In first for Italy, woman to head constitutional court

In first for Italy, woman to head constitutional court
Marta Cartabia speaks after being elected president of Italy's Constitutional Court, in Rome, Dec. 11, 2019. (AP)
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Updated 11 December 2019

In first for Italy, woman to head constitutional court

In first for Italy, woman to head constitutional court
  • Cartabia was elected by the 15 judges sitting at the court
  • She is one of the youngest ever presidents elected to the court

ROME: Judge and law professor Marta Cartabia was unanimously elected on Wednesday to head Italy’s constitutional court, the first time in the country’s history a woman has presided over the powerful body.
Cartabia, 56, had been considered in 2015 as a potential candidate for Italy’s presidency. And in September this year, she was approached to become prime minister after the disintegration of the previous government.
The constitutional court was created after World War II. Besides ruling on the constitutionality of laws and voting systems and approving referendums, it also decides major social or ethical issues, such as assisted suicide.
Cartabia was elected unanimously by the 15 judges sitting at the court, where she has served since 2011 as one of three women on the bench.
Born in San Giorgio su Legnano near Milan in 1963, Cartabia is one of the youngest ever presidents elected to the court.
Wife and mother to three children, she teaches constitutional law at the University of Milano-Bicocca after having taught and published research papers in numerous Italian and foreign universities, including in France, Spain, Germany and the United States.