What We Are Reading Today: Guardians of Liberty

What We Are Reading Today: Guardians of Liberty
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Updated 31 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Guardians of Liberty

What We Are Reading Today: Guardians of Liberty

Author: Linda Barrett Osborne

Guardians of Liberty explores the essential and basic American ideal of freedom of the press.
Linda Barrett Osborne, formerly of the Library of Congress Publishing Office, puts her cards on the table with the title Guardians of Liberty.
Guardians of Liberty “could not have come at a more critical time in our history. The book dives deep into the history of the freedom of the press and explains clearly why press freedom really matters,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“The book would be a strong addition to any secondary school library. It clearly explains the importance of the press, includes illustrative primary source materials and cites electronic resources (with links that can be accessed if the reader has the digital version),” the review added.
The book is “designed to train future non-journalists to consume the news avidly, responsibly and without fear or favor,” said Marc Tracy in a review for The New York Times.
Osborne is the author of several books for children on African American history, including Abrams’ Traveling the Freedom Road.


What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell
Updated 25 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

What We Are Reading Today: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

In Blink, Malcolm Gladwell revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant — in the blink of an eye — that actually aren’t as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?

In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple, the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball and the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. 

Blink reveals that great decision-makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of “thin-slicing” — filtering the very
few factors that matter from a number of variables.