What We Are Buying Today: Mariah Flowers

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Updated 11 January 2022

What We Are Buying Today: Mariah Flowers

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  • There are basic rules for arrangements, including following ratio and proportion styles, the gradation of colors and tones, and the rhythm and harmony between the flowers

Mariah Flowers is a Saudi flower business based in Jeddah and owned by Salwa Alwadani, a Saudi kindergarten teacher and floral designer.
The shop offers flower bouquets in many arrangements and styles. Customers can also choose from a range of vases and weekly or monthly subscription services.
Mariah Flowers sells birthday gifts, chocolates and cakes for many occasions.
The shop provides an array of fresh flowers including roses, baby roses, peony, eustoma, alstroemeria, tulips, cherry blossoms, eucalyptus and many other seasonal herbal plants, such as lavender and cotton.
There are basic rules for arrangements, including following ratio and proportion styles, the gradation of colors and tones, and the rhythm and harmony between the flowers.
Alwadani said that she relies on two systems to arrange flowers. The first is a Japanese style called “Najir,” which follows natural formations and uses long vases without the use of any tools or base.
The second is a modern system, which abandons structure and convention in favor of free-flowing, wild arrangements.
Other components are used in this system, such as pieces of wood, stones, dried twigs or anything that comes to the florist’s mind.
For more information, visit the shop’s Instagram page @mariahflowersksa.


US social media star Brittany Xavier shows off Arab accessories label 

US social media star Brittany Xavier shows off Arab accessories label 
Updated 22 January 2022

US social media star Brittany Xavier shows off Arab accessories label 

US social media star Brittany Xavier shows off Arab accessories label 

DUBAI: US YouTuber Brittany Xavier has been spotted wearing a pair of sunglasses from Lebanese influencer Karen Wazen’s eponymous accessories line By Karen Wazen.

The social media star, who has over 1.7 million Instagram followers and more than 4.6 million TikTok supporters, opted for the Ellis shades, a pair of rectangular-frame sunglasses in black. 

The 34-year-old blogger, famous for her fashion, beauty and digital marketing-related blogs, wore a full leather suit, which she paired with a hot purple bag by Spanish luxury fashion house Loewe, as she strolled down the streets of Los Angeles.  

On her YouTube channel, which has around 443,000 subscribers, the full-time content creator documents her life with her husband, Anthony Xavier, and her two daughters, Jadyn and Poppy Xavier. 

She started her career in 2013. “I started my blog as a hobby in hopes of turning this into my full-time career,” she said in one of her YouTube videos. 

The mother recently welcomed her second child, Poppy, whom she gave birth to 14 years after her first girl. 

Meanwhile, Dubai-based entrepreneur and influencer Wazen launched her debut collection of eyewear in December 2018. The first line came in acetate and stainless steel and in an array of colors, from neon to tortoiseshell.

Less than a year after the official launch of her brand, her designs were picked up by major e-tailer Farfetch, which became the first online platform to offer her eyewear collection.

Now with a large collection of stylish shades, the label has gained the nod of approval from international celebrities including British-Albanian singer Dua Lipa, reality television star Kourtney Kardashian, French model Cindy Bruna, and American singer Becky G, along with a number of regional influencers and trendsetters such as Lebanese blogger Nathalie Fanj, Lebanese-Canadian actress Cynthia Samuel, and Iraqi influencer Deema Al-Asadi.

Among her loyal customers is US music sensation Demi Lovato, who championed the designer’s pieces multiple times. 

The two-time Grammy nominee owns Wazen’s Glamorous shades, a pair of cat-eye-shaped sunglasses in green lenses and a clear frame, and a pair of Kennys, which are rectangular-shaped with brown lenses and a transparent frame.


Meet Saudi beauty guru Hessa Alajaji: The face behind Han Makeup

Meet Saudi beauty guru Hessa Alajaji: The face behind Han Makeup
Updated 21 January 2022

Meet Saudi beauty guru Hessa Alajaji: The face behind Han Makeup

Meet Saudi beauty guru Hessa Alajaji: The face behind Han Makeup

DUBAI: Saudi makeup artist Hessa Alajaji’s beauty brand Han Makeup, which she has been working on since 2017, is finally here much to the delight of makeup aficionados. 

