5 dead, 14 injured in Amman building collapse

5 dead, 14 injured in Amman building collapse
Rescuers work at the site of a four-storey residential building collapse in Amman, Jordan September 13, 2022. (Reuters)
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Updated 13 September 2022

5 dead, 14 injured in Amman building collapse

5 dead, 14 injured in Amman building collapse
  • Major rescue operation carried out to evacuate people caught under debris
  • Residents lodged complaints with Amman’s municipality about increased construction work in area

AMMAN: Five people were killed and 14 others were reportedly injured when a four-story residential building collapsed in Jordan’s capital Amman.

The Public Security Department said eight people were pulled from the rubble in the El-Luweibdeh area.

However, witnesses said many more were in the structure at the time of the collapse. Rescue operations were still under way.

Officials attributed the collapse to poor foundations and weak supporting structures. However, residents told Arab News that they believed work on a new adjacent building had contributed to the failure. 

The residents said they had lodged complaints with Amman’s municipality about increased construction work in the area, known for buildings dating back to the 1940s, which had destabilized foundations and caused cracks in their own properties. 

“Real estate tycoons are building large residential buildings for foreign expatriates without paying attention to the fact that the neighboring houses are very old and very fragile,” one resident said. “I really don’t know how they get the construction permits.”

El-Luweibdeh is a preferred neighborhood for foreign expatriates in Jordan.

Prime Minister Bishr Khadawneh visited the site of the collapse and ordered an investigation.


Ambassador of Italy to UAE: Cultural diplomacy should be ‘instrument to connect Italy, Gulf countries’  

Ambassador of Italy to UAE: Cultural diplomacy should be ‘instrument to connect Italy, Gulf countries’  
Updated 9 sec ago

Ambassador of Italy to UAE: Cultural diplomacy should be ‘instrument to connect Italy, Gulf countries’  

Ambassador of Italy to UAE: Cultural diplomacy should be ‘instrument to connect Italy, Gulf countries’  
  • Italian envoy’s remarks came on the sidelines of Arab News’ General Assembly 
  • Series of initiatives by Italian Embassy in Abu Dhabi set to launch in coming months in UAE 

DUBAI: Cultural diplomacy should be “a key factor” to improve the “already excellent relationship between Italy, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf region countries,” said Ambassador of Italy to the UAE Lorenzo Fanara during his meeting in Dubai on Sunday with Arab News Editor-in-Chief Faisal Abbas. 

The meeting took place on the sidelines of the 2022 General Assembly of Arab News, which was also attended by the newspaper’s Assistant Editor-in-Chief Noor Nugali and its Italy correspondent Francesco Bongarra.

Abbas explained to the Italian envoy the reach and role of Arab News as the “voice of a changing region.” 

Fanara, who was appointed ambassador of Italy to the UAE after serving as an ambassador also in Tunis, stressed the importance of “cultural diplomacy” as an “instrument to connect the common history and heritage linking Italy and the Gulf countries. 

“A long-standing relationship cannot be based only on business,” the envoy said, after presenting a series of cultural initiatives the Italian Embassy in Abu Dhabi plans to organize in the next months both in the UAE capital city and Dubai. 

“Our histories and cultures are interconnected; we belong to the same cultural community. This is why we have to do our best to know each other’s heritage and enhance what unites us,” Fanara added.


Yemen foreign minister meets Italian counterpart

Yemen foreign minister meets Italian counterpart
Updated 04 December 2022

Yemen foreign minister meets Italian counterpart

Yemen foreign minister meets Italian counterpart

Minister of Foreign Affairs Ahmed bin Mubarak, met on Sunday with the Italian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs, Antonio Tijani, and discussed the political, security and humanitarian situation in Yemen.

Tijani affirmed Italy's support for efforts being made to resume negotiations to reach a peaceful resolution and end the conflict, stressing the importance of renewing and extending the armistice.

Mubarak thanked the Italian government for its firm and continuous political support of the Yemen’s internationally recognised government in its endeavor to establish peace, restore state institutions and end the Houthi coup, state news agency SABA reported.

Mubarak touched on the repeated Houthi attacks civilians, civilian infrastructure, and oil installations.

Mubarak also discussed his government’s decision to classify the Houthi militia as a terrorist organization, and called for support from the international community to implement that decision.

Mubarak spoke about the Houthi militia ties with the Iranian Revolutionary Guards and Lebanon’s Hezbollah, and their smuggling of Iranian weapons and drones.


Former British Daesh bride ‘will die without medical aid’ in Syrian camp, neurologist warns

Former British Daesh bride ‘will die without medical aid’ in Syrian camp, neurologist warns
Updated 04 December 2022

Former British Daesh bride ‘will die without medical aid’ in Syrian camp, neurologist warns

Former British Daesh bride ‘will die without medical aid’ in Syrian camp, neurologist warns
  • UK government inaction in Layla case amounts to ‘barbarism,’ says Dr. David Nicholl

LONDON: A former British Daesh bride detained in a prison camp in northeast Syria will die without medical intervention, with the UK government’s inaction amounting to “barbarism,” a neurologist told The Times.

The woman in her 40s, who is known by the pseudonym Layla, first traveled to Syria to join Daesh during the country’s conflict.

Following the collapse of the terror group and detainment of thousands of former fighters and their families, Layla — who is epileptic and partially paralyzed as a result of a shrapnel wound — has repeatedly appealed for medical aid through National Health Service consultant neurologist Dr. David Nicholl.

