Does this equation prove Bella Hadid is the world’s most beautiful woman? One doctor thinks so

Bella Hadid has been declared the most beautiful woman in the world on the basis of an ancient Greek equation that measures beauty. (AFP)
Updated 19 October 2019

Does this equation prove Bella Hadid is the world’s most beautiful woman? One doctor thinks so

DUBAI: US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid has been declared the most beautiful woman in the world by one doctor on the basis of an ancient Greek equation that measures beauty.

London-based cosmetic surgeon Julian De Silva made the claim using the so-called “golden ratio of beauty,” which found Hadid’s facial features to be 94.35 percent symmetric.

 

“Her eyes, eyebrows, nose, lips, chin, jaw and facial shape were measured and came closest to the ancient Greeks’ idea of perfection,” the surgeon wrote on his Instagram account.

 

“The golden ratio was a mathematical equation devised by the Greeks in an attempt to measure beauty,” he explained.

 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi 2/10 #jdsgoldenratio @beyonce - 92.44% Beyoncé came in second place as she scored highly on her forehead and brow area. She looks incredible as she approaches her 40s. She had a near perfect score for her face shape. How is the Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi measured? The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi originates from the European Renaissance. Artists and Architects used an equation - known as the Golden Ratio - as an aid during the creation of their masterpieces. Scientists have since adapted the mathematical formula to explain what makes a person beautiful. The length and the width of someone's face is measured and then the results are divided. According to the Golden Ratio, the ideal result is roughly 1.6. Measurements are then taken from the forehead hairline to the spot between the eyes, from the spot between the eyes and the bottom of the nose and from the bottom of the nose to the bottom of the chin. A person is considered to be more beautiful if the numbers are equal. Attention is then given to the symmetry and proportion of the face. To be deemed 'beautiful' according to the Golden Ratio, the length of the ear must be equal to the length of the nose and the width of an eye should be equal to the distance between the eyes. #news#beauty#plasticsurgery#harleystreet#beautifacation#beautifulfaces#jdsgoldenratio

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The US singer Beyonce was ranked second with a 92.44 percent symmetry reading.

 


Kurdish singer Nouri: ‘I want to be the greatest’

Her story is all the more remarkable for the fact that she was born in a Syrian refugee camp after her parents fled Kurdistan in the early Nineties. (Supplied)
Updated 40 min 51 sec ago

Kurdish singer Nouri: ‘I want to be the greatest’

DUBLIN: Vivian Nouri is a woman on a mission. The Kurdish singer ­— more commonly known as NOURI — has made something of a splash in recent months. Her debut single “Where Do We Go From Here” reached number one in New Zealand in March this year (it currently has more than 1.1 million views on YouTube), before topping charts everywhere from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait to Iraq and Palestine.

Her story is all the more remarkable for the fact that she was born in a Syrian refugee camp after her parents fled Kurdistan in the early Nineties. They moved to New Zealand when Nouri was three.

She cites Christina Aguilera, Britney Spears, Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston as performers who inspired her early love of music. “By the time I was seven, I would copy their singing on the TV, but I was never sure if I was doing it right.”

Turned out she was, though. At nine, in her first talent show, Nouri sang “When You Believe” — a duet by Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey for the 1998 animation “The Prince of Egypt.” She received a standing ovation. And it was a buzz she never forgot.

“The thrill of performing, the feeling of singing the song and everyone loving it, and the shock of getting a standing ovation — that I could sing and other people liked it…” she says. “I’ve been chasing that feeling ever since.”

Nouri's story is all the more remarkable for the fact that she was born in a Syrian refugee camp after her parents fled Kurdistan in the early Nineties. (Supplied)

“You never know when it’s finished, so the best thing to do is to hand it over to someone else and they will tell you when it’s ready,” she continues. “And that’s one of the best things about being in Los Anglese: being able to work both with Grammy award-winning producers as well as newer producers who are just grinding it out. You see different patterns and styles and it gives you a feel for different production styles.”

Nouri made the move to LA earlier this year, and is confident she can avoid the pitfalls that living in that city sometimes throws up. “Every day’s a learning experience in LA; I’m learning about new music, new concepts, as well as meeting new people and being exposed to new cultures and influences,” she says.

Nouri already had some experience of Hollywood glamour — she performed “The Only Gift I Need” for the soundtrack of the 2017 Will Ferrell-led comedy “Daddy’s Home 2.” And since moving to LA, she has been invited to sing the US national anthem at a few NBA games. But she’s hungry for further success.

“Where Do We Go From Here” is a perfect slice of slow-burn pop, with echoes — both in the music and the video — of Lana Del Rey. Nouri’s sound is compelling, and very modern, something reflected in her creative process.

Her debut single “Where Do We Go From Here” reached number one in New Zealand in March this year. (Supplied)

“Before I enter the recording studio, or a writing session, I have a concept in my mind of what I want to sing about,” she says. “It changes sometimes, so there has to be flexibility. I can be in the studio and hear a new beat and that will change the music, and ultimately it’s a collaboration. So we work together with the concept, starting either with the lyrics or the melody and going from there.

A big part of her drive comes from her upbringing. “My mum instilled discipline in all of us. It was hard to convince my mother that I was going to be a singer, but when she saw how hard I was working towards it, that put her mind at rest,” she says.

Nouri has spoken before about how her earliest memories are of the Syrian refugee camp, where she lived in a tent so small that her mother had to keep her feet outside it when she lay down. Those memories have undoubtedly played a major part in her relentless work ethic.

“I get up at the same time each morning, I go to the gym every day,” she says. “It’s almost like being in school with a set schedule. There’s a million other people doing the same thing, so you have to stay focused and disciplined. And so any temptations go right over my head, because I know what I have to do to get where I want.”

And where she wants to go is the very top. One of the refreshing things about Nouri is her complete honesty about her goals; there’s no circumspect mutterings about taking each day as it comes.

Nouri's family moved to New Zealand when Nouri was three. (Supplied)

“I want to be the greatest one day,” she says. “I want to leave something behind that people will remember. It’s a very competitive industry, but I’m looking to win. I am competing with myself and not with anyone else. I want to make sure I win for myself and my people and to make sure my story is heard — my story is the story of a billion other people and I want that heard. Of course, I have specific goals too, like winning a Grammy and then winning an Oscar and getting a Netflix documentary.”

That ambition goes hand-in-hand with her work ethic — for ambition is useless without drive. “I always say hard work trumps talent so when you have both, it’s inevitable, and I always feel like it’s never enough,” she says. “I get the Grammy and I take in the moment, but then I would focus on the next step, so how do I get the Oscar? Every day I am here I am serious and making sure I am taking advantage of the opportunities I have been given.”

Nouri is equally clear about what she wants her music to achieve on an emotional level too.

“I want my music to make people dance and cry at the same time. I have a hard time expressing how I feel when I speak, so my music is open instead — I express (myself) through my music,” she says.”Through my lyrics, I say the things people are too afraid to say.”