“Our goal is to have a brand that covers all the products that anyone would need when doing their makeup,” said the content creator who co-founded the brand in an interview with Arab News. “We have started with makeup brushes as we have noticed a lack of sets that give you the requirements that you need.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HESSA ALAJAJI (@han.alajaji)

Alajaji first gained popularity on social media, where beauty lovers flocked to her Instagram account for creative shots of colorful, otherworldly makeup looks and sneak peaks of the artist’s life. With more than 35,000 followers on Instagram, it was time for the creative talent to translate her know-how into a business.  

The pandemic slowed down the artist’s production plan, but she said it allowed her to test the brushes with several leading makeup artists and users who “all praised the quality” of her set. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HAN (@han.makeup)

Priced at 450 SAR, the set features 10 brushes that will help makeup lovers create knife-sharp eyeliner looks, natural looking eyebrows, and softly blended eyeshadows.

The set, which is made out of natural and synthetic hair, also has larger tools that can be used to contour, highlight, conceal or to apply foundation.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HESSA ALAJAJI (@han.alajaji)

The feedback on her release “exceeded” her expectations. “Clients loved the brush set and we have been receiving amazing feedback. We love that our brushes were a part of the most memorable moments of our clients like their wedding day, engagement party, New Year’s Eve, etc.,” she said.

The Riyadh-based entrepreneur, who has collaborated with international brands like Sephora, is currently working on developing three new products. “We want to venture into cosmetics in 2022 and launch a few products,” she teased. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by HESSA ALAJAJI (@han.alajaji)

As of now, her products are not manufactured in Saudi Arabia, but the beauty guru said she hopes to produce her brand in her home country one day. 

“We secure different samples from factories across the world like Italy, Korea, China, etc., and we proceed with the best quality we get. Quality is the determining factor not location nor the “made in” label,” she added. 

Alajaji said she has always had a passion for arts. “That passion grew with me as I got older and I started discovering makeup when I was in high school. I fell in love with it from the beginning as it allowed me to express my creativity and art,” she said.


A farwa offers a ‘warm embrace’ for Saudis on cold winter nights

A farwa offers a ‘warm embrace’ for Saudis on cold winter nights
Updated 20 January 2022

A farwa offers a ‘warm embrace’ for Saudis on cold winter nights

A farwa offers a ‘warm embrace’ for Saudis on cold winter nights

RIYADH: Winter has well and truly arrived and so the people of Saudi Arabia are adding a layer or two to their outfits to help them cope the colder temperatures.

A particularly popular item found in Saudi winter wardrobes is a traditional Bedouin overcoat known as the farwa, versions of which have for hundreds of years been keeping people in the region warm during long, harsh winter nights in the cold, unforgiving desert.

The long, oversize coat, made from thick, cozy material, is especially common in northern and central parts of the Arabian Peninsula, where temperatures can drop surprisingly low. Its lining is usually made of sheepskin or fur and its cut is similar to that of the traditional Arab cloak known as a bisht.

This new, trendy age of the farwa began with homegrown boutiques and businesses that flourished by putting a modern, stylish spin on a traditional Arab garment. (Hedra)

In the old days the farwa was a garment for men, worn by tribesmen and royalty alike, but the styles, cuts and fur linings varied depending on social class and status.

Nowadays, it is worn by both men and women and is considered by many an essential part of their wardrobes. In the modern era it is also become a fashion item among some Saudis as part of a creative winter ensemble. As a result, the farwa can now be found in myriad modern designs and bright colors, sometimes adorned with cultural patterns and embroidery.

This new, trendy age of the farwa began with homegrown boutiques and businesses that flourished by putting a modern, stylish spin on a traditional Arab garment.

