10 things to watch on Tadawul today

10 things to watch on Tadawul today
Here are a few things you need to know as Saudi stocks start trading today, Jan. 18, 2021. (AFP file photo)
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Updated 18 January 2021

10 things to watch on Tadawul today

10 things to watch on Tadawul today
  • Here are a few things you need to know as Saudi stocks start trading

Here are a few things you need to know as Saudi stocks start trading on Monday.

• National Commercial Bank (NCB) announced the intention of NCB Tier 1 Sukuk Ltd., an exempted company with limited liability in the Cayman Islands, to issue US dollar-denominated additional Tier-1 sukuk.

• Emaar The Economic City (Emaar EC) signed a framework cooperation agreement with the Tourism Development Fund, FTG Development Co., Albilad Investment Co. and Ekofine Holding BV to establish a SAR 1.8 billion closed and private investment fund.

• Ataa Educational Co. announced its decision to grant special discounts on tuition fees for the second semester of the academic year 2020/2021.

• Middle East Paper Co. (MEPCO) renewed its Shariah-compliant bank facility agreement with Riyad Bank, at a total value of SAR 101 million.

• MEFIC REIT Fund reported a net loss of SAR 39.2 million for the fiscal year 2020, compared to a net profit of SAR 28 million a year earlier.

• Tadawul announced that Alkhabeer Diversified Income Traded Fund will be listed as a closed-ended investment traded fund on the main market, and units will begin trading on Jan. 19, 2021.

• Saudi Fransi Capital announced the distribution of cash dividend to Taleem REIT Fund unit holders for the period from Oct. 1, 2020 to Dec. 31, 2020, at SAR 0.16 per unit, or 1.6 percent initial price per unit.

• Wafrah for Industry & Development Co. approved the impeachment of the board of directors and audit committee, as applied for by shareholders in possession of 7.14 percent of the total shares of the company.

• The Ministry of Finance’s Projects Support Fund Initiative signed an agreement with Tadawul to provide economic stimulus to listed companies.

• Brent crude on Friday declined $1.32 to reach $55.10 per barrel. WTI crude also decreased $1.21 to reach $52.36/bbl.


Changes in KSA so far just tip of the iceberg, Saudi PIF chief tells the ‘oil man’s Davos’

Changes in KSA so far just tip of the iceberg, Saudi PIF chief tells the ‘oil man’s Davos’
Updated 14 min 6 sec ago

Changes in KSA so far just tip of the iceberg, Saudi PIF chief tells the ‘oil man’s Davos’

Changes in KSA so far just tip of the iceberg, Saudi PIF chief tells the ‘oil man’s Davos’

DUBAI: Changes in Saudi Arabia in the past five years are just the “tip of the iceberg” of the transformation the Kingdom will experience under the Vision 2030 strategy and beyond, Yasir Al-Rumayyan, governor of the Public Investment Fund, said on Tuesday.
“The things we’d like to achieve in 2030 will be our optimal way of starting the next phase, which is what we will do until 2040, or after that to 2050,” Al-Rumayyan told a virtual session of CERAWeek — the “oil man’s Davos” — in Houston, Texas.
“Our society is changing, the people are becoming more receptive to new ideas on how companies should work and how society should function, and even the social contract is changing. If you add all of these together, you will have an idea of what Saudi Arabia, by embracing and implementing Vision 2030, will look like in nine years,” he said.
Al-Rumayyan, who is also chairman of Saudi Aramco, said plans remained in place to sell more shares in the world’s biggest oil company, after the biggest initial public offering (IPO) in history in 2019 when it sold less than 2 percent of its shares.
“From the very beginning we said we would be selling more of the shares owned by the government; once we see market conditions improving, and more appetite from different investment institutions and investors, we will definitely consider selling more shares,” he said.
He also underlined the Kingdom’s ambitions in renewable energy and hydrogen fuels. “Aramco is interested in renewables, believe it or not. It is the largest oil and gas company on the planet, but we are thinking of ourselves as an energy and petrochemical company.”
He told Daniel Yergin, the Pulitzer prize-winning oil historian, that PIF would invest $40 billion a year in Saudi Arabia to “stimulate the economy and
create jobs.”
 


Saudi forum to showcase key projects

Saudi forum to showcase key projects
Updated 36 min 7 sec ago

Saudi forum to showcase key projects

Saudi forum to showcase key projects
  • The Future Projects Forum aims to showcase future projects in the Middle East

Saudi Contractors Authority (SCA) will hold the Future Projects Forum (FPF) virtually during March 22-24.

