Denmark, Finland say reopening schools did not worsen outbreak

Denmark reopened schools for students up to fifth grade on April 15. (AFP)
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Updated 28 May 2020

Denmark, Finland say reopening schools did not worsen outbreak

  • Denmark reopened schools for up to fifth grade on April 15
  • Finland allowed students to return to schools on May 14

A partial reopening of Danish schools did not lead to an increase in coronavirus infections among young students, a doctor of infectious disease epidemiology and prevention at the Danish Serum Institute said on Thursday, citing new data.
Denmark was one of the first countries to reopen society on April 15 after a one-month lockdown, allowing students up to fifth grade back in school.
“You cannot see any negative effects from the reopening of schools,” Peter Andersen told Reuters, referring to data updated on Wednesday.
The latest data showed no significant increase in infections among children aged between one and 19 in the weeks after the partial reopening of schools.
“Based on the preliminary experiences that we have had, it has been a prudent way to plan a reopening,” Andersen added.
Finland also has seen no evidence of the coronavirus spreading faster since schools started to reopen in the middle of May, the top health official said on Thursday.
“The time has been short, but so far we have seen no evidence,” Mika Salminen, director of health security at the Finnish Institute of Health and Welfare, told a news conference.
Finland started to reopen schools and daycare centers from May 14 following an almost two-month shutdown.


Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi confirms contesting for second term

Updated 12 sec ago

Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi confirms contesting for second term

  • Aung San Suu Kyi took the reins in 2016 after an electoral landslide, but has been forced to share power with the generals

YANGON: Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Tuesday formally declared her intention to seek a second term in an election in November that is seen as a test of the Southeast Asian nation’s tentative democratic reforms.
After decades of military rule, Suu Kyi, who won the Nobel Peace Prize for campaigning for democracy, took the reins in 2016 after an electoral landslide, but has been forced to share power with the generals.
Her international reputation slumped over Myanmar’s treatment of Rohingya Muslims but she remains popular at home, where her image is undented by accusations of complicity in atrocities against the minority.
On Tuesday, Suu Kyi, 75, waved to a crowd of around 50 supporters on the outskirts of the former capital Yangon to submit an application to run as a candidate.
Some of her supporters wore red-colored face masks denoting their backing for her National League for Democracy (NLD) party and shouted: “Mother Suu, be healthy.”
In 2017, a military-led crackdown in Myanmar resulted in more than 730,000 Rohingya fleeing across the border to Bangladesh, where they took shelter in refugee camps. UN investigators concluded that the military campaign had been executed with “genocidal intent.”
In January, Suu Kyi admitted that war crimes may have been committed against Rohingya, but denied genocide, saying refugees had exaggerated the extent of abuses against them
Mainly-Muslim Gambia had filed a suit in November at the International Court of Justice accusing Myanmar of “ongoing genocide” against the Rohingya. Myanmar has filed a report on its adherence to measures to protect Rohingya, but details of the document have not been published.
On the domestic front, Suu Kyi’s administration has had faltering peace talks with ethnic armed groups in various parts of the country, while a struggling economy faces new pressure from the coronavirus pandemic.
The Union Solidarity and Development Party, which is dominated by the military and retired civil servants, will be the NLD’s main opponent.