“The farwa is our way of preserving our cultural identity, while offering people something new and exciting, something they can play around with by mixing and matching different clothing items and accessories,” said Manal Al-Harbi, a Saudi entrepreneur and owner of Gabba, a boutique in Riyadh.

She said the farwas sold in her store are all handmade and that most of those on the market these days are made of synthetic materials. The average price is about $370 she added, but some can sell for as much as $2,600.

Gabba, a boutique in Riyadh, sells handmade farwas at its boutique. (Gabba)

“It depends on the materials you use,” said Al-Harbi. “Real fur sourced from animals will be much more expensive, as the process from raw material to final product is lengthy, labor-intensive and very costly.”

Real fur must first undergo extensive treatment to remove the animal’s scent, she explained, then it is dyed and processed further to obtain the soft, inviting texture customers enjoy.

Individual designers and fashion houses put their own spins on the farwa. Al-Harbi, for example, focuses on farwas for women with minimalist designs that can suit any occasion, though she is also happy to accept custom orders.

“Previously women in Saudi would wear jackets over their abayas but nowadays the farwa is the abaya because it looks like it and also serves two purposes: keeping them warm while looking more stylish,” she said.

The trend toward more stylish farwas began about 10 or 12 years ago and picked up pace in the past few years, according to Al-Harbi. Almost every household in the Kingdom’s central and northern cities will own a few to wear during the cold season, she said.

Jeddah-born Hussain Abedi, 25, told Arab News that he thought he was done with chilly weather when he returned to Saudi Arabia after living in the UK. But after moving to Riyadh and experiencing its cold winters, he realized he had some shopping to do.

“I go farwa hunting with my friends, sometimes,” he said. “It’s just something I enjoy wearing and buying different designs of. It can be difficult to settle on a color or specific design pattern but, overall, wearing a farwa feels like a warm embrace.”

They also make good gifts, Abedi added, and can make a fashion statement among friends, especially when the farwa is made with real fur.


British entrepreneur Dr. Tara Lalvani reveals how her game-changing beauty tool came to be

British entrepreneur Dr. Tara Lalvani reveals how her game-changing beauty tool came to be
Updated 19 January 2022

British entrepreneur Dr. Tara Lalvani reveals how her game-changing beauty tool came to be

British entrepreneur Dr. Tara Lalvani reveals how her game-changing beauty tool came to be

DUBAI: If you can’t find it, make it! So goes the philosophy behind many brands, including Beautifect. The new beauty line based in London is known for its revolutionary Beautifect box, a tech-enabled device for applying, storing and carrying makeup.

The idea behind the Beautifect box came to British founder Dr. Tara Lalvani four and a half years ago while on the plane. “I was on my way to Dubai, and I just got the kids to finally sleep. I was thinking about the day ahead, about the hotel, about how poor the lighting was going to be and how I would get ready while managing my kids, and that’s when the idea of Beautifect occurred to me,” she told Arab News.

The Beautifect Box is a chargable beauty device for applying, carrying and storing makeup. 

A dental surgeon, Dr. Lalvani had no plans to launch her own business. In fact, before she had the idea to create the Beautifect box, she had her mind set on purchasing a product that could serve as a portable dressing table when she realized such a thing didn’t exist. “How could something so obvious not be already out there?” she proclaimed.

“Before I even landed, I decided that if it was out there, I was going to buy it. If it wasn’t, then I was going to create it because it would help every woman in the same position. I couldn’t believe that in this day and age, we were still struggling to get the right lighting and still being tied down to one place. And that’s really when the whole idea was born,” she explained.

What makes the product so special is the lighting, which took Dr. Lalvani over two years to perfect. The Beautifect box features five different lighting options that simulate different lighting environments so women can do their makeup more accurately. “Lighting completely changes the look of your makeup. There is no better lighting for makeup on the market than the Beautifect light,” shared the entrepreneur.

The portable device bills itself as the beauty equivalent to a laptop. 

