Prince Mohammed Bin Salman City selects solutions by stc to implement Smart City strategy

The smart city strategy includes mobility, sustainability and security verticals, and a digital twin that integrates advanced technologies to create dynamic digital models to visualize the city in real-time. 
The smart city strategy includes mobility, sustainability and security verticals, and a digital twin that integrates advanced technologies to create dynamic digital models to visualize the city in real-time. 
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Updated 16 May 2022

Prince Mohammed Bin Salman City selects solutions by stc to implement Smart City strategy

Prince Mohammed Bin Salman City selects solutions by stc to implement Smart City strategy

RIYADH: Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Nonprofit City has appointed solutions by stc to implement its smart city strategy, according to a statement. 

The smart city strategy includes mobility, sustainability and security verticals, and a digital twin that integrates advanced technologies to create dynamic digital models to visualize the city in real-time. 

“Our ambition is to develop a digital twin smart city aligned with the goals of Vision 2030 to leverage digital opportunities and drive transformational growth for all enterprises in the city,” CEO David Henry said. 

“It will represent a living lab and an innovative community where young minds can nurture their ideas and drive the growth of their enterprises,” he added. 

A modular data center and a flagship integrated command and control center will be established by 2023 and 2024 respectively, the statement said. 

Located in the Irqah neighborhood, Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Nonprofit City serve as a model for the development of the nonprofit sector globally and an incubator for youth and volunteer groups, as well as local and international nonprofit institutions.

 


Migrant trafficking network in Europe smashed

Migrant trafficking network in Europe smashed
Updated 4 min 46 sec ago

Migrant trafficking network in Europe smashed

Migrant trafficking network in Europe smashed

LONDON: A 26-year-old Iranian-Kurdish people trafficker and 38 members of his gang were behind bars on Wednesday after police in five European countries smashed a major cross-border network that smuggled migrants into the UK.

The gang leader was arrested in Britain along with five other people smugglers. Germany arrested 18 gang members, French police nine and Dutch police six.
Police also seized more than 1,200 life-jackets, about 150 rubber boats and 50 engines, and tens of thousands of euros in cash, firearms and drugs.

The EU law enforcement agency Europol said the trafficking network could have smuggled as many as 10,000 illegal migrants to Britain over the past year and a half and netted as much as €15 million. Police officials said the gang was one of the most active criminal networks smuggling people from France and Belgium to Britain in small boats.
“This is the most significant operation ever mounted against smuggling operations across the English Channel, especially with this phenomenon of small boats,” Europol deputy executive director Jean-Philippe Lecouffe said.
More than 28,500 people arrived in England illegally last year, mostly from the Middle East, North Africa and Afghanistan, after making the dangerous cross-Channel journey in often flimsy and dangerous vessels.

“Given the number of boats we seized yesterday ... we can expect a fall in the number of crossings in the immediate future,” Matt Rivers of the UK National Crime Agency said.
The British government hopes to start sending some of the illegal migrants to Rwanda but that plan — widely criticised in the UK and internationally — is being held up by legal challenges.


Sudan protesters take to the barricades again

Sudan protesters take to the barricades again
Updated 34 min 24 sec ago

Sudan protesters take to the barricades again

Sudan protesters take to the barricades again

JEDDAH: Protesters in Sudan took to makeshift street barricades of rocks and tires for a seventh day on Wednesday as military leader Abdel Fattah Al-Burhan fired the last civilian members of the country’s ruling council.

Burhan, who seized power in a coup last October, has vowed to “make room” for civilian groups to form a new transitional government after he disbanded the ruling Sovereign Council, which he chairs. The council’s members said they had received no formal notification and were surprised to discover that their official vehicles had been taken away.

Protesters have demanded a restoration of the transition to civilian rule despite repeated crackdowns by the security forces, who have in recent days fired live bullets, launched barrages of tear gas canisters and deployed water cannons. At least 114 people have been killed in the crackdown since October.

The transitional government uprooted by Burhan last year had been forged between the military and civilian factions in 2019, following mass protests that prompted the army to oust dictator Omar Bashir.

Sudan’s main civilian alliance, the Forces for Freedom and Change, said Burhan’s latest move was a “giant ruse” and “tactical retreat.” They also called for “continued public pressure,” and protesters returned to the streets of Khartoum on Wednesday.

Democracy campaigners say the army chief has made such moves before. In November, a month after the coup, Burhan signed a deal with Abdalla Hamdok, the prime minister he had ousted in the power grab and put under house arrest, returning him to power.

But many people rejected that pact and took to the streets again, and Hamdok resigned in January warning that Sudan was “crossing a dangerous turning point that threatens its whole survival.”


Egg producers in Turkey scramble to defend price rises amid inflation crisis

Egg producers in Turkey scramble to defend price rises amid inflation crisis
Updated 37 min 57 sec ago

Egg producers in Turkey scramble to defend price rises amid inflation crisis

Egg producers in Turkey scramble to defend price rises amid inflation crisis
  • Producers in the country reject allegations of price fixing and profiteering and say they have no choice but to raise prices as imports grow more expensive
  • Anti-trust watchdogs have stepped up investigations of retailers and producers, resulting in some of the country’s largest chain stores facing record fines for alleged price gouging

LONDON: Egg producers in Turkey have found themselves at the center of a growing debate over who is to blame for the country’s inflation crisis, as the government increases the pressure on businesses to keep prices down.

The nation’s anti-trust watchdog has stepped up its investigations and on-site inspections of retailers and producers since President Recep Tayyip Erdogan pushed back in September against businesses accused of profiteering. As a result, record fines have been imposed on some of the country’s largest chain stores for alleged price gouging. They deny any wrongdoing and are appealing against the punishments in court.

