UN: 200,000 more South Sudan refugees expected in Sudan

About another 200,000 South Sudanese refugees are expected to arrive in Sudan this year, fleeing fighting and food insecurity in their country, the United Nations said Thursday. (AP)
Updated 15 February 2018

UN: 200,000 more South Sudan refugees expected in Sudan

KHARTOUM: About another 200,000 South Sudanese refugees are expected to arrive in Sudan this year, fleeing fighting and food insecurity in their country, the United Nations said Thursday.
South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, descended into civil war just two years after it split from the north in 2011.
Since the war erupted in late 2013, 417,000 South Sudanese refugees have already crossed into Sudan, according to the UN.
About 200,000 more refugees are expected in 2018, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Office, or OCHA, said in its latest bulletin.
“Continued fighting, limited humanitarian assistance and extreme levels of food insecurity are forcing citizens of South Sudan to seek refuge, safety and access to food and basic services in neighboring countries,” OCHA said.
“The government of Sudan maintains an open border policy for the refugees, ensuring unfettered access, immediate protection and safety within Sudan’s borders.”
Most new refugees arriving in Sudan are expected to cross into White Nile, East Darfur and South Darfur states, OCHA said.
South Sudan’s leaders fought for decades for independence from the north, but an internal civil war erupted in December 2013 out of a power struggle between President Salwa Kiir and his former deputy Riek Machar.
The war has caused tens of thousands of deaths, uprooted nearly four million people — roughly a third of the population — and triggered sporadic outbreaks of famine.


Philippine police chief resigns amid drug allegations

In this Oct. 3, 2019, file photo, Philippine National Police chief Gen. Oscar Albayalde gestures as he testifies at the resumption of the Senate probe on the release of hundreds of convicts under the shortened serving of their sentence for good behavior, in suburban Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines. (AP)
Updated 44 min 47 sec ago

Philippine police chief resigns amid drug allegations

  • Albayalde resigned about three weeks before his scheduled retirement on Nov. 8

MANILA, Philippines: The Philippine national police chief has resigned after he faced allegations in a Senate hearing that he intervened as a provincial police chief in 2013 to prevent his officers from being prosecuted for allegedly selling a huge quantity of seized drugs.
Gen. Oscar Albayalde said Monday his decision relinquishing his post was accepted by Interior Secretary Eduardo Ano over the weekend but insisted on his innocence, saying he has never been criminally or administratively charged for the alleged irregularity. Albayalde resigned about three weeks before his scheduled retirement on Nov. 8.
The allegations against Albayalde were the latest dark cloud to loom over the national police force, which has largely been enforcing President Rodrigo Duterte’s bloody anti-drug crackdown that has left thousands of mostly petty drug suspects dead.