But despite his repeated warnings to the government that Layla will die without urgent medical aid, the government has yet to respond.

He first examined her via an online meeting late last year. Following another Zoom video call in November, Nicholl found that Layla’s condition had significantly worsened, with shrapnel in her neck having moved dangerously close to the aorta.

He said: “She’s ill and at risk of dying and needs to be got out of there and brought back immediately. It’s utterly inhumane.”

Layla, who has a university degree and held a high-level public sector job in the UK before traveling to Syria with her husband, suffered a stroke in 2019. “She has had life-changing neurological injuries as a consequence of her stroke,” Nicholl added.

“She does not speak Arabic so it is hard for her to understand the medical advice she is being given.

“It troubles me that my previous assessment has still not been acted on, the case for her urgent transfer still remains.

“Everything about this is a mess. Her son is also vulnerable and watching all this and is in a place where no child should be.”

Layla spoke to the Sunday Times in June, claiming: “I was never a threat.” She added: “Whatever people think I have done I am prepared to face trial. I made a mistake, why should my son pay?

“Life in the camp is really, really hard. It’s hard to walk on the stones with my crutches. I am embarrassed to have to ask for help for everything, and the tent is so hot and when it’s windy the whole tent moves.”

Human rights group Reprieve has also appealed to the UK government to act urgently and rescue Layla.

The organization sent a letter to Foreign Secretary James Cleverly that said: “Her condition has become critical and a local doctor told her that without urgent surgery, she will die. She requires immediate medical assistance that cannot be provided in northeast Syria.”

In response to the appeals, Cleverly told The Times: “I am not comfortable going into specific cases. They are difficult, they are sensitive, we do always look at the cases.”


Iran scraps morality police after months of deadly protests

Iran scraps morality police after months of deadly protests
Updated 04 December 2022

Iran scraps morality police after months of deadly protests

Iran scraps morality police after months of deadly protests
  • The morality police — known formally as the Gasht-e Ershad or “Guidance Patrol” — were established under hard-line president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

TEHRAN: Iran has scrapped its morality police after more than two months of protests triggered by the arrest of Mahsa Amini for allegedly violating the country’s strict female dress code, local media said Sunday.
Women-led protests, labelled “riots” by the authorities, have swept Iran since the 22-year-old Iranian of Kurdish origin died on September 16, three days after her arrest by the morality police in Tehran.
“Morality police have nothing to do with the judiciary” and have been abolished, Attorney General Mohammad Jafar Montazeri was quoted as saying by the ISNA news agency.
His comment came at a religious conference where he responded to a participant who asked “why the morality police were being shut down,” the report said.
The morality police — known formally as the Gasht-e Ershad or “Guidance Patrol” — were established under hard-line president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, to “spread the culture of modesty and hijab,” the mandatory female head covering.
The units began patrols in 2006.
The announcement of their abolition came a day after Montazeri said that “both parliament and the judiciary are working (on the issue)” of whether the law requiring women to cover their heads needs to be changed.
President Ebrahim Raisi said in televised comments Saturday that Iran’s republican and Islamic foundations were constitutionally entrenched “but there are methods of implementing the constitution that can be flexible.”
The hijab became mandatory four years after the 1979 revolution that overthrew the US-backed monarchy and established the Islamic Republic of Iran.
Morality police officers initially issued warnings before starting to crack down and arrest women 15 years ago.
The vice squads were usually made up of men in green uniforms and women clad in black chadors, garments that cover their heads and upper bodies.
The role of the units evolved, but has always been controversial even among candidates running for the presidency.
Clothing norms gradually changed, especially under former moderate president Hassan Rouhani, when it became commonplace to see women in tight jeans with loose, colorful headscarves.
But in July this year his successor, the ultra-conservative Raisi, called for the mobilization of “all state institutions to enforce the headscarf law.”
Raisi at the time charged that “the enemies of Iran and Islam have targeted the cultural and religious values of society by spreading corruption.”
In spite of this, many women continued to bend the rules, letting their headscarves slip onto their shoulders or wearing tight-fitting pants, especially in major cities and towns.
Iran’s regional rival Saudi Arabia also employed morality police to enforce female dress codes and other rules of behavior. Since 2016 the force there has been sidelined in a push by the Sunni Muslim kingdom to shake off its austere image.


State news: Iran executes 4 people it says spied for Israel

State news: Iran executes 4 people it says spied for Israel
Updated 04 December 2022

State news: Iran executes 4 people it says spied for Israel

State news: Iran executes 4 people it says spied for Israel
  • Executed prisoners identified as Hossein Ordoukhanzadeh, Shahin Imani Mahmoudabadi, Milad Ashrafi and Manouchehr Shahbandi

TEHRAN: Iranian authorities executed four people Sunday accused of working for Israel’s Mossad intelligence agency, the state-run IRNA news agency said.
IRNA said the country’s powerful Revolutionary Guard announced the arrests of a network of people linked to the Israeli agency. It said members stole and destroyed private and public property and kidnapped individuals and interrogated them.
The report said the alleged spies had weapons and received wages from Mossad in the form of cryptocurrency.
Israel and Iran are regional arch-enemies.
IRNA identified the executed prisoners as Hossein Ordoukhanzadeh, Shahin Imani Mahmoudabadi, Milad Ashrafi and Manouchehr Shahbandi.