Rihanna as Egypt’s Queen Nefertiti? Vogue Arabia thinks so

Updated 29 October 2017

Rihanna as Egypt’s Queen Nefertiti? Vogue Arabia thinks so

JEDDAH: Vogue Arabia is facing fresh backlash on social media over its latest cover.
The magazine has yet again been accused of cultural appropriation as it released its November cover featuring Barbadian singer Rihanna dressed as Egypt’s Queen Nefertiti, with some claiming that Vogue Arabia perpetuated the notion that black and African people are interchangeable.
“Um cultural appropriation by someone from Barbados ... aren’t White people mostly accused of doing this ... nice to see someone else doing it,” wrote @ChefSJ
Another user, Marie Rocha (@MyDailyPosts) tweeted: “I love Rihanna, but I’ve met some stunning Egyptians that could have paid homage to Queen Nefertiti.”
Queen Nefertiti was one of the most powerful women in ancient Egypt almost 3,500 years ago. She was renowned for her beauty and is believed to have brought radical change to Egypt along with her husband Pharaoh Akhenaten.
“We are dedicating the issue to strong and dynamic women who are changing the world,” Vogue Arabia Editor-in-Chief Manuel Arnaut wrote in the editor’s letter. “Rihanna, our cover star, is one of them. Not only is she one of the most successful pop icons ever, shaping the entertainment industry with her powerful tunes and unique sense of style, she is also an advocate for diversity.”
The star appears on the cover wearing Gucci paired with a custom Faeth Millinery-designed headpiece in a stylish homage to Queen Nefertiti.
The pop star has an adoration for the Egyptian queen, and has her iconic bust tattooed on her ribcage.
So far, neither Vogue Arabia nor Rihanna has responded to the controversy.
Earlier, Gigi and Bella Hadid saw similar backlash for posing for Vogue Arabia.


Taj Mahal damaged in deadly India thunderstorm

Updated 31 May 2020

Taj Mahal damaged in deadly India thunderstorm

  • India’s top tourist attraction has been shut since mid-March as part of measures to try and combat the coronavirus pandemic

AGRA, India: A deadly thunderstorm that rolled across parts of northern India damaged sections of the Taj Mahal complex, including the main gate and a railing running below its five lofty domes, officials said Sunday.
One of the New Seven Wonders of the World, India’s top tourist attraction has been shut since mid-March as part of measures to try and combat the coronavirus pandemic.
AFP images showed workers assessing the railing of the main mausoleum, after the storm on Friday night battered Agra city in northern Uttar Pradesh state.
“One sandstone railing which was a part of the original structure has been damaged,” Superintending Archaeologist of the Archaeological Survey of India, Vasant Kumar Swarnkar, said.
“One marble railing which was a later addition, a false ceiling in the tourist holding area and the base stone of the main gate has also been damaged.”
He added there was no damage to the main structure of the monument to love — built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan as a tomb for his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth in 1631.
Local media reports said thunderstorms and lightning on Friday killed at least 13 people in two Uttar Pradesh districts.
Fatal lightning strikes are relatively common during the June-October monsoon season.
Last year, at least 150 people were killed by lightning in August and September in Madhya Pradesh state in central India.