The FPF will include the participation of more than 37 government and private  entities to present around 1,000 projects with an estimated total value exceeding SR600 billion ($16 billion).

The Future Projects Forum aims to showcase future projects in the Middle East. It also aims to create opportunities for contractors and investors via identifying details of future projects in the contracting sector and knowing the mechanism of qualification and competition.

The forum seeks to develop a wide network of relationships between contractors, investors and interested parties, in addition to creating partnerships between them.

 The number of delivered residential real estate projects increased from SR12.4 billion ($3.3 billion) in 2019 to SR13.9 billion in 2020.


Bahrain expects $3.2bn deficit in 2021, 5% economic growth

Bahrain expects $3.2bn deficit in 2021, 5% economic growth
Updated 03 March 2021

Bahrain expects $3.2bn deficit in 2021, 5% economic growth

Bahrain expects $3.2bn deficit in 2021, 5% economic growth
  • Bahrain’s economy contracted by 5.4% last year, the IMF estimated, as the COVID-19 pandemic hurt vital sectors such as energy and tourism
  • The tiny Gulf state, which based the 2021-2022 budget on an oil price assumption of $50 a barrel, expects the economy to grow 5% this year

DUBAI: Bahrain expects to post a deficit of 1.2 billion dinars ($3.20 billion) in 2021, state news agency BNA said, citing the finance ministry.
The oil-producing Gulf state projected a budget of 3.6 billion dinars for 2021 with revenues expected to amount to 2.4 billion dinars, BNA said.
For next year, total expenditure is estimated at 3.57 billion dinars, against total revenues of 2.46 billion dinars, resulting in a slightly lower deficit of 1.1 billion dinars.
Bahrain’s economy contracted by 5.4% last year, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has estimated, as the COVID-19 pandemic hurt vital sectors such as energy and tourism.
The tiny Gulf state, which based the 2021-2022 budget on an oil price assumption of $50 a barrel, expects the economy to grow 5% this year, BNA said late on Tuesday.
Sovereign wealth fund Mumtalakat will double its contributions to government revenues, said the agency, as Bahrain seeks to boost non-oil revenues.
Bahrain has accumulated a large pile of debt since the 2014-2015 oil price shock. In 2018 it received a $10 billion financial aid program from Gulf allies that helped it avoid a credit crunch.
BNA cited Finance and Economy Minister Sheikh Salman bin Khalifa Al-Khalifa as saying that the country remains committed to achieving the objectives of the fiscal balance program — a set of fiscal reforms linked to the financial aid.
“This budget makes clear Bahrain’s continued commitment to the Fiscal Balance Program, despite the unprecedented challenges of COVID-19, with core government expenditure remaining under tight control,” the minister was quoted as saying.
Public debt rose to 133% of GDP last year from 102% in 2019, the IMF has said, cautioning that the country needs to reduce government debt once economic recovery from the coronavirus crisis firms up.


Theeb Rent-a-Car to list 30% of shares in IPO this month

Theeb Rent-a-Car to list 30% of shares in IPO this month
Updated 03 March 2021

Theeb Rent-a-Car to list 30% of shares in IPO this month

Theeb Rent-a-Car to list 30% of shares in IPO this month

RIYADH: Theeb Rent-a-Car, a Riyadh-based car rental company, plans to float 30 percent of its share capital in an initial public offering (IPO) later this month.

The company issued an IPO prospectus last month to the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul), in which it outlined the many factors that enable it to compete with its current and potential competitors and the factors it sees for its future growth.

The Saudi Capital Market Authority (CMA) last October approved Theeb’s request to offer a 30 percent stake as part of its IPO, representing 12.90 million shares on Tadawul.

The company’s strategy is to continue seeking growth in the car rental services sector by opening new branches, whether at airports, inside cities, or in new mega projects in which the need for car rental is likely to increase.

According to Argaam, Theeb Rent a Car reported a net profit of SR41.9 million ($3.97 million) for the first nine months of 2020, an increase of 8 percent on the same period in 2019.

Short-term leasing accounted for 44.8 percent of revenue, followed by long-term leasing (30.2 percent) and used car sales (25 percent).

Offering daily, weekly and monthly rental services, it operates through 48 outlets across the Kingdom. With 264,131 customers as of March 2020 – a 3 percent year-on-year increase – Theeb has an 8.8 percent share of the short-term car leasing market. It competes with the likes of Al WAFAQ, with a 6.9 percent market share, followed by Budget Saudi (6.9 percent), Arabian Hala (4.6 percent), Key Car Rental (3.5 percent) and SEERA (3.2 percent).
 