The beauty equivalent of a laptop, the added benefit of the chargeable Beautifect box is that it allows women to do their makeup anywhere, whether they are in the back of an Uber on their way to a meeting or lounging on the sofa before dinner plans. A single charge lasts up to a month, and in an age when women are busier than ever, juggling careers and motherhood, the Beautifect box is quite revolutionary.

“We have such busy lives now. How can we still be doing our makeup the same way we’ve been doing it for generations? With Beautifect, you can do it on your schedule. You no longer have to sit at a dressing table in a separate room for something that you do every day,” shared Dr. Lalvani.

After launching Beautifect, the entrepreneur realized that dentistry was never really her passion. “All my life, I’ve always been a massive beauty lover, but after training for six years to be a dentist and practicing for over a decade in London, I didn’t imagine I would do anything else,” she recalled. Her profession as a dentist, however, did heavily inform the creative process of her brand. “After I launched, a friend of mine pointed out that the way I designed the storage in the Beautifect box reminded them of a dental tray,” she mused.

The chargeable Beautifect box is that it allows women to do their makeup anywhere.

Despite launching in the middle of a global pandemic, Beautifect was an instant hit when it landed on shelves at Harrods and online on Ounass and Dr. Lalvani’s own website. The entrepreneur attributes some of the success to the rise of social media platforms like TikTok during the pandemic. “We live in a time in which makeup isn’t necessarily just for going out. I designed the product around the social media age. We need to be able to film content, take selfies,” explained Dr. Lalvani.

Today, the Beautifect line boasts a beauty blender, Mulberry silk eye mask, crystal nail file, vanity bag and tote.

With an oversaturation of eyeshadow palettes, foundations and lipsticks on the market, Dr. Lalvani reveals she wants to focus her brand on beauty tools and devices. “Cosmetic brands are focused on makeup and when it comes to tools, they’re almost an afterthought,” she shared. “Our focus is on creating the best tools in their categories.”

You can shop the products on Beautifect.com. 


The top interior design trends of 2022 revealed

The top interior design trends of 2022 revealed
Updated 19 January 2022

The top interior design trends of 2022 revealed

The top interior design trends of 2022 revealed

DUBAI: A fresh year could prompt you to hit the refresh button on your living space. To give your interiors a facelift that mirrors your personal style, Saudi Arabia-based interiors brand Aura Living has shared the top design trends for 2022.

Comfortable rooms, flexible spaces

As we spend more time at home, we are moving away from rigid structures and formal living spaces and seeing a more open approach toward spaces that are welcoming and adaptive. Lounge areas and family rooms have become an individual’s main priority. But that doesn’t mean what is functional can’t be aesthetically chic — the key is to create the perfect balance between elegance and practicality. Take the Morzine sofa from Aura’s Fall 2021 line for instance. With practicality in mind, this modular sofa is designed to offer flexibility to design layouts, making a space equal parts comfy and elegant.

Morzine Sectional Sofa. Supplied

Vibrant hues

Paint trends will fall into two distinct camps this year: Earthy, organic shades and vibrant, energizing hues, which were popular in the 1950s. However, that does not necessarily mean that you need to invade your house with painterly pops. Rather, add vibrant shades of color where you feel suitable. Start with a neutral color palette as this will help you incorporate color easily and switch it up from time to time.

Supplied

Curves

Sculptural furnishing and feminine shapes are rapidly finding their way into sanctuaries this season. From curved sofas, to dining chairs, beds and cabinets, the options are endless. Arches, angled edges and wavy design accessories are all present within Aura’s Fall 2021 collection. You can opt for side chairs or single-seated sofas such as Aura’s Lezoux chair in soft pink, or the Joy chair in cobalt blue.

Supplied

Texture

Even the most basic neutral palettes can feel layered and exceptional when lots of different textures are incorporated. In the coming year, mastering that mix is going to be paramount. The easiest way to add texture into your decor is through fabrics and textiles. Start with smaller items, such as cushions, rugs and throws, that can be easily moved around or replaced should you want a quick interior update in the future.