What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home

What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home
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Updated 24 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home

What We Are Reading Today: Brave New Home

Author: Diana Lind

Diana Lind’s Brave New Home “is one of those invaluable books that offer a new, revelatory window on familiar problems.” said Liza Featherstone in a review for The New York Times.
“Faced with a host of societal challenges — economic inequality, loneliness, housing precarity, environmental degradation — Lind convincingly argues that the single-family home is at least partly to blame,” Featherstone added.
“This cultural obsession, Lind shows, was manufactured by 20th-century policymakers and real estate developers wanting to populate the suburbs, as well as media-fueled — often racist and elitist — panics over the unwholesomeness of cities for families,” said the review.
Featherstone said Lind “rightly contends that the single-family home is an impossible dream for many, fueling inequality.”
The single-family home also “gives its inhabitants far more space than they require, wastefully encouraging them to acquire unnecessary stuff and use far too much energy on heating, cooling and lighting,” said the review.
Featherstone is the author, most recently, of Divining Desire: Focus Groups and the Culture of Consultation.


What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
Updated 25 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

In Blink, Malcolm Gladwell revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant — in the blink of an eye — that actually aren’t as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?

In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple, the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball and the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. 

Blink reveals that great decision-makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of “thin-slicing” — filtering the very
few factors that matter from a number of variables.