Megan thee Stallion and Cardi B wear Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran in new video

The US rappers released the video for their latest single on Aug. 7. Supplied
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Updated 11 August 2020

Megan thee Stallion and Cardi B wear Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran in new video

DUBAI: This weekend, US rappers Megan thee Stallion and Cardi B dropped the highly-anticipated music video for their joint single “WAP.” In addition to superstar cameos from the likes of Kylie Jenner, Rosalia and Normani, the music video was rife with statement-making style moments. Think: Neon wigs, custom Mugler bodysuits and leopard-print galore.

Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran also created two coordinating looks, one for Megan and one for Cardi, for the new video. 

The matching outfits included a corseted bodice with a semi-detached train in yellow and salmon colorways.

The video comes just days after the horrific explosion that ripped through Beirut’s port area, killing over 150 people and injuring thousands. The mushroom-shaped blast also left Beirut’s fashion designers reeling amidst the devastation, with damaged or destroyed shops and studios compounding the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Jebran took to his Instagram after the video’s release on Aug. 7 to post a picture of his sketch, nestled between rubble and debris following the horrific explosion that destroyed much of his Beirut atelier, showcasing his design process and the reality of the tragic incident. 

“Today, we were supposed to be excited! To celebrate a project in which we defied Covid19 to achieve!” he wrote. “However, our country is mourning and our faces can’t even smile! Among the wreckage, the broken glass and shattered offices lie the glowing colors of hope,” he added, concluding “For better tomorrows, we pray, we hope, we aspire.”

Jebran’s celebrity-studded client list includes some of the world's biggest fashion icons in Hollywood, Bollywood and Arab cinema, from Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez to Priyanka Chopra and Maya Diab. 

 


REVIEW: It’s a tough, brutal world in ‘The Devil All the Time’

Updated 42 min 17 sec ago

REVIEW: It’s a tough, brutal world in ‘The Devil All the Time’

  • Tom Holland leads an all-star cast in Netflix’s gritty post-war thriller

LONDON: The star-studded cast of “The Devil All the Time” promises big things. Tom Holland and Sebastian Stan (both mainstays of the Marvel cinematic universe), Bill Skarsgård (fresh from traumatizing a new generation in the “It” movie remakes), Jason Clarke (“First Man” and “Pet Sematary”) and new Batman Robert Pattinson all signed on for this Netflix thriller, directed and co-written by Antonio Campos, one of the filmmakers involved in the recent COVID-era anthology “Homemade.”

“The Devil All the Time” follows a disparate group of characters in post-war Ohio and West Virginia. (Supplied)

Based on the novel by Donald Ray Pollock, who takes a turn as the movie’s narrator, “The Devil All the Time” follows a disparate group of characters in post-war Ohio and West Virginia. Returning soldier Willard Russell (Skarsgård ) believes he’s left the war behind him when he meets waitress Charlotte (Haley Bennett). The two have a son, Arvin. But despite these positive overtones, Campos’ world is one of ever-present menace, with corrupt officials, twisted lovers and charlatan preachers behind seemingly every corner, waiting to sully any glimmer of optimism with depravity.

Adult Arvin (played with surprising grit and gravitas by Holland, better known for his bright-and-breezy Spider-Man) struggles to cope with the brutality of the world as it batters him at every turn. When vile preacher Preston Teagardin (Pattinson) rolls into town, his sinister intentions are telegraphed from the get go and, unsurprisingly, his predatory nature kickstarts a chain of events that lifts the lid on the darkest possible side of 1960s USA.

Holland is a joy to watch, his dramatic heft belying his young age. Pattinson is, quite simply, horrifically intoxicating, throwing himself into the role with all the sneering vileness he can muster. The two Brits steal the lion’s share of the limelight, but Campos’ film benefits from the high-caliber ensemble. Simply by pointing a camera at them, the director is onto a winner.

The movie doesn’t shy away from violence, and some scenes are a little tough to take. And it’s an unrelenting second half as Holland’s world comes tumbling down in relatively short order. “The Devil Al the Time” is a brutal, visceral experience. But great performances from a stellar cast make it an engaging one.