Dutch ‘should apologize for 2015 Iraq strike’: study

Dutch ‘should apologize for 2015 Iraq strike’: study
The Dutch government acknowledged in 2019 that 70 people, including civilians and Daesh fighters had died after a munitions factory was bombed in June 2015. (File/AFP)
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Updated 08 April 2022

Dutch ‘should apologize for 2015 Iraq strike’: study

Dutch ‘should apologize for 2015 Iraq strike’: study
  • The bombing by Dutch F-16 fighter planes targeting the Daesh group also caused hundreds of serious injuries
  • "The lack of an apology and actual reconstruction has a great impact on the perception of Hawija's residents," said the researchers

THE HAGUE: The Netherlands should apologize for a 2015 bombing in the Iraqi city of Hawija that killed 85 civilians, a study said Friday, adding that failure to do so could spawn future terror groups.
The bombing by Dutch F-16 fighter planes targeting the Daesh group also caused hundreds of serious injuries and damaged thousands of homes and shops, said the study by the Utrecht University and NGO groups.
“The lack of an apology and actual reconstruction has a great impact on the perception of Hawija’s residents,” said the researchers, who spoke to 160 residents — 119 of whom where victims — after the attack.
“It contributes to an anti-Western sentiment and, according to the researchers, can form a breeding ground for the next terrorist organization,” it said.
The Dutch government acknowledged in 2019 that 70 people, including civilians and Daesh fighters had died after a munitions factory was bombed on the night of June 2 to 3, 2015.
The cabinet told the Dutch parliament that the targeted factory in an industrial zone contained more explosives than first believed.
The Netherlands promised a “voluntary” 4-million-euro ($4.3 million) package to help with reconstruction.
Hawija’s residents felt abandoned and were demanding an apology from the Dutch government, they said.
The report recommended that Dutch government officials travel to Hawija to offer an apology and help to repair the damage.
The Dutch defense ministry said it was “not surprised” by the researchers’ findings but did not react on the report’s recommendations, the NRC daily newspaper reported.


Bahrain’s ambassador to the UK visits Oxford Center for Islamic Studies

Bahrain’s ambassador to the UK visits Oxford Center for Islamic Studies
Updated 11 sec ago

Bahrain’s ambassador to the UK visits Oxford Center for Islamic Studies

Bahrain’s ambassador to the UK visits Oxford Center for Islamic Studies
  • Sheikh Fawaz bin Mohammed Al-Khalifa saw his country’s pavilion at the center and reviewed research in a number of fields

LONDON: Sheikh Fawaz bin Mohammed Al-Khalifa, the Bahraini ambassador to the UK, visited his country’s pavilion at the Oxford Center for Islamic Studies, the Bahrain News Agency reported.

He also met the founder and director of the center, Farhan Ahmad Nizami, and reviewed its research into history, economics, arts and social science in the Islamic world. The envoy highlighted the role the center plays in bringing together elite scholars and researchers.

Nizami congratulated the ambassador on his recent appointment as the Dean of the Arab Diplomatic Corps.

The center is a registered educational charity that describes itself as being dedicated to the study of all aspects of Islamic culture and civilization, and of contemporary Muslim societies.


Aid workers face ‘alarming’ levels of incitement, violence in Yemen: UN humanitarian envoy

Aid workers face ‘alarming’ levels of incitement, violence in Yemen: UN humanitarian envoy
Updated 19 August 2022

Aid workers face ‘alarming’ levels of incitement, violence in Yemen: UN humanitarian envoy

Aid workers face ‘alarming’ levels of incitement, violence in Yemen: UN humanitarian envoy
  • Gressly said that aid workers in Yemen — more than 95 percent of whom are Yemenis – work to ensure that 12.6 million people receive humanitarian assistance
  • In first half of 2022, one aid worker was killed, two injured, seven kidnapped and nine detained.

LONDON: Attacks on aid workers in Yemen have increased at an “alarming” rate, the country’s UN humanitarian coordinator said on Friday.

David Gressly marked World Humanitarian Day on Aug. 19 by highlighting the “extremely challenging” environment that aid workers face in war-torn Yemen, especially amid Houthi attempts to control food aid distribution.

In a statement, Gressly said that aid workers in Yemen — more than 95 percent of whom are Yemenis – work to ensure that 12.6 million people receive humanitarian assistance or protection support every month.

But in the first half of 2022, one aid worker was killed, two injured, seven kidnapped and nine detained.

Gressly also pointed out 27 incidents of threat and intimidation between January and June, compared with 17 such incidents recorded in the whole of 2021.

He added that there were also 28 carjacking incidents recorded in the first six months of the year, 17 more than in 2021, and 27 attacks on aid organizations’ premises and facilities — including the looting of humanitarian supplies and other assets.

Gressly also highlighted how aid workers have been targets of disinformation and incitement in recent months, including “false allegations that they corrupt Yemeni values, including the morals of young women.”

He added: “Such baseless allegations jeopardize the safety and security of humanitarian workers, especially Yemeni female aid workers at a time when women and girls are experiencing increased levels of violence and a rollback of their rights in many parts of the globe.

“Violence and threats against humanitarian workers undermines the delivery of aid, further jeopardizing the lives of those most in need,” he said.

“Aid workers in Yemen deserve to be celebrated for their selfless dedication.”

While the UN-brokered ceasefire between the Houthis and the Arab Coalition to Restore Legitimacy in Yemen has provided relief to civilians since going into effect in April and deserves full backing, the humanitarian crisis is as dire as ever.

