UAE grants scholarship to children of coronavirus frontline workers

UAE grants scholarship to children of coronavirus frontline workers
The Frontline Heroes Office was established in July 2020 to support medical and non-medical workers fighting COVID-19 in UAE. (File/AFP)
Short Url
Updated 17 September 2020

UAE grants scholarship to children of coronavirus frontline workers

UAE grants scholarship to children of coronavirus frontline workers
  • The new initiative aims to remove some of the financial burden experienced by many frontline healthcare professionals
  • Around 1,850 children have already received the scholarships, which cover costs of tuition, transportation, and laptops

DUBAI: The children of frontline healthcare professionals in the UAE will be eligible for scholarships across the country’s public schools, state news agency WAM has reported.
The new initiative, called “Hayyakum,” aims to remove some of the financial burden experienced by many frontline healthcare professionals and encourage them to keep their jobs.
Around 1,850 children have already received the scholarships, which cover costs of tuition, transportation, and laptops.
“We, at the Frontline Heroes Office, hope to provide the same level of support and compassion that those on the frontline have provided to millions of people across our nation,” Sheikh Sultan bin Tahnoon Al-Nahyan, Chairman of the Board of the Frontline Heroes Office, said.
The Frontline Heroes Office was established in July 2020 to support medical and non-medical workers who are on the UAE’s frontline against COVID-19.
“We wish their children every success as they embark upon a new school year and we look forward to watching them follow in their parents’ footsteps to become outstanding members of society,” Al-Nahyan added.
The country’s Education Minister Hussain bin Ibrahim Al-Hammadi welcomed the grant, describing it as a true example of community solidarity.”
“The Ministry on Education seeks to directly provide educational support for the children of frontline healthcare professionals so they can continue their invaluable and noble work,” he said.


Egypt’s 14-fold population rise in 135 years a ‘national problem’: Govt. minister

Updated 03 December 2020

Egypt’s 14-fold population rise in 135 years a ‘national problem’: Govt. minister

Egypt’s 14-fold population rise in 135 years a ‘national problem’: Govt. minister
  • The rise had impacted on each individual’s share of education, health, and available resources, affecting overall demographics: minister

CAIRO: Egypt’s 14-fold population increase between 1882 and 2017 had created a “national problem” that required urgent attention, a government minister has said.

Deputy Minister of Health and Population Tarek Tawfik revealed that over the 135-year period the number of people living in the country had shot up from 6.7 million to 94.8 million.

The rise had impacted on each individual’s share of education, health, and available resources, affecting overall demographics, he added.

“(The population increase) is a national problem that needs to be solved through the collaboration of efforts between all the ministries, governmental, and non-governmental institutions, and the civil society,” Tawfik said.

He pointed out that the Egyptian National Population Council was currently drafting public policy documentation in collaboration with The American University in Cairo (AUC) aimed at resolving some of the country’s population-related issues.

Plans in the pipeline included awareness campaigns on family sizes, food and water security, and sustainability.

The council’s former rapporteur, Dr. Amr Hassan, said that a family planning project due to be launched early next year, would help to cut the birth rate in Egypt by 1 million.

Egyptian Minister of International Cooperation Dr. Rania Al-Mashat, US Agency for International Development (USAID) Mission Director Leslie Reed, AUC President Francis Joseph Ricciardone, and Tawfik recently launched the Strengthening Egypt’s Family Planning Program (SEFPP) youth competition, part of a $31 million initiative previously signed with the USAID to improve population health results.

Al-Mashat said that improving general healthcare, reproductive health, and family planning services were key to achieving economic empowerment for men and women.

She pointed out that the SEFPP youth competition was aimed at paving the way for the implementation of new and effective solutions to the issues and involved the Egyptian government, educational institutions and universities, youth, and civil society organizations represented by the USAID.

The program was designed to tackle the over-population problem through innovative techniques, developing youth ideas on family planning schemes, and raising awareness throughout the country.