Tributes paid to the Muslim journalist who shot to fame for her hijab

Tributes paid to the Muslim journalist who shot to fame for her hijab
The 27-year-old journalist was born in Somalia in 1992. (File/AFP)
Updated 07 October 2019

Tributes paid to the Muslim journalist who shot to fame for her hijab

Tributes paid to the Muslim journalist who shot to fame for her hijab
  • The news resonated in the Muslim community, who was supportive of Yusuf’s career because of her advocacy for Muslim women
  • The 27-year-old journalist was born in Somalia in 1992 and emigrated to Europe at a young age

DUBAI: Tributes have been paid to the BBC journalist Hanna Yusuf, who shot to fame for publicly defending headscarf-wearing Muslims.

The BBC journalist's family broke the news of her death on October 1, saying they were “deeply saddened and heartbroken,” but gave no further information on her death.

“While we mourn her loss, we hope that Hanna’s legacy will serve as an inspiration and beacon to her fellow colleagues and to her community and her meaningful memory and the people she has touched for many years lives on,” her family said in a statement.

In 2015, she made a video for British national daily the Guardian defending the use of a headscarf, dispelling misconceptions of the hijab as a form of oppression.

In the video she said people should not assume that every woman who wears the hijab had been forced into it.

Andirachid Fidow, a Somalian activist who attended the Yusuf’s funeral in London, along with 6,000 others, tweeted: “Beautiful soul gone to soon, may her soul rest in peace.”

British Muslim journalist and author Hussein Kesvani said Yusuf was a “dear friend” to him, and posted a link to a fundraising campaign created following her death.

According to the Go Fund Me page, the money raised will be donated to a charity in Yusuf’s name, which will serve as her “Sadaqah Jariyah,” a form of ongoing charity usually given after a Muslim’s death.  

UK-based non-profit organization Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (Tell MAMA) also paid its tribute on Twitter, saying: “This is such a big loss.”

Muslim-focused blog Muslim Girl published a story remembering Yusuf’s work as an investigative journalist, including her stories on the violence in Somalia and her recent investigation into labor conditions at Costa Coffee stores in the UK.

The media industry was equally shocked by the news, and her colleagues quickly paid tribute to Yusuf, who worked her way up from a researcher to a television presenter.

The BBC’s Editorial Director Kamal Ahmed said: “Hanna Yusuf was sharp, witty and allowed us all to understand the important stuff a little better.”

The 27-year-old journalist was born in Somalia in 1992 and emigrated to Europe at a young age. Before her stint at the BBC, she wrote for other British publications including the Independent, the Times, and Muslim-focused news organization Muslim News.


Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated political show hosts axed in Egypt

The presenters hosted politically-fueled shows that were axed from Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated television stations Al-Sharq and Mekameleen. (Screenshot)
The presenters hosted politically-fueled shows that were axed from Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated television stations Al-Sharq and Mekameleen. (Screenshot)
Updated 10 min 59 sec ago

Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated political show hosts axed in Egypt

The presenters hosted politically-fueled shows that were axed from Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated television stations Al-Sharq and Mekameleen. (Screenshot)
  • Ankara-based Egyptian journalists, Moataz Matar and Muhammad Nasir, are known to be affiliated with the terrorist-designated Muslim Brotherhood

CAIRO: Two Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated presenters - known for their anti-Egyptian rhetoric - have said they are on "open leave" after their politically-fueled shows were axed from television stations Al-Sharq and Mekameleen.

Egyptian journalists, Moataz Matar and Muhammad Nasir, based in Ankara and known to be affiliated with the terrorist-designated Muslim Brotherhood, shared Twitter posts on Saturday that suggested the looming suspension of their shows. 

Matar announced Saturday evening that his program “With Moataz” on the Al-Sharq channel had come to an end, saying that he was going to be on open leave.

He also described the move as “one he had never desired.”

Matar added in a statement he recited on the program that the program’s halt came in order “to avoid any embarrassment that might fall on Turkey” in a reference to his continuous criticism of the Egyptian government.

Meanwhile, Nasir said on Twitter that he was also going to be on vacation during Ramadan from his show on Mekameleen channel.

It was reported earlier in March that Turkey demanded both satellite channels - which are affiliated to the Brotherhood - to halt airing political shows critical of Egypt according to sources cited by Al Arabiya TV.