Meanwhile, the Competition Authority has warned that it expects to impose further fines after another investigation concluded that major retailers were conspiring with suppliers to raise prices. Last month, the watchdog announced it was investigating whether Turkey’s Egg Producers Association and its 29 members had abused market data to fix prices.

Surging food prices in Turkey are a key driver of soaring inflation, which approached an annual rate of 80 percent in June. The cost of food and non-alcoholic beverages last month had almost doubled compared with a year ago.

The country’s egg producers said they have no choice but to raise prices because imports have become more expensive as a result of soaring global inflation and the declining value of the lira. While egg prices have risen dramatically in the past year, they fell by more than 4 percent in June, compared with the previous month, as pressure mounted on the producers.

According to the US Department of Agriculture, Turkey produced approximately 20 billion eggs in 2019 but increases in feed costs meant output was already stagnant even before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine upended global grain markets. Farmers who import hatching eggs and day-old chicks have seen their costs rise as well.

“We have had numerous meetings with the inspectors from ministries before and those officials confirmed our price hikes were based on the changing cost of raw materials,” said Ibrahim Afyon, the head of the Turkish Egg Producers Association.

“Producers have been under stress because of verbal guidance by officials on keeping prices down in an economy where costs are rising rapidly, but we don’t believe we have done anything wrong.”

The government has stepped up the pressure on businesses since the country’s central bank began a round of monetary easing in the fourth quarter of 2021 that pummeled the lira, triggered outflows and fueled inflation.

Erdogan, who holds the unconventional economic view that high interest rates exacerbate inflation, has resisted growing pressure to raise the cost of borrowing, instead blaming rapid price increases on the private sector.

“Not all the price hikes can be explained by costs, demand and the fluctuations in world commodity markets,” Birol Kule, the head of Turkey’s Competition Authority, said last week.

“The lack of competition in some fields has an enhancing effect on inflation; it has a considerable influence on prices in Turkey.”


What We Are Reading Today: The Divorce Colony

What We Are Reading Today: The Divorce Colony
Updated 55 min 34 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: The Divorce Colony

What We Are Reading Today: The Divorce Colony

Author: April White 

In The Divorce Colony, writer and historian April White unveils the incredible social, political, and personal dramas that unfolded in Sioux Falls and reverberated around the country through the stories of four very different women.

Entertaining, enlightening, and utterly feminist, The Divorce Colony is a rich, deeply researched tapestry of social history and human drama that reads like a novel.

Amidst salacious newspaper headlines, juicy court documents, and high-profile cameos from the era’s most well-known players, this story lays bare the journey of the turn-of-the-century socialites who took their lives into their own hands and reshaped the country’s attitudes about marriage and divorce.


Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia

Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia
Updated 58 min 16 sec ago

Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia

Russia’s Lavrov to join G20 foreign ministers’ meeting in Indonesia
  • The G20 includes Western countries that have accused Russia of war crimes in Ukraine, but also nations such as China, India, and South Africa that have remained neutral

JAKARTA: Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov will this week attend a meeting in Bali with his counterparts from the Group of 20 largest economies, officials confirmed on Wednesday, as host Indonesia tries to mediate rifts in the bloc over Moscow’s participation.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, one of the world’s breadbaskets, has delivered shockwaves to global supply chains and also stoked an energy crisis following international sanctions slapped on Moscow — a major oil and gas producer — which has also led to rising inflation in many countries.

The G20 includes Western countries that have accused Russia of war crimes in Ukraine, but also nations such as China, India, and South Africa that have remained neutral. The gathering will be the first time that foreign ministers of some of the world’s top economies have met Lavrov since the beginning of the invasion in late February.

Indonesia, which this year holds the rotating G20 presidency and has been facing pressure to exclude Russia from the summit scheduled to take place in November, is expecting a full attendance during the ministerial meeting on Friday.

“All G20 foreign ministers will be present in Bali,” Teuku Faizasyah, spokesperson for the Indonesian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, told Arab News.

Lavrov’s attendance was further confirmed by Denis Tetiushin, a spokesperson of the Russian Embassy in Jakarta, who told Arab News that the “agenda is the same for all the delegations,” including Russia’s.

Friday’s meeting comes after Indonesian President Joko Widodo’s trip last week to Kyiv and Moscow to meet Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and Russian President Vladimir Putin — both of whom have been invited to the November summit.

The G20 foreign ministers are expected to discuss ways to strengthen global collaboration and overcome the food crisis and global rise of commodity prices.

“With the new situation in Ukraine, issues related to food security will also be widely discussed at the G20 meetings,” the Indonesian Foreign Ministry said in a statement. “This meeting will serve as a strategic forum to discuss global recovery efforts.”

Indonesia has also invited non-member countries to attend this week’s meeting, including Ukraine. The Ukrainian ambassador in Jakarta, Vasyl Hamianin, told Arab News that Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba will join the meeting virtually and that the eastern European nation sees its participation “positively.”

He said: “The global agenda at present is closely related to what happens in Ukraine.”

In a G20 finance meeting in Washington in April, top officials from the UK, Canada, and the US walked out on Russian representatives. The reaction to Lavrov in Bali may provide an indication of how the bloc’s members will respond if Putin attends in person the summit in Bali later this year, which has not been confirmed.

On Lavrov’s attendance at the ministerial meetings, Hamianin said: “War criminals and officials representing terrorist states must not be allowed to appear at any authoritative and respected international fora.” He added that Lavrov was the minister of the state that was, “committing massive crimes against humanity in Ukraine.”