Liverpool’s Salah escapes with twisted ankle — reports

Salah sustained against Leicester on Saturday. (Reuters)
Updated 07 October 2019

Liverpool’s Salah escapes with twisted ankle — reports

  • He could return against Manchester United on October 20

LONDON: Mohamed Salah sustained a twisted ankle in Liverpool’s late victory over Leicester according to reports on Monday, but the Egyptian could still return for the Premier League leaders’ clash at Manchester United on October 20.
Salah hobbled off in added time during the 2-1 win over the Foxes on Saturday after being caught on the left ankle by a lunge from Hamza Choudhury.
The England under-21 international was booked, but Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp believed he should have seen red for a challenge he branded “dangerous as hell.”
Salah had already been excused from Egypt’s friendly against Botswana on October 14 with Pharaohs head coach Hossam El Badry saying his star player “must rest.”
The Liverpool Echo reported: “Salah suffered a twisted ankle in the challenge, and while there is no timescale set on his return, Liverpool are hopeful there is no long-term damage.”
After Salah had been withdrawn, Liverpool struck late through James Milner’s penalty to open up an eight-point lead at the top of the Premier League.
And next up they can rub more salt into Manchester United wounds with the Red Devils already 15 points behind their rivals down in 12th.
“Salah has not yet been ruled in or out of that fixture, with it being too early in the healing process for the medical staff to make a decision,” added the Echo’s report.


South Korea football team departs for World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang

Updated 56 min 6 sec ago

South Korea football team departs for World Cup qualifier in Pyongyang

BEIJING: South Korean footballers departed for Pyongyang on Monday to play a World Cup qualifier against North Korea amid deadlocked talks over the North’s nuclear arsenal.
The teams — with Tottenham’s star forward Son Heung-min included in the South Korean squad — are expected to face each other at the Kim Il Sung Stadium on Tuesday.
This will be the first competitive men’s game between the two sides to be held in Pyongyang, and has raised hopes for new momentum in ties between the two Koreas.
But Pyongyang refused to hold direct talks with Seoul on the logistics for the match, denying South Korean fans and journalists permission to travel with the team.
South Korean players said the absence of cheering fans will be a first.
“It’s much better to play in a packed stadium rather than an empty one, but I think we’ll be able to play a good match if we use it as motivation,” said defender Kim Min-jae before boarding a flight to Pyongyang at Beijing airport.
The South Korean footballers were accompanied by a delegation of 55 people, limited to players, coaches and staff.
Broadcasters in the South said that plans to air the match live had fallen apart, with some media reporting that there may be attempts to carry the North Korean feed.
The match comes in the wake of a series of North Korean missile tests that raised tensions in the region, and after the breakdown of talks with the United States over Pyongyang’s weapons programs.