The step came following statements by Turkey aimed at easing tensions with Egypt after eight years of disputes between the two countries.


Palestinian short film ‘The Present’ wins BAFTA award

Farah Nabulsi wrote the film along with US-Palestinian filmmaker Hind Shoufani. Supplied
Farah Nabulsi wrote the film along with US-Palestinian filmmaker Hind Shoufani. Supplied
Updated 11 April 2021

Palestinian short film ‘The Present’ wins BAFTA award

Farah Nabulsi wrote the film along with US-Palestinian filmmaker Hind Shoufani. Supplied

DUBAI: Palestinian-British filmmaker Farah Nabulsi’s short film “The Present” has won the award for Best Short Film at the 2021 British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) ceremony, which took place on Saturday. 

Nabulsi’s movie beat out “Eyelash,” “Lizard,” “Lucky Break” and “Curvy.” 

“The Present” tells the story of Yusef, played by renowned Palestinian actor Saleh Bakri, and his daughter Yasmine, played by young actress Maryam Kanj, who set out in Palestine’s West Bank to buy his wife a gift.

The film is also in the running for the “Best Live Action Short Film” category at the upcoming 2021 Oscars. 

It is competing against Doug Roland’s “Feeling Through,” Elvira Lind’s short drama “The Letter Room,” Travon Free’s “Two Distant Strangers” and the Tomer Shushan-directed “White Eye.”


Hamas attacks Al Arabiya TV for exposing prisoner mistreatment

Al-Shahateet, originally from Dura, southwest of Hebron, was released with serious psychological injuries. (Screenshot)
Al-Shahateet, originally from Dura, southwest of Hebron, was released with serious psychological injuries. (Screenshot)
Updated 10 April 2021

Hamas attacks Al Arabiya TV for exposing prisoner mistreatment

Al-Shahateet, originally from Dura, southwest of Hebron, was released with serious psychological injuries. (Screenshot)
  • Prisoners loyal to Hamas were accused of physically beating Al-Shahateet due to an organizational dispute with the leader of Hamas

LONDON: Hamas issued a statement attacking Al Arabiya TV on Friday for exposing the mistreatment of Mansour Al-Shahateet, a prisoner who was released from an Israeli jail after a 17-year sentence.

Prisoners loyal to Hamas were accused of physically beating Al-Shahateet due to an organizational dispute with Yahya Al-Sinwar, the leader of Hamas, who was also serving a prison sentence.

Al-Shahateet, originally from Dura, southwest of Hebron, was released with serious psychological injuries after being kept in solitary confinement for long periods of time. Hamas prisoners who were confined with Al-Shahateet reportedly refused to stay in detention with him after he was severely beaten, and requested that he be transferred to solitary confinement.

Al-Shahateet’s health was neglected and his mental state deteriorated rapidly. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas requested that the Ministry of Health provide him with the necessary medical treatment.


Saudi Research and Marketing Group shareholders to vote on group name change on 29 April: Argaam

Shareholders will also vote to elect members of the board of directors for the next three-year term, starting May 21, 2021. (Supplied)
Shareholders will also vote to elect members of the board of directors for the next three-year term, starting May 21, 2021. (Supplied)
Updated 10 April 2021

Saudi Research and Marketing Group shareholders to vote on group name change on 29 April: Argaam

Shareholders will also vote to elect members of the board of directors for the next three-year term, starting May 21, 2021. (Supplied)
  • Shareholders will also vote to elect members of the board of directors for the next three-year term, starting May 21, 2021
  • The audit committee members include Turki Omar Bugshan, Majid Abdulrhman Alissa and Hamad Saud Alomar

RIYADH: Saudi Research and Marketing Group’s (SRMG) shareholders will vote to amend Article 2 of the company’s Articles of Association, to change the firm’s name to Saudi Research and Media Group, during the extraordinary general assembly meeting (EGM) to be held on April 29, 2021, Argaam English reported.

Shareholders will also vote to elect members of the board of directors for the next three-year term, starting May 21, 2021.

They will also vote on the formation of the audit committee, and the definition of its duties, work regulations and remuneration of its members for the upcoming term.

The audit committee members include Turki Omar Bugshan, Majid Abdulrhman Alissa and Hamad Saud Alomar.

Originally published on Argaam English.