Own goal? Shaky finances ruin China’s dream to be a global football power

Jiangsu FC on Sunday said they had
Jiangsu FC on Sunday said they had "ceased operations" — just three months after winning the Chinese Super League. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 02 March 2021

Own goal? Shaky finances ruin China’s dream to be a global football power

Jiangsu FC on Sunday said they had "ceased operations" — just three months after winning the Chinese Super League. (AFP/File Photo)
  • Jiangsu FC on Sunday said they had "ceased operations" — just three months after winning the Chinese Super League

SHANGHAI: Five years ago, China under President Xi Jinping pledged to become a football power by 2050. But the financial collapse of the newly crowned Chinese champions raises fresh questions over that lofty goal.
Jiangsu FC on Sunday said they had "ceased operations" — just three months after winning the Chinese Super League — in a move described as "shocking" by state media.
After rushing in to curry favour with Xi and the Communist Party, burnt investors are retreating again and last year 16 teams pulled out of Chinese football. More are set to follow.
It is a far cry from when the Super League broke the Asian transfer record five times in less than a year, culminating in Chelsea midfielder Oscar joining Shanghai SIPG for 60 million euros in January 2017.
Argentine striker Carlos Tevez was lured by Shanghai Shenhua in the same transfer window on reported wages of 730,000 euros a week, the highest in the world.
But state-run Xinhua news agency said this week that soaring salaries and transfer fees, as clubs vied to outspend each other, had created "a bubble" that is now bursting.
Citing Chinese Football Association statistics, Xinhua said average expenditure in the 2018 season for the Super League's 16 clubs was about 1.1 billion yuan ($170 million), against average income of 686 million yuan.
"The CSL club expenditure is about 10 times higher than South Korea's K League and three times higher than Japan's J-League," CFA president Chen Xuyuan said in December, when salary caps were announced.

Journalist Ma Dexing said that in 30 years covering Chinese football he has seen more than 200 clubs close, indicating a wider problem beyond the current crisis and the coronavirus pandemic, which delayed the Super League for months last year and forced it behind closed doors.
Tianjin Tigers, a Super League mainstay since its founding in 2004, are expected to dissolve within days and Hebei FC's parent company is drowning in debt.
"The fundamental reason is that the foundation of Chinese professional football is too weak," Ma, who has 1.5 million followers on China's Twitter-like Weibo platform, wrote in a column.
Clubs are built and run by companies which have little connection to the communities where they are based, Ma explained.
"Therefore the survival of China's professional clubs directly depends on the economic situation of the enterprise or company," he wrote.
"Once the company or enterprise has problems, the club ceases to exist."
That's what happened to Jiangsu FC, who were until recently called Jiangsu Suning, named after their backers.
The Suning conglomerate, which also owns Serie A leaders Inter Milan, is in financial peril and has cut the team loose.
A recent CFA order for clubs to drop sponsors from their official names -- supposedly to help foster a deeper footballing culture -- was the "last straw" for some investors, the Beijing News said.

Speaking to AFP last year, CFA secretary-general Liu Yi said a healthy Super League was central to China's football ambitions, which include hosting and even winning a World Cup.
Concerned about clubs' high spending and the lack of opportunities for Chinese players, the CFA imposed a 100 percent transfer tax in 2017 on incoming foreigners, plus recent salary and investment caps.
The Shanghai Observer said clubs must abandon single-owner models in favour of multiple stakeholders including "government, enterprises, communities and even individuals".
"Super League clubs cannot only rely on blood transfusions from their parent company but must attract more sponsorship, match-day income (and improve) transfer market operations, etc.," it said in an opinion piece.
Liu told AFP that China remains committed to its ambitious long-term plans, pointing out that foreign stars including Oscar, Paulinho and Marouane Fellaini remain in the Super League.
But the short term is uncertain.
A more frugal Super League is expected to kick off in the spring but with coronavirus concerns persisting, the CFA is yet to announce a start date. Given Jiangsu and Tianjin's problems, it's also unclear which teams will be involved.
Meanwhile, the men's national side has moved up just five places in the FIFA rankings since China revealed its football dreams in 2016. They are now 75th, just above war-ravaged Syria.
China has reached only one World Cup, in 2002, when they failed to score a goal or win a point in their three group games.