More than 23 million people need some form of humanitarian assistance or protection, according to Gressly.

The number of people facing food insecurity is projected to increase to 19 million by December. The malnutrition rate among women and children is among the highest in the world and a third of the 4.3 million internally displaced people in Yemen continue to live under extreme conditions, his statement said.

Without the tireless commitment of humanitarians in Yemen, the situation would be far worse, Gressly added.

“Aid workers in Yemen remain unwavering in their mission. These selfless women and men continue to step up to every day, providing millions of people in need with food and cash, health services and clean water, protection and emergency education.

“We should all do everything we can to protect them and support their critical work.”


US says ‘concerned’ by Israeli closure of Palestinian NGOs

US says ‘concerned’ by Israeli closure of Palestinian NGOs
Updated 19 August 2022

US says ‘concerned’ by Israeli closure of Palestinian NGOs

US says ‘concerned’ by Israeli closure of Palestinian NGOs
  • Six of the Palestinian organizations were labeled last October as terrorist organizations by Israel
  • The NGOs have all denied any links to the PFLP, which many western nations have designated a terrorist group

WASHINGTON: Washington said Thursday it was “concerned” by the Israeli government’s forced closure of several Palestinian NGOs operating in the occupied West Bank.
The Israeli military announced earlier in the day that it had conducted overnight raids of seven organizations in Ramallah, the West Bank city where the Palestinian Authority’s headquarters are located.
Six of the Palestinian organizations were labeled last October as terrorist organizations by Israel for their alleged links to the leftist militant group Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), though Israeli officials have not publicly shared any evidence of the links.
The NGOs have all denied any links to the PFLP, which many western nations have designated a terrorist group.
“We are concerned about the Israeli security forces’ closure of the six offices of the Palestinian NGOs in and around Ramallah today,” said US State Department spokesman Ned Price at a press briefing.
“We have not changed our position or approach to these organizations,” said Price, though he noted that Washington does not fund any of them.
“We have seen nothing in recent months to change (our position)” he added.
US officials have reached out to their Israeli counterparts “at the senior level” to obtain additional information, which Israel has promised to provide, according to Price.
The seventh organization raided by Israel on Thursday, the Union of Health Work Committees, was banned by Israel from working in the West Bank in 2020.


Israel announces plan to boost Gaza work permits

Israel announces plan to boost Gaza work permits
Updated 19 August 2022

Israel announces plan to boost Gaza work permits

Israel announces plan to boost Gaza work permits
  • A further 1,500 people from the impoverished and overcrowded Gaza Strip would be allowed to work in Israel from Sunday

JERUSALEM: Israel said Friday it plans to grant more work permits to Palestinians in blockaded Gaza, reviving a pledge made ahead of a visit by US President Joe Biden but later scrapped.
A further 1,500 people from the impoverished and overcrowded Gaza Strip would be allowed to work in Israel from Sunday, the military said in a statement.
“The decision will take effect ... on condition that the security situation remains quiet in the area,” said COGAT, the Israeli defense ministry body responsible for civil affairs in the Palestinian territories.
The move to boost to 15,500 the total number of work permits was initially announced on July 12, on the eve of Biden’s visit to Israel and the Palestinian territories.
But it was scrapped four days later, in the wake of rocket fire from the Gaza Strip and retaliatory strikes by Israeli warplanes.
The work permits provide vital income to some of Gaza’s 2.3 million people, who have been living under a strict blockade imposed by Israel since the Islamist movement Hamas seized power in 2007.
Friday’s announcement follows three days of fighting this month between Islamic Jihad militants and Israel.
At least 49 Gazans were killed and hundreds wounded, according to figures from the enclave’s health ministry.
The plan to issue additional permits follows a decision by Hamas largely to stay out of the recent fighting.


Market blast in north Syria kills at least 13, injures dozens

Market blast in north Syria kills at least 13, injures dozens
Updated 19 August 2022

Market blast in north Syria kills at least 13, injures dozens

Market blast in north Syria kills at least 13, injures dozens
  • The attack on the town of Al-Bab came days after a Turkish airstrike killed at least 11 Syrian troops and US-backed Kurdish fighters

BEIRUT: A rocket attack on a crowded market in a town held by Turkey-backed opposition fighters in northern Syria Friday killed at least nine people and wounded dozens, an opposition war monitor and a paramedic group reported.
The attack on the town of Al-Bab came days after a Turkish airstrike killed at least 11 Syrian troops and US-backed Kurdish fighters. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, an opposition war monitor, blamed Syrian government forces for the shelling, saying it was in retaliation for the Turkish airstrike.
The Observatory said the attack killed at least 13 and wounded more than 30.
The opposition’s Syrian Civil Defense, also known as White Helmets, had a lower death toll, saying nine people, including children, were killed and 28 were wounded. The paramedic group said its members evacuated some of the wounded and the dead bodies.
Discrepancies in casualty figures immediately after attacks are not uncommon in Syria.
Turkey has launched three major cross-border operations into Syria since 2016 and controls some territories in the north.
Although the fighting has waned over the past few years, shelling and airstrikes are not uncommon in northern Syria that is home to the last major rebel stronghold in the country.
Syria’s conflict that began in March 2011, has killed hundreds of thousands and displaced half the country’s pre-war population of 23 million.
President Bashar Assad’s forces now control most parts of Syria with the help of their allies, Russia and Iran.