Study: Facebook delivers biased job ads, skewed by gender

Study: Facebook delivers biased job ads, skewed by gender
Updated 09 April 2021

Study: Facebook delivers biased job ads, skewed by gender

Study: Facebook delivers biased job ads, skewed by gender
  • Facebook ads were skewed by gender beyond what can be legally justified by differences in job qualifications, says University of Southern California researchers

Facebook is showing different job ads to women and men in a way that might run afoul of anti-discrimination laws, according to a new study.
University of Southern California researchers who examined the ad-delivery algorithms of Facebook and LinkedIn found that Facebook’s were skewed by gender beyond what can be legally justified by differences in job qualifications.
Men were more likely to see Domino’s pizza delivery driver job ads on Facebook, while women were more likely to see Instacart shopper ads.
The trend also held in higher-paying engineering jobs at tech firms like Netflix and chipmaker Nvidia. A higher fraction of women saw the Netflix ads than the Nvidia ads, which parallels the gender breakdown in each company’s workforce.
No evidence was found of similar bias in the job ads delivered by LinkedIn.
Study author Aleksandra Korolova, an assistant professor of computer science at USC, said it might be that LinkedIn is doing a better job at deliberately tamping down bias, or it might be that Facebook is simply better at picking up real-world cues from its users about gender imbalances and perpetuating them.
“It’s not that the user is saying, ‘Oh, I’m interested in this.’ Facebook has decided on behalf of the user whether they are likely to engage,” she said. “And just because historically a certain group wasn’t interested in engaging in something, doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have an opportunity to pursue it, especially in the job category.”
Facebook said in a statement Friday it has been taking meaningful steps to address issues of discrimination in ads.
“Our system takes into account many signals to try and serve people ads they will be most interested in, but we understand the concerns raised in the report,” it said.
Facebook promised to overhaul its ad targeting system in 2019 as part of a legal settlement.
The social network said then it would no longer allow housing, employment or credit ads that target people by age, gender or zip code. It also limited other targeting options so these ads don’t exclude people on the basis of race, ethnicity and other legally protected categories in the US, including national origin and sexual orientation.
Endlessly customizable ad targeting is Facebook’s bread and butter, so any limits placed on its process could hurt the company’s revenue. The ads users see can be tailored down to the most granular details — not just where people live and what websites they visited recently, but whether they’ve gotten engaged in the past six months or share characteristics with people who have recently bought new sneakers, even if they have never expressed interest in doing so themselves.
But even if advertisers can’t do the targeting themselves, the study shows what critics have stressed for years — that Facebook’s own algorithms can discriminate, even if there is no intent from the job advertisers themselves.
“We haven’t seen any public evidence that they are working on the issues related to their algorithms creating discrimination,” Korolova said.
Since it isn’t possible to show every user every advertisement that is targeted at them, Facebook’s software picks what it deems relevant. If more women show interest in certain jobs, the software learns it should show women more of these sorts of ads.
LinkedIn said the study’s findings align with its internal review of job ads targeting.
“However, we recognize that systemic change takes time, and we are at the beginning of a very long journey,” the company said in a statement.
US laws allow for ads to be targeted based on qualifications but not on protected categories such as race, gender and age. But anti-discrimination laws are largely complaint-driven, and no one can complain about being deprived of a job opportunity if they didn’t know it happened to them, said Sandra Wachter, a professor at Oxford University focused on technology law.
“The tools we have developed to prevent discrimination had a human perpetrator in mind,” said Wachter, who was not involved in the USC study. “An algorithm is discriminating very differently, grouping people differently and doing it in a very subtle way. Algorithms discriminate behind your back, basically.”
While Domino’s and Instacart have similar job requirements for their drivers, Domino’s delivery workforce is predominantly male, while Instacart’s is more than half female. The study, which looked at driver ads run in North Carolina compared to demographic data from voter records, found that Facebook’s algorithms appeared to be learning from those gender disparities and perpetuating them.
The same trend also occurred with sales jobs at retailer Reeds Jewelers, which more women saw, and the Leith Automotive dealership, which more men saw.
The researchers call for more rigorous auditing of such algorithms and to look at other factors such as racial bias. Korolova said external audits such as the USC study can only do so much without getting access to Facebook’s proprietary algorithms, but regulators could require some form of independent review to check for discrimination.
“We’ve seen that platforms are not so good at self-policing their algorithms for undesired societal consequences, especially when their business is at stake,” she said.