What We Are Reading Today: Guardians of Liberty

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Updated 31 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Guardians of Liberty

Author: Linda Barrett Osborne

Guardians of Liberty explores the essential and basic American ideal of freedom of the press.
Linda Barrett Osborne, formerly of the Library of Congress Publishing Office, puts her cards on the table with the title Guardians of Liberty.
Guardians of Liberty “could not have come at a more critical time in our history. The book dives deep into the history of the freedom of the press and explains clearly why press freedom really matters,” said a review in goodreads.com.
“The book would be a strong addition to any secondary school library. It clearly explains the importance of the press, includes illustrative primary source materials and cites electronic resources (with links that can be accessed if the reader has the digital version),” the review added.
The book is “designed to train future non-journalists to consume the news avidly, responsibly and without fear or favor,” said Marc Tracy in a review for The New York Times.
Osborne is the author of several books for children on African American history, including Abrams’ Traveling the Freedom Road.


What We Are Reading Today: The Best Writing on Mathematics by Mircea Pitici

Updated 25 November 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Best Writing on Mathematics by Mircea Pitici

This annual anthology brings together the year’s finest mathematics writing from around the world. Featuring promising new voices alongside some of the foremost names in the field, The Best Writing on Mathematics 2020 makes available to a wide audience many articles not easily found anywhere else—and you don’t need to be a mathematician to enjoy them. These writings offer surprising insights into the nature, meaning, and practice of mathematics today. They delve into the history, philosophy, teaching, and everyday aspects of math, and take readers behind the scenes of today’s hottest mathematical debates.

Here, Steven Strogatz reveals how calculus drives advances in virology, Paul Thagard argues that the power of mathematics stems from its combination of realistic and fictional qualities, and Erica Klarreich describes how Hao Huang used the combinatorics of cube nodes to solve a longstanding problem in computer science. In other essays, John Baez tells how he discovered the irresistible attractions of algebraic geometry.