afghanistan during donor conference

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has reaffirmed its support for Afghanistan during a pledging conference for the war-torn nation. 
The event, co-hosted by Finland and the United Nations in Geneva, saw the US, the European Union and other donors pledge billions of dollars in funding for Afghanistan.
Abdul Aziz Al-Wasel, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the UN in Geneva, said the Kingdom has supported more than 35 projects in Afghanistan in various sectors, at a cost of more than $24m. 
The projects covered the humanitarian, health, education, water and food security fields. 
Al-Wasel said the Kingdom participated in all donor conferences held for Afghanistan out of its sense of responsibly towards Afghanistan and hopes for the country to achieve security and prosperity. 
He said the Kingdom believes that achieving stability in Afghanistan requires collective support through several steps, including conciliation between the Afghan government and the Taliban, as well as the group’s commitment to renounce violence and engage in the political process. 
Countries like Britain, the Netherlands, Germany, the United States and Canada stepped forward with hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of pledges for Afghanistan, after speeches from officials like Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres.