Morocco says it nabbed fugitive Italian mobster

Raffaele Vallefuoco, 55, is accused of heading a cell within the Polverino clan of the ruthless Naples-based Camorra organized crime group. (Social media)
Updated 30 May 2019

Morocco says it nabbed fugitive Italian mobster

RABAT: An Italian mafia fugitive wanted for drug trafficking, murder, extortion and other alleged crimes has been arrested in Morocco, authorities in the North African country said Thursday.
Raffaele Vallefuoco, 55, is accused of heading a cell within the Polverino clan of the ruthless Naples-based Camorra organized crime group, the General Directorate of National Security said in a statement.
He was detained in Tangiers on Wednesday under an Italian arrest warrant, with help from Interpol, it said.
Another Italian accused of links to the Camorra, 44-year-old Antonio Prinno, was arrested in late March in Marrakesh and is being detained pending extradition, a police source said.
The Camorra is one of Italy’s three main mafia groups, along with Sicily’s Cosa Nostra and the ‘Ndrangheta, based mainly in the Calabria region.
Morocco is one of the world’s top producers and exporters of hashish, according to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime.


Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

Updated 19 October 2019

Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

  • EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities as demanded by the US is not a genuine cease-fire
  • He calls on Ankara to immediately stop military operations,

BRUSSELS/ANKARA: Macron critizes Turkey's aggression in Syria as "madness', bewails NATO inaction

France’s President Emmanuel Macron has bemoaned Turkey’s offensive into northern Syria as “madness” and decried NATO’s inability to react to the assault as a “serious mistake.”

“It weakens our credibility in finding partners on the ground who will be by our side and who think they will be protected in the long term. So that raises questions about how NATO functions.”

EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities is not a genuine cease-fire and called on Ankara to immediately stop military operations in Syria.

Dareen Khalifa, a senior Syria analyst at the International Crisis Group, said the cease-fire had unclear goals. 

There was no mention of the scope of the area that would be under Turkish control and, despite US Vice President Mike Pence referring to a 20-mile zone, the length of the zone remains ambiguous, she said.

Selim Sazak, a doctoral researcher at Brown University, believed the agreement would be implemented and the YPG would withdraw.

“The agency of the YPG is fairly limited. If the deal collapses because of the YPG, it’s actually all the better for Ankara,” he told Arab News. “What Ankara originally wanted was to take all of the belt into its control and eliminate as many of the YPG forces as possible. Instead, the YPG is withdrawing with a portion of its forces and its territory intact. Had the deal collapsed because of the YPG, Ankara would have reason to push forward, this time with much more legitimacy.”